Potty training problem

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Potty training problem

Post by Caroly » Sat, 15 Dec 2001 22:50:43



Hi!  I've posted before, about my dog, Shasta, and you've always given me
wonderful advice.  I need help again.

Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out trying
to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making a
mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning the
crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

Shasta goes outside with our older dog.  Star makes a noise so we know when
he has to go.  Shasta does nothing, so we take him out every two hours.  If
we aren't at home, he has to wear a muzzle, but has free run of the house,
and uses his pad.

The problem I'm having now is that we've had to close our bedroom off to the
dogs.  We used to let them both go in and lay on the bed during the day, but
Shasta started tearing the blankets and sheets, so we had to shut them out.

Now, every morning when I go upstairs to wake my youngest daughter for
school, Shasta has pooped in the hallway in front of the closed door.  I
have told him no and that he's a bad dog, and I know he understands from the
way he slinks away when I speak to him.  If he's upstairs, he tries to get
away before I notice.  He only does it in the morning, even if he's already
gone outside and pooped there.  If by some miracle he hasn't gone, I tell
him what a good dog he is and give him a treat.

My questions are:  how do I make him stop pooping in the hall without
reopening my bedroom, and how do I teach him to let us know when he has to
go out, the way Star does?

Shasta is really a kind & loving puppy, and when you look at how far he's
come, I really don't mind the pad, or the upstairs pooping (it's easy to
clean).  However, my boyfriend feels that since his perfect dog Star never
does anything wrong, mine can be trained to be perfect, too.  I think it's
just the difference in age - Star is a chocolate lab that's 9, and Shasta
hasn't even had his first birthday yet.  I would appreciate any and all
suggestions.

Thanks,
Carolyn

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by roo » Mon, 17 Dec 2001 19:30:16



Quote:
> Hi!  I've posted before, about my dog, Shasta, and you've always given me
> wonderful advice.  I need help again.

> Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out trying
> to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making a
> mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning
the
> crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> Shasta goes outside with our older dog.  Star makes a noise so we know
when
> he has to go.  Shasta does nothing, so we take him out every two hours.
If
> we aren't at home, he has to wear a muzzle, but has free run of the house,
> and uses his pad.

> The problem I'm having now is that we've had to close our bedroom off to
the
> dogs.  We used to let them both go in and lay on the bed during the day,
but
> Shasta started tearing the blankets and sheets, so we had to shut them
out.

> Now, every morning when I go upstairs to wake my youngest daughter for
> school, Shasta has pooped in the hallway in front of the closed door.  I
> have told him no and that he's a bad dog, and I know he understands from
the
> way he slinks away when I speak to him.  If he's upstairs, he tries to get
> away before I notice.  He only does it in the morning, even if he's
already
> gone outside and pooped there.  If by some miracle he hasn't gone, I tell
> him what a good dog he is and give him a treat.

> My questions are:  how do I make him stop pooping in the hall without
> reopening my bedroom, and how do I teach him to let us know when he has to
> go out, the way Star does?

> Shasta is really a kind & loving puppy, and when you look at how far he's
> come, I really don't mind the pad, or the upstairs pooping (it's easy to
> clean).  However, my boyfriend feels that since his perfect dog Star never
> does anything wrong, mine can be trained to be perfect, too.  I think it's
> just the difference in age - Star is a chocolate lab that's 9, and Shasta
> hasn't even had his first birthday yet.  I would appreciate any and all
> suggestions.

> Thanks,
> Carolyn

Hi Carolyn,

Most behaviorists argue that dogs don't know when they have 'done wrong' esp
if it was a while back, they just 'look guilty' as a reaction to the sight
and sound of their owner being annoyed.

