Introducing myself

Description of your first forum.

Introducing myself

Post by Steve Walke » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Hello all.  Just subscribed to this group this morning as a place to
find tips on looking after our soon-to-be-arriving dog, Samson.  Sam is
a rescue pup just under 6 months old that we're getting from the local
RSPCA shelter.  They came and did the home visit yesterday and approved
the premises, and Samson is being neutered today (poor feller), so we
can pick him up this coming Sunday (we've already got his bed, lead,
food/water bowls etc ready for his arrival).  He's a gingerish tan,
spaniel-sized cross-breed dog with a loveable face, pretty short-haired,
extremely friendly, seems very even-tempered.  Our friend, who got a dog
from the shelter about a year ago, told us that there would be one dog
that just stood out from the others and said, 'Me, me, I'm your dog!',
which I was doubtful about - but there was no doubt that Samson was this
dog for us!

To let you know a little bit about us, I'm almost 35, and have never had
a dog since I was about 7, as my parents are not keen on pets at all.  I
had a problem with allergic reactions to dog hair or being***ed, so I
couldn't have a dog after I moved out either, but I seem to have grown
out of it lately (certainly Samson doesn't cause a reaction, since
whenever we've visited him I've made sure he gets to climb on me,***
me etc and no problem).

My wife, Kathy, grew up with dogs though initially she wasn't too keen
on the idea of getting one now, but having fallen for Samson she's now -
like the rest of us - really e***d about his arrival.

We have 3 kids: David, 13; Anna 11; Rachel 10 this weekend.  Rachie was
the prime 'mover and shaker' who has always wanted a dog and who pressed
the idea until we all came to agree with her. :)  But the others are now
100% converted as well!

We've got some booklets etc from the shelter about training/caring for
dogs and understanding their pack-mentality etc, and from the vet about
de-flea-ing, worming, and so on.  But if anyone has any 'must-know' tips
about making a good start in making Sam settle and feel at home,
establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear them.

Cheers!
--
Steve Walker
http://www.moonsgarden.com/

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Christine Gardne » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hi Steve, congratulations on your new dog, and give yourself a pat on the
back for saving a life by adopting a shelter dog.  Sam is very lucky to have
found such a caring family.

Sounds like you're doing everything right so far.  In your message, you ask
what else you could do.  My own suggestion would be to enrol in a basic
obedience class as soon as possible.  Not only will this be great fun, but
the "hands on" training experience is essential for new dog owners.  Look
around for a trainer who uses methods you feel comfortable with - you'll
find everything from ***chains to reward-based approaches - and make sure
the whole family can be involved.

The classes really will pay dividends for you.  They'll help the dog bond
with your family and accept you as the new "masters", and they'll help
establish a structure and some groundrules so that he functions well within
your household.  It's hard to get the same results using books, especially
for less experienced owners, and not least, the trainer will set you on the
right track and correct any early handling mistakes before they become
ingrained.

Best of luck with Sam, and above all, enjoy him!

Christine

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Chris Willia » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


  Congratulations, Steve!  To your whole family. You'll find some
knowledgable people here.
  My #1 tip  is related to a post from Diane about Tsuki's noisy
encounter with a trash can (How's that post named?), and the way Diane
handled it.  Make sure Samson's first experience with _everything is a
pleasant one.   A bad encounter will haunt him (and you) forever.
 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by twil.. » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hello all.  Just subscribed to this group this morning as a place to
> find tips on looking after our soon-to-be-arriving dog, Samson.

Howdy! Welcome. But be warned; we're an uppity lot at times. Except for
me, of course; I'm a complete angel.

Quote:
> Sam is a rescue pup just under 6 months old that we're getting from
> the local RSPCA shelter.

Yay! I'll bet you and your young ones are pretty e***d.

Quote:
> We've got some booklets etc from the shelter about training/caring for
> dogs and understanding their pack-mentality etc, and from the vet
> about de-flea-ing, worming, and so on.  But if anyone has any
> 'must-know' tips about making a good start in making Sam settle and
> feel at home, establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear
> them.

