Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

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Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by dolore » Mon, 04 Jan 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

> x-no-archive:yes


> > When my 17 year old, 16 lb. pup was put to sleep for kidney disease, I
> > asked if I could hold her. The vet tech shrieked "no" and the vet
> > agreed.

> > Since that time, I have read time and time again of people holding their
> > pets when they were put to sleep. I stopped going to that vet place
> > because I was not happy with the service but am still wondering if there
> > are legitimate reasons some professionals have for not wanting people to
> > hold their pets when they ae euthanized.

> > Any feedback would be welcome. I feel so guilty now thinking I should
> > have known better and stood up for my rights. P.S In addition, the vet
> > did not give a relaxer first, then the 2nd needle. He just gave her one
> > which made her yelp, then she was gone. It was very painful to watch. Is
> > this normal? No relaxer? Why would the pup yelp?

> > Thank you in advance,

> > Lee

> > P.S. If you care to respond, please email me directly if at all
> > possible. Thank you.

> When they told you "No" you should have grabbed your dog and walked out
> immediately, and found a new vet.

> (ken)

That's easy to say to someone else, Ken, particularly after the fact.  My
sympathies, Lee.  I sure wish it hadn't turned out that way but I hope that
you can find a way to stop feeling guilty, because you didn't know at the
time what your rights were.

Dolores

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Dr Kyl » Tue, 05 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> > x-no-archive:yes


> > > When my 17 year old, 16 lb. pup was put to sleep for kidney disease, I
> > > asked if I could hold her. The vet tech shrieked "no" and the vet
> > > agreed.

> > > Since that time, I have read time and time again of people holding their
> > > pets when they were put to sleep. I stopped going to that vet place
> > > because I was not happy with the service but am still wondering if there
> > > are legitimate reasons some professionals have for not wanting people to
> > > hold their pets when they ae euthanized.

You do not have the *right* to restrain your own animal when a vet is
giving an injection, especially one as critical as euthanasia
solution.  
Of the times I have been talked into letting an owner hold for a
procedure, 7 times out of 10 they let go at exactly the wrong time, or
hold in such a way as to impede the procedure.

Also, the literature is full of stories where the dog moves, and the
owner ends up injected.  It would have been a very bad idea to have you
hold the dog.

I am also one of the vets who encourages owners to be present during
euthanasia.  I'd have requested that you stand where the dog could see
you and hold a paw and comfort your dog as it left this world.  As soon
as the injection was done, we would have let you hold the dog in it's
final seconds.

I'm sorry that a difficult time was made harder for you by an
insensitive tech.

Now, did you want this to be posted to alt.med.veterinary?  Or is (ken)
up to his regular routine of trying to crosspost anything he can use to
allow a platform for vet bashing?

Kyla, DVM

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Elizabeth B. Nai » Tue, 05 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> You do not have the *right* to restrain your own animal when a vet is
> giving an injection, especially one as critical as euthanasia
> solution.  

Well, actually, one does;  it's excercised the same way any "right" (and
I use the term loosely) in the patient-vet-client relationship is.  If
it's important to you and your regular vet won't allow it, you go to one
who does.

Quote:
> Of the times I have been talked into letting an owner hold for a
> procedure, 7 times out of 10 they let go at exactly the wrong time, or
> hold in such a way as to impede the procedure.

I find this very interesting and frankly peculiar.  I have never had any
trouble holding a pet during any procedure.  I know how to gently, firmly
and safely restrain them because my vet taught me a long time ago, when I
first expressed interest in doing so for routine procedures like tests
and vaccinations.  Unless the vet only sees the animal at the time of
euthanasia, there should be plenty of time in the normal course of the
relationship to teach the interested owner how to hold the animal, and to
determine if this particular owner is or is not capable of doing so.

One of these days my vet is going to retire or something, and at that
time I will have to talk to other area vets about their policies on
this.  Willingness to allow me to hold the animals will be one of the
"must have" factors in deciding whom to use as a regular vet.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Elizabeth B. Naime            *   Email may be forwarded and/or posted

CUR 70 / FUR 212              *       * Standard Disclaimers Apply*
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Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by rab.. » Tue, 05 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>  It is sometimes difficult for an experienced person to restrain an animal,
> and many owners are unwilling to hold the pet tightly enough to be able to
> prevent escape or biting. Liz

Is it not possible to do the deed in such a way that the animal does not
try to escape or bite? I'm thinking about a dog who is ordinarily fine
about injections, so that he does not yelp or bite or try to get away when
he feels the needle go in.
 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Ton » Tue, 05 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Is it not possible to do the deed in such a way
>that the animal does not try to escape or bite?
>I'm thinking about a dog who is ordinarily fine
>about injections, so that he does not yelp or
>bite or try to get away when he feels the
>needle go in.

There is an incredible amount of tension in the air at such times--
tension that a dog easily senses. It is difficult all the way around--
the owners are struggling desperately not to sob, and often the vet is a
bit misty. Everyone basically just wishes it was over. A bit of struggle
from an intuitive dog would not be surprising.  

