socialization

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socialization

Post by terry b » Mon, 10 Sep 2007 17:41:57



      I need some advice regarding my dog. Strider is 5 years old and he
is a Labrador mix. I do not know what he is be mixed with but he looks
just like a lab (I know that one of his parents was a lab), only smaller
and slimmer with some white on his chest and his paws. He has been with
me since he was six weeks old.
      Unfortunately he was not socialized very well. This was my fault
of course, but part of the problem is that I was new to the area and
didnt have anyone to really introduce him to. I should have made a
better effort but I did not. I did have him in puppy training for about
6 weekends when he was 8 months old with a trainer and another dog
owner. He was fine with them.
      The problem is that he has never been around anyone except for me
and some family members for the most part. The only time that he has
been around others was when I would board him when I went on vacation.
He was always fine with the kennel workers and other dogs from what I
have been told, but he has always had trouble when it came time to meet
new people at the house. He would bark at them and act aggressive, but
to be honest there have not been many opportunities for him.
      I know that this is a problem that I should have addressed some
time ago, but I didnt. The current situation is that I need to move
soon and my best option financially would be to move in with a
roommate(s). I may be able to afford my own place, but it would be
financially better if I was able to share expenses.
      This leads me to my question. Is it too late to have the problem
of an un-socialized dog addressed at 5 years old? I do not know how he
will react around others that he does not know, but if a behaviorist
will help then I will try that. Of course I DO need to do that
regardless, but I am wondering if anyone thinks that Strider is beyond
help. A dog trainer offered an opinion that his behavior shows that he
is insecure, but I do not know if this is true.
      I do want to add that Strider is smart and he continues to learn.
When I first moved to my current place we had construction workers on
both sides of the property and he used to bark at them when I had him
out, but over time he realized they were not a threat and he began to
ignore them.
      Any advice would be appreciated. I know that this is my fault and
I hope that I can remedy it. Thank you.
 
 
 

socialization

Post by Bill » Mon, 10 Sep 2007 22:13:40


1. I have read in dog training books that you *can* teach an old dog new
tricks. No big deal.

2. I assure you your dog would do just fine around me. I've been around many
dogs where the owners say their dogs "don't like anyone", "don't like men",
or whatever. Me and the dog become best friends. The owners are amazed.

I don't know what I do, but I do respect the independence of the dog. Let it
sniff my hand first while looking it in the eyes. Then I guess depending on
the response of the dog, I will back off or pet it on the head. I guess I am
letting the dog inform me after smelling my hand how it wants to proceed
with the "relationship" after this initial meeting.

So I guess you have "dog people" and those who are not dog people. Might
want to let the dog help you pick your roommate.

Then I would try taking the dog around people more in the mean time. Go to
parks. Take dog for walks. See if there are any dog shows at parks and take
your dog to these.

Most people I encounter when I take my dog for a walk are pretty cool. They
will not just go up to my dog and pet her. They will first ask "Does the dog
bite?" or "My I pet your dog?". If this happens, might want to explain the
situation and let them proceed at their own risk. If person wants to help
you, maybe let dog approach stranger. Let dog just sniff them at first -
maybe no petting to begin with.

If dog does anything ***, pull on leash and say NO!

I would stay away from small children. They tend to put their hands/faces
right in front of the dogs face and seem to TRY to get the dog to bite them.
So when my dog is around small children, I need to watch the dog and the
children. Tell dog no don't do that. Tell kid no don't do that. (Every 5
seconds!)

Have fun! (This is a fun thing...)

Quote:

>      I need some advice regarding my dog. Strider is 5 years old and he is
> a Labrador mix. I do not know what he is be mixed with but he looks just
> like a lab (I know that one of his parents was a lab), only smaller and
> slimmer with some white on his chest and his paws. He has been with me
> since he was six weeks old.
>      Unfortunately he was not socialized very well. This was my fault of
> course, but part of the problem is that I was new to the area and didnt
> have anyone to really introduce him to. I should have made a better effort
> but I did not. I did have him in puppy training for about 6 weekends when
> he was 8 months old with a trainer and another dog owner. He was fine with
> them.
>      The problem is that he has never been around anyone except for me and
> some family members for the most part. The only time that he has been
> around others was when I would board him when I went on vacation. He was
> always fine with the kennel workers and other dogs from what I have been
> told, but he has always had trouble when it came time to meet new people
> at the house. He would bark at them and act aggressive, but to be honest
> there have not been many opportunities for him.
>      I know that this is a problem that I should have addressed some time
> ago, but I didnt. The current situation is that I need to move soon and
> my best option financially would be to move in with a roommate(s). I may
> be able to afford my own place, but it would be financially better if I
> was able to share expenses.
>      This leads me to my question. Is it too late to have the problem of
> an un-socialized dog addressed at 5 years old? I do not know how he will
> react around others that he does not know, but if a behaviorist will help
> then I will try that. Of course I DO need to do that regardless, but I am
> wondering if anyone thinks that Strider is beyond help. A dog trainer
> offered an opinion that his behavior shows that he is insecure, but I do
> not know if this is true.
>      I do want to add that Strider is smart and he continues to learn.
> When I first moved to my current place we had construction workers on both
> sides of the property and he used to bark at them when I had him out, but
> over time he realized they were not a threat and he began to ignore them.
>      Any advice would be appreciated. I know that this is my fault and I
> hope that I can remedy it. Thank you.

