Male dog's excitement seems painful

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Male dog's excitement seems painful

Post by The Puppy Wizar » Tue, 13 Jan 2004 01:17:36



HOWEDY amy, jim, Charlie & Holly,



Quote:

> OK folks

You mean the liars, dog abusers and mental cases
who've got the same same same same PROBLEMS?

Quote:
> this is a topic that I can't seem to find very much feedback on

The Puppy Wizard has written perfect advice on ALL behavior
problems. You're just too ignorant and fearful to believe your
dog's behavior and temperament and health problems are
CAUSED BY MISHANDLING.

Quote:
> so I wanted to run it by you guys.

BWEEHAHAHAHAHAHAHAA!!!

THEY HURT AND KILLD DOGS AND TAKE PSYCHOTROPIC
MEDICATIONS TO CONTROL THEIR OWN PSYCHOSES!!!

Quote:
>  It's a little graphic but certainly nothing
> this group cant handle.

Your PALS are used to vulgarity and disgusting behavior.

Quote:
>  I am writing about one of my mom's dogs, Gio. He is
> a labX, we think mixed with shepherd but we are not
> sure. He has a pointed nose and pointy ears and is
>  somewhat slender. Gio has a rather disturbing
> problem of e***ment.

The dog is HYPERACTIVE cause he's been ABUSED.

Like yourself... "The fruit don't fall far from the goddamned
fruitcake," The Puppy Wizard's DADDY.

Quote:
> He is fixed,

You mean IT was surgically mutilated to control
hyperactive behavior.

Quote:
> but gets ***s fairly often.

That's from ANXIHOWESNESS.

Quote:
>  Now I know that isn't an issue,

Of curse not! Not to a DOG ABUSER.

BWEEHAHAHAHAHAHHAAA!!!

Quote:
>  but here is the issue.

The ISSUE is the dog is being ABUSED.

Quote:
> When my mom comes home after work and does
> her usual fuss over the dogs, they go out to potty
> and then Gio comes in for some fuss time (I mean
> the e***d circling around you,

That's *** BEHAVIOR cause he's been ABUSED.

Quote:
> you pet them and talk to them and OK, I even
> wiggle with them. Stop looking at me funny, you
> do it too). He will get an *** when they are
> fussing, and she says his *** comes out pretty
> far, and he stands hunched up, and he will quit
> walking around until it goes away.

You mean till he "finishes."

Quote:
> The problem is that it isn't going away soon.

Right.

Quote:
> She says these episodes run about 5 minutes, and
> during that time he will hobble to a corner and hide
> his head, or look at her (her words) as though he is
> ashamed.

RIGHT. That's the same same reason HOWE COME
you and your pals tell folks to KILLFILE The Puppy Wizard.

Quote:
>  I know that is anthropomorphizing,

Not at all. HOWEver, the dog is not "ashamed,"
he's FEARFUL he'll be PUNISHED for his behavior.

Quote:
> but it gives you a good mental picture nonetheless.

You been takin your medications? Perhaps they need
ROTATING?

Quote:
> To me, it sounds as though he is in great discomfort,

He's AFRAID. That's HOWE COME dogs "get e***d"
and "hump." It's strictly a neveHOWES behavior, an
anxiHOWESNESS relief mechanism.

Quote:
>  possibly pain, and he is looking at her
> (the alpha or just the caretaker) for help.

NHOWE THAT'S anthropomorphizing.

Quote:
> Charlie has given me that look before, if he has
> ever had poop issues and needs my assistance.
>  I have witnessed one of these *** episodes.
> She thinks it pretty much always happens when
> there is some e***ment going on,

AS STATED.

Quote:
>  usually when she has come home,

THAT'S when HOWER MENTALLY ILL DOG ABUSER'S
dogs are under the most STRESS. They FEAR being
PUNISHED for behaviors they did in their abuser's absence.

THAT'S HOWE COME dogs get "separation
anxiHOWESNESS."

Quote:
>  and it pretty much stops him from doing anything
> normal until it resolves itself.

Perhaps his tallywhacker is uncomfortably wrapped
in the sheath that sometimes rolls inward and causes
PAIN. All she's gotta do is*** it for him like a dog does.
Or she could just use her fingers to pull it back and let
it descend pupperly. Whatever she prefers.

Quote:
> I think so far, that is all the info she has given me.

There's NO NEED for further "info" abHOWET behavior
problems. The dog's ACTIONS tell us HOWE COME he's
GOT those BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS:

"It is by muteness that a dog becomes so utterly
beyond value. With him, words play no torturing
tricks.........., " John Galsworthy.

 Like a confessor Priest? Don't bet your dog won't
 tell on you... Their behaviors reflect our words,
actions, and training  quirks. Jerry HOWE, The
Puppy Wizard. <} ; ~ )   >

Quote:
> Basically he gets an *** that won't retract for
> a good five minutes.