If Shasta is pooping regularly in the moring, try pre-empting him, and
taking him out beforehand. He is less likely to poop if empty. Take him of a
fairly long walk, so he can poop more than once if he needs to. Or play an
active game with him outside - activity tends to help dogs 'go' faster. Dogs
have their own timetable, and you could keep track of when he needs to go
more often, and take him out more often, with praise when he performs. Dogs
may naturally be able to last 8 hrs for part of a 24-hr cycle, but at other
times of the day need to go much more often. Mine need to go at least every
two hours in the early evening, when their bowels seem especially active.

He may already be trying to tell you when he needs to go, so see if he does
anything unusual, like trying to climb or your lap, before giving you a
little 'present'. It's not just you trying to teach him, but also trying to
understand what he is telling you.

Ian Dunbar has written an inexpensive guide to dog behavior (title is just
'Dog behavior', and a good book on training dogs ('How to teach a new dog
old tricks') which it might be worthwhile your reading, esp if you can get
hold of them from a library.

Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Caroly » Tue, 18 Dec 2001 19:43:28


Thanks Roo!

Shasta always uses his puppy pad, unless the bedroom door is closed, at
which point he poops right in front of it, as if he's mad that we closed him
out.

We left the door open this weekend and there was no problem, but he ate
another blanket.

I need him to use his pad if the bedroom door is shut, and get over the fact
that his daily diet doesn't include a piece of my bedding!

Thanks,
Carolyn  :-)


Quote:



> > Hi!  I've posted before, about my dog, Shasta, and you've always given
me
> > wonderful advice.  I need help again.

> > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
trying
> > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making
a
> > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning
> the
> > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > Shasta goes outside with our older dog.  Star makes a noise so we know
> when
> > he has to go.  Shasta does nothing, so we take him out every two hours.
> If
> > we aren't at home, he has to wear a muzzle, but has free run of the
house,
> > and uses his pad.

> > The problem I'm having now is that we've had to close our bedroom off to
> the
> > dogs.  We used to let them both go in and lay on the bed during the day,
> but
> > Shasta started tearing the blankets and sheets, so we had to shut them
> out.

> > Now, every morning when I go upstairs to wake my youngest daughter for
> > school, Shasta has pooped in the hallway in front of the closed door.  I
> > have told him no and that he's a bad dog, and I know he understands from
> the
> > way he slinks away when I speak to him.  If he's upstairs, he tries to
get
> > away before I notice.  He only does it in the morning, even if he's
> already
> > gone outside and pooped there.  If by some miracle he hasn't gone, I
tell
> > him what a good dog he is and give him a treat.

> > My questions are:  how do I make him stop pooping in the hall without
> > reopening my bedroom, and how do I teach him to let us know when he has
to
> > go out, the way Star does?

> > Shasta is really a kind & loving puppy, and when you look at how far
he's
> > come, I really don't mind the pad, or the upstairs pooping (it's easy to
> > clean).  However, my boyfriend feels that since his perfect dog Star
never
> > does anything wrong, mine can be trained to be perfect, too.  I think
it's
> > just the difference in age - Star is a chocolate lab that's 9, and
Shasta
> > hasn't even had his first birthday yet.  I would appreciate any and all
> > suggestions.

> > Thanks,
> > Carolyn

> Hi Carolyn,

> Most behaviorists argue that dogs don't know when they have 'done wrong'
esp
> if it was a while back, they just 'look guilty' as a reaction to the sight
> and sound of their owner being annoyed.

> If Shasta is pooping regularly in the moring, try pre-empting him, and
> taking him out beforehand. He is less likely to poop if empty. Take him of
a
> fairly long walk, so he can poop more than once if he needs to. Or play an
> active game with him outside - activity tends to help dogs 'go' faster.
Dogs
> have their own timetable, and you could keep track of when he needs to go
> more often, and take him out more often, with praise when he performs.
Dogs
> may naturally be able to last 8 hrs for part of a 24-hr cycle, but at
other
> times of the day need to go much more often. Mine need to go at least
every
> two hours in the early evening, when their bowels seem especially active.