Toni
www.irish-wolfhounds.com

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by thaddeu » Tue, 05 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


> > x-no-archive:yes


> > > When my 17 year old, 16 lb. pup was put to sleep for kidney disease, I
> > > asked if I could hold her. The vet tech shrieked "no" and the vet
> > > agreed.

> When we put our 14 yo down, I got some sedative tablets from the vet in the
> morning so he was pretty sleepy in the afternoon.  The vet came to the house
> and gave him the injection while I held his head on my lap, he died in my
> arms.I wouldn't consider any other way.

Now this sounds like the best idea yet.  I hope I don't have to worry about it
for many years, but our pets range in age from 2 years to 14, so the time will
certainly come for some of them.  Thank you for sharing this.

Dolores

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by hillary gorm » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00




*
*> You do not have the *right* to restrain your own animal when a vet is
*> giving an injection, especially one as critical as euthanasia
*> solution.  
*
*Well, actually, one does;  it's excercised the same way any "right" (and
*I use the term loosely) in the patient-vet-client relationship is.  If
*it's important to you and your regular vet won't allow it, you go to one
*who does.

Hmmm. Can you give me the name of a company offering malpractice insurance
to veterinarians who allow pet-owners to restrain their own pets for
procedures and which does not charge exorbitant rates?

 --

 "So that's 2 T-1s and a newsfeed....would you like clues with that?"

 Net Access...The NSP for ISPs....The NOC that rocks around the clock.

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Layna Ayre Anderse » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



>>  It is sometimes difficult for an experienced person to restrain an
animal,
>> and many owners are unwilling to hold the pet tightly enough to be able
to
>> prevent escape or biting. Liz

>Is it not possible to do the deed in such a way that the animal does not
>try to escape or bite? I'm thinking about a dog who is ordinarily fine
>about injections, so that he does not yelp or bite or try to get away when
>he feels the needle go in.

A young friend of mine was sent by his parents to have the family cat put to
sleep (it had cancer and was past treating). He was present when the vet
gave the cat the shot; unfortunately, the cat had a strange reaction to the
injection, and convulsed and shrieked horribly before dying. This was
incredibly traumatic for this ***age friend of mine. It could make me
hesitate about being present for a cat of mine's euthanasia.

Layna (who hopes her cats have plenty of time before that's a worry anyway)

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Erica Hancoc » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Actually, I think she was reffering to holding the dog after it left this
world. I'm not trying to speak for anyone else, but if that was the case, I
really think the vet was in the wrong this time. Restraining.... I can
understand the vet's view. But holding your dog after he or she has left the
world is like saying good bye for the last time.

Erica

Quote:



>> > x-no-archive:yes


>> > > When my 17 year old, 16 lb. pup was put to sleep for kidney disease,
I
>> > > asked if I could hold her. The vet tech shrieked "no" and the vet
>> > > agreed.

>> > > Since that time, I have read time and time again of people holding
their
>> > > pets when they were put to sleep. I stopped going to that vet place
>> > > because I was not happy with the service but am still wondering if
there
>> > > are legitimate reasons some professionals have for not wanting people
to
>> > > hold their pets when they ae euthanized.

>You do not have the *right* to restrain your own animal when a vet is
>giving an injection, especially one as critical as euthanasia
>solution.
>Of the times I have been talked into letting an owner hold for a
>procedure, 7 times out of 10 they let go at exactly the wrong time, or
>hold in such a way as to impede the procedure.

>Also, the literature is full of stories where the dog moves, and the
>owner ends up injected.  It would have been a very bad idea to have you
>hold the dog.

>I am also one of the vets who encourages owners to be present during
>euthanasia.  I'd have requested that you stand where the dog could see
>you and hold a paw and comfort your dog as it left this world.  As soon
>as the injection was done, we would have let you hold the dog in it's
>final seconds.

>I'm sorry that a difficult time was made harder for you by an
>insensitive tech.

>Now, did you want this to be posted to alt.med.veterinary?  Or is (ken)
>up to his regular routine of trying to crosspost anything he can use to
>allow a platform for vet bashing?

>Kyla, DVM

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Erica Hancoc » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Actually, I think she was reffering to holding the dog after it left this
world. I'm not trying to speak for anyone else, but if that was the case, I
really think the vet was in the wrong this time. Restraining.... I can
understand the vet's view. But holding your dog after he or she has left the
world is like saying good bye for the last time.

Erica

Quote:



>> > x-no-archive:yes


>> > > When my 17 year old, 16 lb. pup was put to sleep for kidney disease,
I
>> > > asked if I could hold her. The vet tech shrieked "no" and the vet
>> > > agreed.

>> > > Since that time, I have read time and time again of people holding
their
>> > > pets when they were put to sleep. I stopped going to that vet place
>> > > because I was not happy with the service but am still wondering if
there
>> > > are legitimate reasons some professionals have for not wanting people
to
>> > > hold their pets when they ae euthanized.

>You do not have the *right* to restrain your own animal when a vet is
>giving an injection, especially one as critical as euthanasia
>solution.
>Of the times I have been talked into letting an owner hold for a
>procedure, 7 times out of 10 they let go at exactly the wrong time, or
>hold in such a way as to impede the procedure.