Well, if it's GOOD...

Quote:

> I have already told her on multiple occasions to call
> the vet about it.

BWEEEAHAHAHAHAHAA!!!

Quote:
> I have the kind of relationship with my vet where I
> can call her about something and she will discuss
>  it with me without making us visit the office if unnecessary.

AMAZING?

Quote:
>  My mom says she is going to bring it up at Gio's yearly
> checkup, which isn't for another month. Has anybody ever
> experienced anything like this??

Most of your pals here have the same behavior problems.

Quote:
>   My only other suggestion was that she not fuss over
> them quite as much when she comes home.

RIGHT! YOU MEAN IGNORE THE DOG.

Quote:
> Perhaps other methods of showing affection,

You could do what professor SCRUFF SHAKE does
to his little dog Maxie The FuriHOWESLY Obsessive
Compulsive Masturbator... that only takes five minutes
to CURE his dog's OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER.

Quote:
>  like calm snuggling,

Yeah.. kinda like snuggling.

Quote:
> would be in order until the vet gives an opinion about it.

BWEEEEAHAHAHAHAAA!!!

The vet don't know NUTHIN abHOWET this cause
it ain't a VETERINARY PROBLEM it's a MENTAL
HEALTH CARE ISSUE.

Quote:
> Thanks in advance

BWEEHAHAHAHAHAHAAA!!!

Quote:
> Amy, Jim, Charlie, & Holly




Quote:

> Since I already have Howe killfiled I will go ahead and try
> to answer you...***collars carry with them a huge
> potential to injure your dog, especially if you are not
> experienced with using them. Pinch collars LOOK like
> medieval devices but actually do less 'damage' on your
> dog....they look crazy and mean but the title, "pinch" or
> "choke" collars, indicates what they do...personally I can
> tell you I would much rather be pinched than choked BUT if
> you know what you are doing and are careful with your
> training, a ***collar can be just as effective. PLEASE BE
> SURE that you do not leave your TRAINING collar on your dog
> at any time that you are not training the dog. Whether a
> ***or pinch collar, it is a TRAINING collar. It is not
> safe to leave either of these on a dog when s/he is
> unattended, nor is it safe to tie your dog up in the yard
> attached to one of these collars.

> We used a pinch collar on Charlie when training him because
> when we first got him, it was obvious that he had the run of
> the house with his old owners. He would pull like there was
> no tomorrow on a leash and being as he weighs almost as
> much as I do, this was not a good thing. Being a fairly
> *** young male dog, it was our trainer's opinion that a
> ***collar would not have nearly the effect on him.

> This may sound contrary to what I have already said (less pain
> less effect) but a pinch collar works by pinching the skin
> around the neck, which is sensitive. A ***collar works by
> duh, *** the dog.

> Charlie has so much muscle around his neck
> that this would have had little effect on him, added to the
> fact that if he pulled while wearing a ***collar, he was
> going to ***himself, or cause neck damage. Pinch collars
> are also referred to as self-correcting collars because if
> the dog pulls, they get a correction.

> I hope this has clarified matters a bit for you.

> Amy, Jim & Charlie

============




- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> This has got me rolling on the floor, reading all
> these "my dog never ate anything" stories.

> Holly has eaten, in no particular order:

> Shoes (multiple pairs)
> Flip-Flops
> baseball cap
> Tissues/TP
> Q-tips
> manicure sticks
> pillow stuffing
> soap
> drywall
> hygiene products
> least of all feces

> and who knows what else we are forgetting....

> Amy, Jim, Charlie & Holly (Charlie, on the other hand,
> has never eaten anything that wasn't food)

---------------------------------------------

BWWWAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!!



Quote:
> This is TOO funny! We love (sarcasm) coming home to Charlie
> greeting us with those puppy dog eyes when *oops* we've left
> something out on the counter and he knows he's been *bad*
> ...invariably he gets into bread if we've been stupid enough
> to leave it out for him....it's a toss-up to us being lazy
> and putting him in his crate and putting the food away and
> letting him have free run of the house....oh well...

> Amy, Jim and Charlie (who still hasn't figured out why we
> yell at the trash or bread occasionally)

===========
 
 
 

Male dog's excitement seems painful

Post by The Puppy Wizar » Tue, 13 Jan 2004 01:34:55


HOWEDY madeline,


Quote:

> I don't have anything to offer,

RIGHT! You're a closet dog abuser liar and MENTAL CASE.

Quote:
>  but I'm sure I wasn't the only one that giggled
> reading your post.

Perhaps your meds need rotating?

Quote:
>   I'm sorry.  :-)

Yes, INDEED.

Quote:
>  I know it's a serious question that deserves a serious
> answer, but I don't have a clue.

Goddamned tootin.

Quote:
>  Hope you let us know what her vet says about it.

BWEEEEHAHAHAHAHAHAAA!!!