Well, I'm no expert, so I'll just post the links of two of my favorite
dog related pages:

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
http://www.moonsgarden.com/

Those should keep you busy for a while. Study hard, there will be a
quiz later.

And of course _MY_ shelter mutt can be found at:
http://www.moonsgarden.com/~twillis/Harlan/harlan.html

--Terri & Harlan

--
I don't give references, and I
don't offer credentials.

--Jerry Howe 8/19/99

Sent via Deja.com http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Jerry How » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hello all.  Just subscribed to this group this morning as a place to
> find tips on looking after our soon-to-be-arriving dog, Samson.  Sam is
> a rescue pup just under 6 months old that we're getting from the local
> RSPCA shelter.  They came and did the home visit yesterday and approved
> the premises, and Samson is being neutered today (poor feller), so we
> can pick him up this coming Sunday (we've already got his bed, lead,
> food/water bowls etc ready for his arrival).  He's a gingerish tan,
> spaniel-sized cross-breed dog with a loveable face, pretty short-haired,
> extremely friendly, seems very even-tempered.  Our friend, who got a dog
> from the shelter about a year ago, told us that there would be one dog
> that just stood out from the others and said, 'Me, me, I'm your dog!',
> which I was doubtful about - but there was no doubt that Samson was this
> dog for us!

> To let you know a little bit about us, I'm almost 35, and have never had
> a dog since I was about 7, as my parents are not keen on pets at all.  I
> had a problem with allergic reactions to dog hair or being***ed, so I
> couldn't have a dog after I moved out either, but I seem to have grown
> out of it lately (certainly Samson doesn't cause a reaction, since
> whenever we've visited him I've made sure he gets to climb on me,***
> me etc and no problem).

> My wife, Kathy, grew up with dogs though initially she wasn't too keen
> on the idea of getting one now, but having fallen for Samson she's now -
> like the rest of us - really e***d about his arrival.

> We have 3 kids: David, 13; Anna 11; Rachel 10 this weekend.  Rachie was
> the prime 'mover and shaker' who has always wanted a dog and who pressed
> the idea until we all came to agree with her. :)  But the others are now
> 100% converted as well!

> We've got some booklets etc from the shelter about training/caring for
> dogs and understanding their pack-mentality etc, and from the vet about
> de-flea-ing, worming, and so on.  But if anyone has any 'must-know' tips
> about making a good start in making Sam settle and feel at home,
> establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear them.

> Cheers!
> --
> Steve Walker
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/

Forget about the *** talk that they've introduced you to, they'll have
you confronting your pup and trying to force control of behavior that will
cause stress and anxiety rather than teaching you to properly communicate
with your new pup.

You can get all of the information you need to properly handle and train
your dog in the Wits' End Dog Training Method manual available for free at
http://www.moonsgarden.com/

;-) DRAINING THE SWAMP, AND RELOCATING THE GATORS... J>>>

"CUSTOM WILL RECONCILE PEOPLE TO ANY ATROCITY." G.B. Shaw.

"I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the
greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious
truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which
they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly taught to others,
and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their
lives."
                                             Leo Tolstoy

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated more
complaints to my personal email than any other controversial post I have
made to date, bar none?:
                                            caveat
If you have to do things to your dog to train him, that you would
rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing them. If you
have a dog trainer that tells you to jerk your dog around, ***him,
pinch his ears, or twist his toes, shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, or
punish him in any manner, that corrections are appropriate, that the
dog won't think of you as the punisher, or that corrections are not
harmful, or if they can't train your dog to do what you want, look for a
trainer that knows Howe.

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Wits' End Dog Training

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
                      -Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a problem,
bungle it and make it more difficult for all who come after.  Who
ever can't hit the nail on the head should, please, not hit at all.
                     -Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are learned
qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged, develop
and continue to grow exponentially, to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on praising split
seconds of canine thought, strategy, and timing, not mindless hours of
forced repetition, constant corrections, and scolding.
                  -Jerry Howe-

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Adrienne Caldwel » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Here is the url for a website that starts with all the basics
http://www.moonsgarden.com/
web design excellent; making reading more enjoyable.  It's not likely to
overwhelm a new dog owner with a wealth of information.