> He may already be trying to tell you when he needs to go, so see if he
does
> anything unusual, like trying to climb or your lap, before giving you a
> little 'present'. It's not just you trying to teach him, but also trying
to
> understand what he is telling you.

> Ian Dunbar has written an inexpensive guide to dog behavior (title is just
> 'Dog behavior', and a good book on training dogs ('How to teach a new dog
> old tricks') which it might be worthwhile your reading, esp if you can get
> hold of them from a library.

> Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Diana aka Fat bottom Gi » Tue, 18 Dec 2001 21:54:29


Quote:

> Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out trying
> to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making a
> mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning the
> crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden Retriever????
(Still Googling) :(
 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Stu » Wed, 19 Dec 2001 03:31:51


This isn't the best solution, but how about putting the pads down in front
of the bedroom door?  It will at least make it easier to clean up!!


Quote:
> Thanks Roo!

> Shasta always uses his puppy pad, unless the bedroom door is closed, at
> which point he poops right in front of it, as if he's mad that we closed
him
> out.

> We left the door open this weekend and there was no problem, but he ate
> another blanket.

> I need him to use his pad if the bedroom door is shut, and get over the
fact
> that his daily diet doesn't include a piece of my bedding!

> Thanks,
> Carolyn  :-)





> > > Hi!  I've posted before, about my dog, Shasta, and you've always given
> me
> > > wonderful advice.  I need help again.

> > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
> trying
> > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
making
> a
> > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
cleaning
> > the
> > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > > Shasta goes outside with our older dog.  Star makes a noise so we know
> > when
> > > he has to go.  Shasta does nothing, so we take him out every two
hours.
> > If
> > > we aren't at home, he has to wear a muzzle, but has free run of the
> house,
> > > and uses his pad.

> > > The problem I'm having now is that we've had to close our bedroom off
to
> > the
> > > dogs.  We used to let them both go in and lay on the bed during the
day,
> > but
> > > Shasta started tearing the blankets and sheets, so we had to shut them
> > out.

> > > Now, every morning when I go upstairs to wake my youngest daughter for
> > > school, Shasta has pooped in the hallway in front of the closed door.
I
> > > have told him no and that he's a bad dog, and I know he understands
from
> > the
> > > way he slinks away when I speak to him.  If he's upstairs, he tries to
> get
> > > away before I notice.  He only does it in the morning, even if he's
> > already
> > > gone outside and pooped there.  If by some miracle he hasn't gone, I
> tell
> > > him what a good dog he is and give him a treat.

> > > My questions are:  how do I make him stop pooping in the hall without
> > > reopening my bedroom, and how do I teach him to let us know when he
has
> to
> > > go out, the way Star does?

> > > Shasta is really a kind & loving puppy, and when you look at how far
> he's
> > > come, I really don't mind the pad, or the upstairs pooping (it's easy
to
> > > clean).  However, my boyfriend feels that since his perfect dog Star
> never
> > > does anything wrong, mine can be trained to be perfect, too.  I think
> it's
> > > just the difference in age - Star is a chocolate lab that's 9, and
> Shasta
> > > hasn't even had his first birthday yet.  I would appreciate any and
all
> > > suggestions.

> > > Thanks,
> > > Carolyn

> > Hi Carolyn,

> > Most behaviorists argue that dogs don't know when they have 'done wrong'
> esp
> > if it was a while back, they just 'look guilty' as a reaction to the
sight
> > and sound of their owner being annoyed.

> > If Shasta is pooping regularly in the moring, try pre-empting him, and
> > taking him out beforehand. He is less likely to poop if empty. Take him
of
> a
> > fairly long walk, so he can poop more than once if he needs to. Or play
an
> > active game with him outside - activity tends to help dogs 'go' faster.
> Dogs
> > have their own timetable, and you could keep track of when he needs to
go
> > more often, and take him out more often, with praise when he performs.
> Dogs
> > may naturally be able to last 8 hrs for part of a 24-hr cycle, but at
> other
> > times of the day need to go much more often. Mine need to go at least
> every
> > two hours in the early evening, when their bowels seem especially
active.