HOWEDY People,

Here's HOWE COME dogs GET behavior and temperament
problems:

"> personally I can tell you I would much rather be pinched

Quote:
> than choked BUT if you know what you are doing and are
> careful with your training, a ***collar can be just as
> effective."



Quote:

> There is hardly a person on this newsgroup that hasn't had a
> problem with Jerry. He will attack you with unwanted advice
> until you block/filter him along the lines of how Lori
> instructs...
> Most of us have already  killfiled/filtered/blocked Jerry and
> we don't even notice his pestering anymore....It used to be
> that you'd log on to the newsgroup to find messages from
> Jerry and then reply messages from whoever he'd wrote to
> asking him to stop.

> If you find that his incredibly annoying tactics are not so
> annoying, and you find that his advice helps, by all means,
> ignore the rest of us. But if you find it a problem, like
> the rest of us, join the club.

> Amy, Jim and Charlie




- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Since I already have Howe killfiled I will go ahead and try
> to answer you...***collars carry with them a huge
> potential to injure your dog, especially if you are not
> experienced with using them.

>  Pinch collars LOOK like  medieval devices but actually
> do less 'damage' on your dog....they look crazy and mean
> but the title, "pinch" or  "choke" collars, indicates what they
> do...
> personally I can tell you I would much rather be pinched
> than choked BUT if you know what you are doing and are
> careful with your training, a ***collar can be just as
> effective.

>  PLEASE BE SURE that you do not leave your TRAINING
> collar on your dog at any time that you are not training the
> dog. Whether a ***or pinch collar, it is a TRAINING collar.
> It is not  safe to leave either of these on a dog when s/he is
> unattended, nor is it safe to tie your dog up in the yard
> attached to one of these collars.

> We used a pinch collar on Charlie when training him because
> when we first got him, it was obvious that he had the run of
> the house with his old owners.

>  He would pull like there was no tomorrow on a leash and
> being as he weighs almost as much as I do, this was not a
> good thing.

> Being a fairly *** young male dog, it was our
> trainer's opinion that a ***collar would not have
> nearly the effect on him.

> This may sound contrary to what I have already said (less
> pain less effect) but a pinch collar works by pinching the
> skin around the neck, which is sensitive. A ***collar
> works by duh, *** the dog.

> Charlie has so much muscle around his neck that this would
> have had little effect on him, added to the fact that if he
> pulled while wearing a ***collar, he was going to ***
> himself, or cause neck damage. Pinch collars are also
> referred to as self-correcting collars because if the dog
> pulls, they get a correction.

> I hope this has clarified matters a bit for you.

> Amy, Jim & Charlie

============




Quote:
> This has got me rolling on the floor, reading all these "my
> dog never ate anything" stories.

> Holly has eaten, in no particular order:

> Shoes (multiple pairs) Flip-Flops baseball cap Tissues/TP
> Q-tips manicure sticks pillow stuffing soap drywall hygiene
> products least of all feces

> and who knows what else we are forgetting....

> Amy, Jim, Charlie & Holly (Charlie, on the other hand, has
> never eaten anything that wasn't food)

---------------------------------------------

BWWWAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!!



Quote:
> This is TOO funny! We love (sarcasm) coming home to Charlie
> greeting us with those puppy dog eyes when *oops* we've left
> something out on the counter and he knows he's been *bad*
> ...invariably he gets into bread if we've been stupid enough
> to leave it out for him....it's a toss-up to us being lazy
> and putting him in his crate and putting the food away and
> letting him have free run of the house....oh well...

> Amy, Jim and Charlie (who still hasn't figured out why we
> yell at the trash or bread occasionally)

===========
 
 
 

Male dog's excitement seems painful

Post by The Puppy Wizar » Wed, 14 Jan 2004 01:14:02


HOWEDY susan,

Dogs get ***s because of ANXIETY, not LOVE.


Quote:
> "Amy, Jim, Charlie & Holly" <> wrote in >message >  I am writing
about one
> of my >mom's dogs, Gio. He is> a labX, we think >mixed with
shepherd but we
> are not sure.  >Gio has a rather disturbing> problem of
>e***ment. He is
> fixed, but gets ***s  >fairly often.

> Well, all my neutered male dogs get ***s when they get that
extra
> petting.
> Um, I just reread that sentence and it's not like it sounds but
I'm trying
> not to laugh as I type.
> I mean that e***d greeting petting that says you are so happy
to see them.
> One dog was neutered at three month, and others usually six
months and an
> occasional ***.
> If he really is "stuck" out and it appears painful, it should be
checked.  I
> remember someone bringing in a male that had been out for a day
and in
> danger.
> If it just last for a few moments, I wouldn't be too concerned.
Your mom
> could change her behavior and tend to ignore him a bit more when
first
> coming home, then when the dog relaxes, have their "special"
times. <grin>
> Sue
> Northern Wisconsin
> remove YOURPAWS when replying