In the section on tips at http://www.moonsgarden.com/
I would read the articles -

The Right Way to Train a Dog
Bonding with Your Dog
Body Language

After that he recommends too many things I disagree with - so read the
articles that follow if you wish; maybe it will also give an idea as to
some things not to do to your dog.

First of all he lists a squirt gun as an effective training aid - would you
have wanted your parents to use a squirt gun to train you?

Second there is a lot of emphasise on training with corrective jerks with a
***collar.  I do not believing in lead training with a ***collar (and
here this is not to say anything against professionals who are able to
train in this way without the dog thinking of it as punishment - its just
not a good method for a beginner without the guidance of a training class
imho ) - always use a soft nylon or leather collar while teaching.  Think
of it more like gentle leading - using the leash and collar to lead your
dog gently.

Here the trainer also recommends the corrective jerk with a ***collar to
train a puppy not to mouth.  If this is a behavior you encounter with your
dog the best method is for you and your children to let out a high pitched
puppy like yelp (ooowwwh) everytime he nips your hand during a play
session.  This is teaching the dog through his natural ability for
compassion rather than another training technique that corrects the
behavior without showing the "why."  The yelping method is more
understandlable to a dog, and again teaches him to start thinking about how
some of his behavior can affect others.

With all rescue dogs the most common training difficulties encountered are
mouthing, housetraining, destruction of objects, furniture and the house
itself caused by seperation anxiety, and pulling when outside on a lead to
the point where the dog's safety is in jeopardy.  Another problem is the
dog getting lost or running away from a public dog play area when he is let
off the leash too early.

With regard to housetraining and destruction related to seperation anxiety
- a crate is a great thing to introduce your dog to slowly in a new
environment as it gives him a sense of security.  Just having it there with
the door open, a nice blanket inside, with some of his favorite toys will
probably be a source of comfort to him.  Introduce him to it with positive
associations - feeding him in it, putting treats in it and giving him a lot
of praise when he is in it helps.  After he starts to think of it as his
little home and goes in on his own you could try closing the door and
leaving for a minute to test his reaction - that is if housetraining or
seperation anxiety related destruction is a problem.

With regard to the pulling problem - many of my rescues were initially
extreme pullers.  Some pulled so hard that the metal clasp which attached
to the collar broke.  Unfortuneatly one of my dogs was hit by a car and
died because of this.  The way I protect any rescue until I am able to
train them not to pull is with a double safety - a harness and a collar.  I
attach a rope to the leash and a add metal clasp to the end of the rope -
so one clasp attaches to the harness and the other to the collar.  That way
if the leash seperates from the harness there is still the attachment to
the collar.  I also further secure the leash to a tie around my waist so if
my hand looses a grip there is still the attachment to the waist.  But this
is primarily necessary because I am walking so many dogs at once.

But all that is only necessary if pulling is a problem.  There are many
other recommendations that could be made for any of the above specific
problems you may encounter - so feel free to post to this newsgroup with
any questions.

The most important thing overall is helping your dog to develop self
confidence and feel loved.

Good luck and thank you for adopting a dog that someone else may have given
up on.

Adrienne

Quote:

> Hello all.  Just subscribed to this group this morning as a place to
> find tips on looking after our soon-to-be-arriving dog, Samson.  Sam is
> a rescue pup just under 6 months old that we're getting from the local
> RSPCA shelter.  They came and did the home visit yesterday and approved
> the premises, and Samson is being neutered today (poor feller), so we
> can pick him up this coming Sunday (we've already got his bed, lead,
> food/water bowls etc ready for his arrival).  He's a gingerish tan,
> spaniel-sized cross-breed dog with a loveable face, pretty short-haired,
> extremely friendly, seems very even-tempered.  Our friend, who got a dog
> from the shelter about a year ago, told us that there would be one dog
> that just stood out from the others and said, 'Me, me, I'm your dog!',
> which I was doubtful about - but there was no doubt that Samson was this
> dog for us!