> > He may already be trying to tell you when he needs to go, so see if he
> does
> > anything unusual, like trying to climb or your lap, before giving you a
> > little 'present'. It's not just you trying to teach him, but also trying
> to
> > understand what he is telling you.

> > Ian Dunbar has written an inexpensive guide to dog behavior (title is
just
> > 'Dog behavior', and a good book on training dogs ('How to teach a new
dog
> > old tricks') which it might be worthwhile your reading, esp if you can
get
> > hold of them from a library.

> > Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Caroly » Wed, 19 Dec 2001 21:21:33


Thanks Stu!  I was actually considering that...  I just don't want him to
have millions of places to go in the house.  If I put a pad down, maybe the
fun of it will be gone for him, or at least he might stop once he gets used
to the door being closed.

Carolyn  :-)


Quote:
> This isn't the best solution, but how about putting the pads down in front
> of the bedroom door?  It will at least make it easier to clean up!!



> > Thanks Roo!

> > Shasta always uses his puppy pad, unless the bedroom door is closed, at
> > which point he poops right in front of it, as if he's mad that we closed
> him
> > out.

> > We left the door open this weekend and there was no problem, but he ate
> > another blanket.

> > I need him to use his pad if the bedroom door is shut, and get over the
> fact
> > that his daily diet doesn't include a piece of my bedding!

> > Thanks,
> > Carolyn  :-)





> > > > Hi!  I've posted before, about my dog, Shasta, and you've always
given
> > me
> > > > wonderful advice.  I need help again.

> > > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
> > trying
> > > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
> making
> > a
> > > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
> cleaning
> > > the
> > > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > > > Shasta goes outside with our older dog.  Star makes a noise so we
know
> > > when
> > > > he has to go.  Shasta does nothing, so we take him out every two
> hours.
> > > If
> > > > we aren't at home, he has to wear a muzzle, but has free run of the
> > house,
> > > > and uses his pad.

> > > > The problem I'm having now is that we've had to close our bedroom
off
> to
> > > the
> > > > dogs.  We used to let them both go in and lay on the bed during the
> day,
> > > but
> > > > Shasta started tearing the blankets and sheets, so we had to shut
them
> > > out.

> > > > Now, every morning when I go upstairs to wake my youngest daughter
for
> > > > school, Shasta has pooped in the hallway in front of the closed
door.
> I
> > > > have told him no and that he's a bad dog, and I know he understands
> from
> > > the
> > > > way he slinks away when I speak to him.  If he's upstairs, he tries
to
> > get
> > > > away before I notice.  He only does it in the morning, even if he's
> > > already
> > > > gone outside and pooped there.  If by some miracle he hasn't gone, I
> > tell
> > > > him what a good dog he is and give him a treat.

> > > > My questions are:  how do I make him stop pooping in the hall
without
> > > > reopening my bedroom, and how do I teach him to let us know when he
> has
> > to
> > > > go out, the way Star does?

> > > > Shasta is really a kind & loving puppy, and when you look at how far
> > he's
> > > > come, I really don't mind the pad, or the upstairs pooping (it's
easy
> to
> > > > clean).  However, my boyfriend feels that since his perfect dog Star
> > never
> > > > does anything wrong, mine can be trained to be perfect, too.  I
think
> > it's
> > > > just the difference in age - Star is a chocolate lab that's 9, and
> > Shasta
> > > > hasn't even had his first birthday yet.  I would appreciate any and
> all
> > > > suggestions.

> > > > Thanks,
> > > > Carolyn

> > > Hi Carolyn,

> > > Most behaviorists argue that dogs don't know when they have 'done
wrong'
> > esp
> > > if it was a while back, they just 'look guilty' as a reaction to the
> sight
> > > and sound of their owner being annoyed.