>Also, the literature is full of stories where the dog moves, and the
>owner ends up injected.  It would have been a very bad idea to have you
>hold the dog.

>I am also one of the vets who encourages owners to be present during
>euthanasia.  I'd have requested that you stand where the dog could see
>you and hold a paw and comfort your dog as it left this world.  As soon
>as the injection was done, we would have let you hold the dog in it's
>final seconds.

>I'm sorry that a difficult time was made harder for you by an
>insensitive tech.

>Now, did you want this to be posted to alt.med.veterinary?  Or is (ken)
>up to his regular routine of trying to crosspost anything he can use to
>allow a platform for vet bashing?

>Kyla, DVM

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Elizabeth B. Nai » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hmmm. Can you give me the name of a company offering malpractice insurance
> to veterinarians who allow pet-owners to restrain their own pets for
> procedures and which does not charge exorbitant rates?

No;  I'm not on that end of the business.  Had the ambition to learn to
be a vet when I was little, then at 10 or 12 I realized that even the
best veterinarians can't save all their patients... and I don't think I'd
be able to deal with that.

However, as a pet owner, I can direct people who are local to me to
several vets who do allow the client to hold and/or restrain their own
pets.  And I would be interested to learn of ANY horse vet who does not
allow the owner to assist in routine procedures (and a number of
nonroutine ones as well).  Heck, vets who don't automatically expect you
to do most of the handling are few and far between in my admittedly
limited experience.  I don't mind "holding my horses" but it has never
even come up that I might be expected NOT to -- it's always "ok, bring
here around here to the x-ray, good, now keep her still while we take the
picture..." and postcards saying, come by the office to pick up their
annual shots.  Considering the size of your average horse or even of my
own horses, who are comparatively small (14h2 and 15h respectively, in
the neighborhood of a half-ton each), I'd think the "liability" issues
would be... interesting.

Are we still on alt.med.veterinary?  If so, I'd actually be interested in
learning more about veterinary malpractice insurance.  Do the policies
actually specifically talk about who restrains the animal, and so forth?  
And how much more does malpractice insurance cost for a large animal
practice, considering that the standard practices in that field are
apparently considered insanely risky when done with smaller animals?

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Elizabeth B. Naime            *   Email may be forwarded and/or posted

CUR 70 / FUR 212              *       * Standard Disclaimers Apply*
------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by Elizabeth B. Nai » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hmmm. Can you give me the name of a company offering malpractice insurance
> to veterinarians who allow pet-owners to restrain their own pets for
> procedures and which does not charge exorbitant rates?

No;  I'm not on that end of the business.  Had the ambition to learn to
be a vet when I was little, then at 10 or 12 I realized that even the
best veterinarians can't save all their patients... and I don't think I'd
be able to deal with that.

However, as a pet owner, I can direct people who are local to me to
several vets who do allow the client to hold and/or restrain their own
pets.  And I would be interested to learn of ANY horse vet who does not
allow the owner to assist in routine procedures (and a number of
nonroutine ones as well).  Heck, vets who don't automatically expect you
to do most of the handling are few and far between in my admittedly
limited experience.  I don't mind "holding my horses" but it has never
even come up that I might be expected NOT to -- it's always "ok, bring
here around here to the x-ray, good, now keep her still while we take the
picture..." and postcards saying, come by the office to pick up their
annual shots.  Considering the size of your average horse or even of my
own horses, who are comparatively small (14h2 and 15h respectively, in
the neighborhood of a half-ton each), I'd think the "liability" issues
would be... interesting.

Are we still on alt.med.veterinary?  If so, I'd actually be interested in
learning more about veterinary malpractice insurance.  Do the policies
actually specifically talk about who restrains the animal, and so forth?  
And how much more does malpractice insurance cost for a large animal
practice, considering that the standard practices in that field are
apparently considered insanely risky when done with smaller animals?

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Elizabeth B. Naime            *   Email may be forwarded and/or posted

CUR 70 / FUR 212              *       * Standard Disclaimers Apply*
------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Vet tech and vet said I couldn't hold my baby when she waseuthanized

Post by MWOODRO » Wed, 06 Jan 1999 04:00:00


I have had to put 3 cats and one dog to sleep.  In 3 cases the animal was given
a tranquillizer shot first.  In 3 cases this was done at my home.  I was able
to hold all of my animals.  My vet never mentioned anything about possible
seizures (the tranquillizers would have made them unnoticeable posssibly?).
The only thing he told me was the possibility of my pets voiding their
bladders.  In every single case my pets's deaths were peaceful.  At no time was
I in the vets way.  There is a big difference in holding off a vein for a vet
and being allowed to hold your animal when its time to put them to sleep.

I would advise anyone to insist they be allowed to be with their animal at this
time, if you can handle it.  There are many people who cannot and must say
good-bye in their own way (and there is nothing wrong with that).  Feeling
guilty after the fact is being too *** yourself.  Remember it is a very
traumatic time for you!  belive me I know.