> To let you know a little bit about us, I'm almost 35, and have never had
> a dog since I was about 7, as my parents are not keen on pets at all.  I
> had a problem with allergic reactions to dog hair or being***ed, so I
> couldn't have a dog after I moved out either, but I seem to have grown
> out of it lately (certainly Samson doesn't cause a reaction, since
> whenever we've visited him I've made sure he gets to climb on me,***
> me etc and no problem).

> My wife, Kathy, grew up with dogs though initially she wasn't too keen
> on the idea of getting one now, but having fallen for Samson she's now -
> like the rest of us - really e***d about his arrival.

> We have 3 kids: David, 13; Anna 11; Rachel 10 this weekend.  Rachie was
> the prime 'mover and shaker' who has always wanted a dog and who pressed
> the idea until we all came to agree with her. :)  But the others are now
> 100% converted as well!

> We've got some booklets etc from the shelter about training/caring for
> dogs and understanding their pack-mentality etc, and from the vet about
> de-flea-ing, worming, and so on.  But if anyone has any 'must-know' tips
> about making a good start in making Sam settle and feel at home,
> establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear them.

> Cheers!
> --
> Steve Walker
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Donald E. Scot » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> .>  But if anyone has any
> > 'must-know' tips about making a good start in making Sam settle and
> > feel at home, establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear
> > them.

Two books that I found to be really helpful are:  "The Art Of Raising A
Puppy" and "How To Be Your Dog's Best Friend", both by the Monks of New
Skete.
    One thing to remember is that, usually when the dog does something
unacceptable like peeing on the floor or chewing the furniture, it's the
owner's fault and not the dog's.  If you crate train your pup and make sure
that he goes out after eating, sleeping and playing and see that he goes out
often enough, he won't be having accidents.  If he does have an accident, do
not scold him unless you catch him in the act, and then only mildly. When
you scold a dog he thinks it's for what he is doing that very second.  It
the dog takes off and you scold him when he comes back, he will think he is
being scolded for coming back. Positive reinforcement is always best.
    If your dog chews on things it is usually because he is bored.  Make
sure he gets plenty of exercise and has plenty of toys to chew on.  If he
puts his mouth on something unacceptable replace it with a toy to chew on.
I think the most important thing is to give him a lot of love and attention
so he feels secure and wants to please his master.  Making sure that he
knows who is master is also important so, when you correct him, look him
right in the eye and speak to him strongly enough so he gets the message.
This balanced with the love will make him a wonderful pet.  Good luck with
Samson
Annis-Murphy's Mom
 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Baz » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


:And of course _MY_ shelter mutt can be found at:
:http://www.moonsgarden.com/~twillis/Harlan/harlan.html
:
i read your "conversation with harlan" and thought i'd add what happens when
i get home

Me: Hello, I'm home!
Wookie: God, I suppose your going to say hello to HER first!
Tess: It's you, it's you, I love you so much!!!
Me: Sit!
Tess: (runs around, unable to sit still) You're home!!!! I love you!
Wookie: She can't even sit!!! AND I know you're going to say hello to her
first.  I'm going to have to sort this myself (grabs tess's collar)
Me: (loudly) I said Sit!
Wookie: (sits) God, you're shouting at me now
Me: Good boy wookie, hello (makes fuss of wookie)
Tess: Be nice to me!!! I love you! (Tess jumps up and tries to*** my face)
Wookie: See, I knew it, I knew you'd say hello to her first (Wookie walks
off in a huff, and sulks for ten minutes)
Tess finally sits now that she's seen Wookie off.

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Jerry How » Wed, 13 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> > .>  But if anyone has any
> > > 'must-know' tips about making a good start in making Sam settle and
> > > feel at home, establishing ***, etc, I'd be delighted to hear
> > > them.