> > > If Shasta is pooping regularly in the moring, try pre-empting him, and
> > > taking him out beforehand. He is less likely to poop if empty. Take
him
> of
> > a
> > > fairly long walk, so he can poop more than once if he needs to. Or
play
> an
> > > active game with him outside - activity tends to help dogs 'go'
faster.
> > Dogs
> > > have their own timetable, and you could keep track of when he needs to
> go
> > > more often, and take him out more often, with praise when he performs.
> > Dogs
> > > may naturally be able to last 8 hrs for part of a 24-hr cycle, but at
> > other
> > > times of the day need to go much more often. Mine need to go at least
> > every
> > > two hours in the early evening, when their bowels seem especially
> active.

> > > He may already be trying to tell you when he needs to go, so see if he
> > does
> > > anything unusual, like trying to climb or your lap, before giving you
a
> > > little 'present'. It's not just you trying to teach him, but also
trying
> > to
> > > understand what he is telling you.

> > > Ian Dunbar has written an inexpensive guide to dog behavior (title is
> just
> > > 'Dog behavior', and a good book on training dogs ('How to teach a new
> dog
> > > old tricks') which it might be worthwhile your reading, esp if you can
> get
> > > hold of them from a library.

> > > Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Diana Attwoo » Thu, 20 Dec 2001 17:56:14


Quote:

> Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.

Did anybody see my Google post?.....How on earth did this happen!!!
 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by roo » Sat, 22 Dec 2001 00:47:27




Quote:

> > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
trying
> > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making
a
> > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning
the
> > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden Retriever????
> (Still Googling) :(

I did wonder if there was a mistake.

Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked ragged
by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude comments
about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's this I
have on the end of my..?')

The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a lady
and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to severe
injuries.

Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Lushious Lug » Sat, 22 Dec 2001 02:56:02


Quote:

> The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
lady
> and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to severe
> injuries.

> Alikat

..can you imagine little Casanova chi trotting down the road dragging a
step-ladder and bunch of flowers behind him??
 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by robinandlyn » Sat, 22 Dec 2001 04:18:52


ok.... here's one for the record books, girls.... In my town we had to
find homes for twelve (TWELVE!) Newfoundland/Cocker Spaniel crosses.
(Think Newfies with really short legs.)  All very nice dogs, it turnes
out, but really very funny looking, indeed.  The story i was told was
that the family kept the Newfie *** and male***er in the back yard
together thinking that a union would be impossible.  These were both
very expensive animals.  The level of co-operation does not bear
thinking about, but they were great doggie pals and a real team as it
turns out.

Why were the animals not fixed?  The man of the household couldn't
stand to think of it.  He "loved" the dogs too much.  Whatever.  I
live the Pacific Northwest and often run into examples of what we like
to call, "More money than sense".
Jolly regards, Lynne

Quote:



> > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
>  trying
> > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy making
>  a
> > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed cleaning
>  the
> > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden Retriever????
> > (Still Googling) :(

> I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked ragged
> by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude comments
> about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's this I
> have on the end of my..?')

> The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a lady
> and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to severe
> injuries.

> Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Kay » Sat, 22 Dec 2001 07:36:19


I know a JR who was ***d by a golden labrador.  She only had one
puppy, which was huge, but she was fine. :o)


Quote:



> > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
> trying
> > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
making
> a
> > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
cleaning
> the
> > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden Retriever????
> > (Still Googling) :(

> I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked ragged
> by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude comments
> about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's this I
> have on the end of my..?')

> The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
lady
> and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to severe
> injuries.

> Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by ClippoPuppe » Sat, 22 Dec 2001 09:31:15


The puppy I was going to adopt from a shelter before I decided on PT was a
dachshund/German Shepherd mix.  Think tiny, elongated German Shepherd.  He
was darling, but unfortunately he had contracted Parvo and didn't survive.

--
Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain and most fools do.

-Benjamin Franklin

Quote:



> > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
> trying
> > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
making
> a
> > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
cleaning
> the
> > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden Retriever????
> > (Still Googling) :(

> I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked ragged
> by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude comments
> about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's this I
> have on the end of my..?')