 
 
 

socialization

Post by DelusionalDimensionsRecovery.. » Tue, 11 Sep 2007 09:32:36


HOWEDY Bill,


Quote:
> 1. I have read in dog training books that you *can* teach
> an old dog new tricks. No big deal.

You been readin adam katz and cesar millan "z dog wheeesperer", eh,
Billy <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
> 2. I assure you your dog would do just fine around me.

You like to jerk ***shock bribe crate and intimidate
dogs, don't you, Billy <{}: ~ ( >

IN FACT, your own dog was AFRAID of the DARK <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
> I've been around many dogs where the owners say their
> dogs "don't like anyone", "don't like men", or whatever.
> Me and the dog become best friends.

Well Billy, perhaps you ain't much of a man, eh?

Quote:
> The owners are amazed.

INDEED? Are their dogs AFRAID of the DARK, too?

Quote:
> I don't know what I do,

Of curse you do, Billy. You'd HURT and INTIMIDATE IT.

Quote:
> but I do respect the independence of the dog.

That so? Is THAT HOWE COME you jerk ***an shock them?

Quote:
> Let it sniff my hand first while looking it in the eyes.

That'll INTIMIDATE the dog, Billy <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
> Then I guess depending on the response of the dog,

You mean you GOT NO METHOD, Billy?

Quote:
> I will back off or pet it on the head. I guess I am letting
> the dog inform me after smelling my hand how it wants
> to proceed with the "relationship" after this initial meeting.

Oh, so you let the DOG train you, eh, Billy?

Quote:
> So I guess you have "dog people" and those who are not
> dog people.

You just GUESSIN, Billy?

Quote:
>  Might want to let the dog help you pick your roommate.

BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAAA!!!

Quote:
> Then I would try taking the dog around people more
> in the mean time. Go to parks. Take dog for walks.
> See if there are any dog shows at parks and take
> your dog to these.

Yeah. Perhaps they'll run into janet boss or diddler, eh?

Quote:
> Most people I encounter when I take my dog for a walk
> are pretty cool. They will not just go up to my dog and
> pet her. They will first ask "Does the dog bite?" or "My
> I pet your dog?". If this happens, might want to explain
> the situation and let them proceed at their own risk.

If her dogs BITES them she might have to *** IT, Billy.

Quote:
>  If person wants to help you, maybe let dog approach
> stranger. Let dog just sniff them at first - maybe no
> petting to begin with.

Or MAYBE NOT, dependin on what the DOG wants, eh, Billy?

Quote:
> If dog does anything ***,

Dogs don't do ***, Billy. People do. People like YOU.

Quote:
> pull on leash and say NO!

SEE?

Quote:
> I would stay away from small children.

A WIZE idea, Billy <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
>  They tend to put their hands/faces right in front of the
> dogs face and seem to TRY to get the dog to bite them.

Kinda like HOWE you do when you jerk an ***them
for BEIN AFRAID, eh, Billy <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
> So when my dog is around small children, I
> need to watch the dog and the children.

You mean on accHOWENTA your dog is so well trained?

Quote:
>  Tell dog no don't do that.

Don't you think that's TOO MANY WORDS, Billy?

Quote:
> Tell kid no don't do that. (Every 5 seconds!)

That'll make the dog AFRAID, Billy <{}: ~ ( >

Quote:
> Have fun! (This is a fun thing...)

Jerking *** an shocking dogs is ALWAYS FUN, billy:


Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2007 09:46:48 -0700
Subject: Puppy trained in one week!

I have a 9 week old Lab/mix female which I have been able to train in
one week! (Or she has trained me, one of the two!)

First off I am home 24/7 mostly, so this gives me a big advantage in
training. Also I watched a DVD on training
pets which basically said positive reinforcement, if dog
goes to bathroom inside house, whack *yourself* in head
for not keeping an eye on dog, but don't punish dog.

-Because I am always home, I have been able to watch her CONSTANTLY.
Every time she gets up to go somewhere I follow her. I think this is
the key to her learning so quickly.

She gets constant feedback on her actions and
repetition.

-If she gets up and starts sniffing around, I say "Want to go
outside?" Then I go outside and she follows. About half the
trips outside she will do her business outside. The other half she
sits and stares at me or sniffs around a bit.