> Two books that I found to be really helpful are:  "The Art Of Raising A
> Puppy" and "How To Be Your Dog's Best Friend", both by the Monks of New
> Skete.
>     One thing to remember is that, usually when the dog does something
> unacceptable like peeing on the floor or chewing the furniture, it's the
> owner's fault and not the dog's.  If you crate train your pup and make sure
> that he goes out after eating, sleeping and playing and see that he goes out
> often enough, he won't be having accidents.  If he does have an accident, do
> not scold him unless you catch him in the act, and then only mildly. When
> you scold a dog he thinks it's for what he is doing that very second.  It
> the dog takes off and you scold him when he comes back, he will think he is
> being scolded for coming back. Positive reinforcement is always best.
>     If your dog chews on things it is usually because he is bored.  Make
> sure he gets plenty of exercise and has plenty of toys to chew on.  If he
> puts his mouth on something unacceptable replace it with a toy to chew on.
> I think the most important thing is to give him a lot of love and attention
> so he feels secure and wants to please his master.  Making sure that he
> knows who is master is also important so, when you correct him, look him
> right in the eye and speak to him strongly enough so he gets the message.
> This balanced with the love will make him a wonderful pet.  Good luck with
> Samson
> Annis-Murphy's Mom

It is your kind of advice that causes behavior problems in dogs. The
MonkeysofNotsoNewSkeete are a bunch of heavy handed louts that enjoy abusing
dogs. Look at their web site, they are proud of spending three months jerking
around dogs, and calling it rehabilitation.

It's too bad that you only understand being a control freak and using
***/agressive methods to "train" your dogs.

Don't bother trying to learn appropriate methods to handle and train. The good
old jerk and ***and punish and confront method will make you look intelligent
and Powerful. Won't it???
;-) DRAINING THE SWAMP, AND RELOCATING THE GATORS... J>>>

"CUSTOM WILL RECONCILE PEOPLE TO ANY ATROCITY." G.B. Shaw.

"I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the
greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious
truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which
they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly taught to others,
and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their
lives."
                                             Leo Tolstoy

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated more
complaints to my personal email than any other controversial post I have
made to date, bar none?:
                                            caveat
If you have to do things to your dog to train him, that you would
rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing them. If you
have a dog trainer that tells you to jerk your dog around, ***him,
pinch his ears, or twist his toes, shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, or
punish him in any manner, that corrections are appropriate, that the
dog won't think of you as the punisher, or that corrections are not
harmful, or if they can't train your dog to do what you want, look for a
trainer that knows Howe.

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Wits' End Dog Training

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
                      -Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a problem,
bungle it and make it more difficult for all who come after.  Who
ever can't hit the nail on the head should, please, not hit at all.
                     -Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are learned
qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged, develop
and continue to grow exponentially, to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on praising split
seconds of canine thought, strategy, and timing, not mindless hours of
forced repetition, constant corrections, and scolding.
                  -Jerry Howe-

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Rick & Lis » Thu, 14 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Welcome and good luck!

Rick & Lisa

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Jerry How » Thu, 14 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hello Christine,

Most people give more consideration to howe they prepare their vegetables than
you are recommending giving toward raising and training dogs.

There are right ways and wrong ways of doing everything. If you don't wash your
mushrooms thoroughly, it isn't going to kill you. But if you eat the wrong ones,
Sionarrah, you're history... Same with dog training.

Quote:
> Hi Steve, congratulations on your new dog, and give yourself a pat on the
> back for saving a life by adopting a shelter dog.  Sam is very lucky to have
> found such a caring family.

Why would a caring family want to subject their children to observing their dog
being jerked around and choked?

Quote:

> Sounds like you're doing everything right so far.  In your message, you ask
> what else you could do.  My own suggestion would be to enrol in a basic
> obedience class as soon as possible.  Not only will this be great fun, but
> the "hands on" training experience is essential for new dog owners.

Group dog training classes can be fun, and sometimes you will find some good
ones. On the whole, excellent group classes are a rarity. Dogs and handlers
cannot learn going around in circles and working under the command of a trainer
saying everybody heel, everybody sit, etc., because everybody does not work at
the same speed. When you need to address a mistake, timing is crucial, and you
cannot learn to properly handle teaching the dog, if you've got to keep pace
with the rest of the class. I train group classes, but I don't work everyone as
a group. Everyone works on their own, at their own speed.