> The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
lady
> and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to severe
> injuries.

> Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Jean L. Atkinso » Sun, 23 Dec 2001 05:52:03


This cross had to have been done on purpose. There is no way either one
would work on their own. As was said, the size difference alone says it all.
I know of other crosses that were done by A.I. You can cross anything you
want this way.

Quote:
> I know a JR who was ***d by a golden labrador.  She only had one
> puppy, which was huge, but she was fine. :o)





> > > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started out
> > trying
> > > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
> making
> > a
> > > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
> cleaning
> > the
> > > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden
Retriever????
> > > (Still Googling) :(

> > I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> > Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked
ragged
> > by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude
comments
> > about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's this
I
> > have on the end of my..?')

> > The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
> lady
> > and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to
severe
> > injuries.

> > Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Caroly » Sun, 23 Dec 2001 08:27:56


Sorry - it wasn't done on purpose...

The neighbors left their dog tied out all day long.  They didn't know who
the father was until the puppies came out - just a stray passing by.  It is
really sad that they take care of their dogs this way.  It's not the first
time this has happened.  They got rid of the mother when the puppies were 6
weeks old.  They go thru dogs faster than most of us go thru panties.  When
I saw the puppies, I couldn't help but feel sorry for them, so I saved the
smallest one.  There were nine - no mother mom was so miserable!  I'm
surprised she didn't die...

Carolyn - Shasta's mom


Quote:
> This cross had to have been done on purpose. There is no way either one
> would work on their own. As was said, the size difference alone says it
all.
> I know of other crosses that were done by A.I. You can cross anything you
> want this way.


> > I know a JR who was ***d by a golden labrador.  She only had one
> > puppy, which was huge, but she was fine. :o)





> > > > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started
out
> > > trying
> > > > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
> > making
> > > a
> > > > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
> > cleaning
> > > the
> > > > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > > > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden
> Retriever????
> > > > (Still Googling) :(

> > > I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> > > Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked
> ragged
> > > by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude
> comments
> > > about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's
this
> I
> > > have on the end of my..?')

> > > The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
> > lady
> > > and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to
> severe
> > > injuries.

> > > Alikat

 
 
 

Potty training problem

Post by Kay » Sun, 23 Dec 2001 19:59:20


Nope, just a very randy labrador escapee.  The owner of the JR took her to
the vet who assured him she wasn't pregnant!!!!!!  However, she was and her
pregnancy was very difficult as the puppy was so big, but she had it
naturally and as I said was fine.  Most peculiar looking puppy mind.



Quote:
> This cross had to have been done on purpose. There is no way either one
> would work on their own. As was said, the size difference alone says it
all.
> I know of other crosses that were done by A.I. You can cross anything you
> want this way.


> > I know a JR who was ***d by a golden labrador.  She only had one
> > puppy, which was huge, but she was fine. :o)





> > > > > Shasta is part Chihuahua and part Golden Retriever.  We started
out
> > > trying
> > > > > to crate train him, but it just didn't work.  He seemed to enjoy
> > making
> > > a
> > > > > mess in the crate and playing in it, a lot more than I enjoyed
> > cleaning
> > > the
> > > > > crate, him, and the floor.  We finally settled on puppy pads.

> > > > The bit I don't get is how a chihuahua cross with a Golden
> Retriever????
> > > > (Still Googling) :(

> > > I did wonder if there was a mistake.

> > > Tilly and Conor's mum was a third the size of their dad, and looked
> ragged
> > > by the time the pups were five weeks' old. People made very rude
> comments
> > > about the mating (eg Sebbie, the father, must have thought  'What's
this
> I
> > > have on the end of my..?')

> > > The size difference is so big here tho' that maybe the retriever was a
> > lady
> > > and didn't notice, since the other way round would probably lead to
> severe
> > > injuries.

> > > Alikat