-She did go to the bathroom inside the house many times at first. She
would quickly walk over to the carpet and start going. But I was
watching! I quickly grabbed her, said "NO", then took her outside.

Then I scrubbed the spot, sprayed on odor neutralizer,
and then sprayed on dog repellant.

-I feed her at locations in the house where she has gone to the
bathroom last. (Theory being that a dog will not do its business where
it eats.) She has kept moving her locations in the house where she
goes to the bathroom.

She has hit almost every room. And I have fed her in every room she
has gone to the bathroom in.

-When she does her business outside, I look e***d/pleased, I say
"Good Doggie!" several times,
pet her a whole lot, then we go inside and I give
her a treat. Then again say "Good Doggie!" and pet her.

Yesterday she did all her business outside and did not go inside the
house once. (I had to put a light up to get her to go outside at
night.)

-For barking, at first she would constantly bark when left outside by
herself or when left in her crate inside the house. Yesterday I put
her outside and closed the door. She barked twice then stopped and not
another peep out of her (I went next door for 15 minutes so I could
hear her.)

Later someone came to the door and she barked. So now she barks
occasionally (ok), but no longer constantly when left alone.

For the "no bark" training, my tools were an anti-bark collar and my
attention.

The first couple of days I left her outside with the collar on and she
would bark away! Later I would put her in her crate inside the house
with the collar on and she would bark and bark. I would ignore her
until she stopped barking, then let her in the house or out of her
crate.

The next day I put her outside *without* the collar on and she barked
and barked. Also in crate without collar on and let her bark away.
Again I only let her in the house when she stopped barking or out of
her crate when she stopped barking.

Next day I put her outside *without* her collar on. Then she started
barking. I went outside, said "NO", and put on the anti-bark collar.
Then she kept on barking. Then I went outside again, said "NO", then
took her inside and placed her in the crate, then went in the other
room.

(Progressive loss of freedom with continued barking. Constant barking
and you will get the collar. Still keep barking and you will get the
crate with no attention from me!)

With her in the crate and barking away, I ignored her. When she would
stop barking for a moment, I would walk into the room so she could see
me. If she started barking again, I would go back into the other room
(ignore her).

I did this several times. About the third time she stayed silent. Then
I walked a few steps closer to her. Then she barked again, then I left
the room again.

Basically if she stopped barking, I would walk into the room so she
could see me (give her attention), then if she kept silent, I would
walk closer and closer to the crate - a few steps at a time. If she
continued to remain silent, I would eventually get up to the crate and
then open the door.

If at any time she would bark, I would turn my back and walk back a
few steps. If she kept on barking, I would walk further and further
away and then leave the room again.

It was a learning / progressive thing. I was able to get closer and
closer to her crate each time, then eventually all the way up to the
crate, then open the door and let her out.

Lesson: Constant barking will make me leave and you will not get any
attention. If you can control yourself and not bark, you will get
progressively more attention (I will come closer). If you can keep
quiet for a period of time, I will eventually let you out of your
crate and you will be rewarded!

After she was able to keep from barking long enough for me to let her
out of her crate, I opened the door, petted her, praised her, and gave
her a treat.

Said "Good Doggie!" Then left her out of the crate for the rest of the
day. Gave her plenty of attention.

Then I did the above a second day.

The training her "not to constantly bark" took "nerves of steel". You
feel like you are being "mean" ignoring the poor thing. Or leaving her
with that collar on. But luckily she learned quickly, so this
"unpleasantness" is now over with.

                      ---------------------

    BWEEEAAAHAAAHAAAA!~!~!

HOWEsbreakin is INSTINCTIVE at four weeks of age, Billy.

You can HOWEsbreak ANY dog NEARLY INSTANTLY.

                        LIKE THIS:


        Subject: Re: Info. on the puppy wizard?
        Date: 2004-07-18 14:27:02 PST

        > > Oh, and did I mention his methods work, ya nuff
        > > said.
        > >
        > > Mike
        >
        > Ok Mike which part worked for you?

        It helped clear problems from my dogs in the field
        using the can penny distraction technique. Works like
        a charm. My dogs get distracted easy from their jobs
        ie, retrieving or training to find lost people, oh did
        I mention that I am a Search and Rescue Team
        Leader.

        Sorry that slipped my mind.

        I have read volumes of training books and don't know
        where people get that Jerry copied others work as I
        have NEVER come across his methods before. I would
        like to see proof.

        Just like Jerry outlined I eliminated problems one at
        at time as they arose. I used to try and train to the
        way I wanted them but this is backward, you train out
        the problems leaving what you want left over.
        Funny part is the second dog who had the same problems
        as the other didn't need correcting for some of his
        habits after I cleared it from the first dog. Seemed
        he learned through osmosis. Nice side benefit
        there.
...

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