Learning howe to properly handle and train a dog takes a kinesthetic sense for
reacting to situations as they are presented. This is not something you will
develop through watching other people that are performing at various levels of
proficiency. I seldom demonstrate for my students, because it will only
frustrate them, when they are not able to do the same without the practice it
requires. You are used to another approach, where all you need  to learn is howe
to snap the leash to force the dog to work. That ain't training.

Quote:
>  Look
> around for a trainer who uses methods you feel comfortable with - you'll
> find everything from ***chains to reward-based approaches - and make sure
> the whole family can be involved.

It is beyond comprehension that someone would say just pick a method that suites
you. Just try anything till you find out what works for you. That is the poorest
advice that I've ever heard.

Quote:

> The classes really will pay dividends for you.

Probably not. The hidden costs of obedience lessons are that you will not likely
find a
competent trainer, and the misinformation and improper methods for handling your
dog will last longer than the "training" that you and he does learn.

Quote:
> They'll help the dog bond
> with your family and accept you as the new "masters", and they'll help
> establish a structure and some groundrules so that he functions well within
> your household.

That's the way it is supposed to be, but usually that is not the case. Read the
Oscar goes back to school post. That is more typical of the results you'll get
at group classes. More classes, and more classes, and years of behavior problems
that are being shuffled around, rather than learning proper handling and
training techniques that will end the need for more classes.

Quote:
>  It's hard to get the same results using books, especially
> for less experienced owners, and not least, the trainer will set you on the
> right track and correct any early handling mistakes before they become
> ingrained.

That has not been my observation. Usually you'll find a heavy handed control
freak that insists on confronting and punishing behaviors until the dog is a
mess. The mishandling techniques that will be learned will take tremendous
effort to unlearn.

Quote:

> Best of luck with Sam, and above all, enjoy him!

Luck is abundant but risky. I'd recommend you rely on the information in the
Wits' End Dog Training Method manual and save yourself a bunch of trouble and a
pocketful of money, and do the work yourself. The Wits' End Dog Training Method
manual is available for free at  http://www.moonsgarden.com/

Quote:
> Christine

;-) DRAINING THE SWAMP, AND RELOCATING THE GATORS... J>>>

"CUSTOM WILL RECONCILE PEOPLE TO ANY ATROCITY." G.B. Shaw.

"I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the
greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious
truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which
they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly taught to others,
and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their
lives."
                                             Leo Tolstoy

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated more
complaints to my personal email than any other controversial post I have
made to date, bar none?:
                                            caveat
If you have to do things to your dog to train him, that you would
rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing them. If you
have a dog trainer that tells you to jerk your dog around, ***him,
pinch his ears, or twist his toes, shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, or
punish him in any manner, that corrections are appropriate, that the
dog won't think of you as the punisher, or that corrections are not
harmful, or if they can't train your dog to do what you want, look for a
trainer that knows Howe.

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Wits' End Dog Training

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
                      -Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a problem,
bungle it and make it more difficult for all who come after.  Who
ever can't hit the nail on the head should, please, not hit at all.
                     -Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are learned
qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged, develop
and continue to grow exponentially, to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on praising split
seconds of canine thought, strategy, and timing, not mindless hours of
forced repetition, constant corrections, and scolding.
                  -Jerry Howe-

 
 
 

Introducing myself

Post by Chris Willia » Thu, 14 Oct 1999 04:00:00


   Steve, everyone is recommending classes.  Since you have a bit of
time, go to different ones and observe.  If something looks wrong to
you, walk.  Don't think the trainer is right because s\he is
experienced.
Quote:
>I train group classes, but I don't work
> everyone as a group. Everyone works
> on their own, at their own speed.

-----------------------------  
   Jerry is right.  If you see a "everybody do this" approach be
suspicious.  My trainer-friend never takes more than 5 in a class,
everybody works separately as she circulates.  Looking across and seeing
another owner-dog can give you a living good or bad example.
   Selecting the right trainer is a very important decision; don't make
it lightly.