Help: New black lab puppy

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Help: New black lab puppy

Post by Tracey Sowte » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Hi

I'm new to this group and would like some help please.

Two weeks ago we purchased a black lab puppy (now 10 weeks old) who is
really great.

The only problem is that she keeps play biting - she doesn't do it to my
husband and I any more but she is still doing it to our children (3 and 1/2
year old son and 1 year old daughter).

We've got her booked in for training classes in a few weeks but could do
with trying to prevent this now.

An obvious solution to this is to keep the children and the puppy apart but
we really want her to be part of our family life.

We know this is typical behaviour and will probably go away when she is
older but what do we do in the interim?

Please reply with any suggestions.

Thanks

Tracey

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by Ton » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00


 Dr. P's Dog Training Library: Puppies
http://www.uwsp.edu/acad/psych/dog/lib-puppy.htm
has lots of articles regarding mouthy puppies.

Toni
www.irish-wolfhounds.com

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by Calvin Todd MacGillivra » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00


As soon as she starts playbiting, put a favourite chew toy of her in her
mouth and praise her. If she trys to return to your hand scold her in a
stern vocal tone of voice. Follow this again by placing the chew toy in her
mouth and praise. Helps a lot if she really likes the toy and you might want
to set that toy aside for only situations like this. Thus she will have it
to look forward to and won't be bored of it when you try to use it.

My 6 year old Lab loves nothing more than squirming on his back getting
belly rubs while chomping on an old bone. Reminds me I need to videotape it
because it is too hilarious.


Quote:
> Hi

> I'm new to this group and would like some help please.

> Two weeks ago we purchased a black lab puppy (now 10 weeks old) who is
> really great.

> The only problem is that she keeps play biting - she doesn't do it to my
> husband and I any more but she is still doing it to our children (3 and
1/2
> year old son and 1 year old daughter).

> We've got her booked in for training classes in a few weeks but could do
> with trying to prevent this now.

> An obvious solution to this is to keep the children and the puppy apart
but
> we really want her to be part of our family life.

> We know this is typical behaviour and will probably go away when she is
> older but what do we do in the interim?

> Please reply with any suggestions.

> Thanks

> Tracey

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by WENDY J SAUNDER » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00


You can try saying "ouch" in a high tone, and standing up, or putting her
down, whichever removes her from you.  She gets three chances.  3d "ouch"
earns a time out in her crate.  I second the motion never to leave her
unattended with your kids, for HER sake.  Be patient, your children used to
bite, too!  Wendy
Quote:

>Hi

>I'm new to this group and would like some help please.

>Two weeks ago we purchased a black lab puppy (now 10 weeks old) who is
>really great.

>The only problem is that she keeps play biting - she doesn't do it to my
>husband and I any more but she is still doing it to our children (3 and 1/2
>year old son and 1 year old daughter).

>We've got her booked in for training classes in a few weeks but could do
>with trying to prevent this now.

>An obvious solution to this is to keep the children and the puppy apart but
>we really want her to be part of our family life.

>We know this is typical behaviour and will probably go away when she is
>older but what do we do in the interim?

>Please reply with any suggestions.

>Thanks

>Tracey

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by Pam, Melissa and Alliso » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Hello, I would recommend doing the "ouch" thing in a high pitched voice, but
I wouldnt recommend using her crate (if you plan on crate training her) as
punishment. Dog remember things like that and then associate punishments
with what is around them at the time.....so if you do use it as a punishment
she will remember for the rest of her life and you will struggle to get her
in and keep her quiet while in the crate. If it is your childrens hands that
she is biting at you can have them put lemon juice or vinigar on their hands
and puppies will learn by association quickly that hands dont taste good!!
And if it is clothing you can put vinigar and water in a spray bottle and
spray it in her mouth everytime she pulls on the clothes.....I hope this
helps.....and good luck with the classes they will be very rewarding!!
Melissa
Quote:
>You can try saying "ouch" in a high tone, and standing up, or putting her
>down, whichever removes her from you.  She gets three chances.  3d "ouch"
>earns a time out in her crate.  I second the motion never to leave her
>unattended with your kids, for HER sake.  Be patient, your children used to
>bite, too!  Wendy

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by Tony Gambrin » Sun, 11 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi

> I'm new to this group and would like some help please.

> Two weeks ago we purchased a black lab puppy (now 10 weeks old) who is
> really great.

> The only problem is that she keeps play biting - she doesn't do it to my
> husband and I any more but she is still doing it to our children (3 and 1/2
> year old son and 1 year old daughter).

> We've got her booked in for training classes in a few weeks but could do
> with trying to prevent this now.

> An obvious solution to this is to keep the children and the puppy apart but
> we really want her to be part of our family life.

> We know this is typical behaviour and will probably go away when she is
> older but what do we do in the interim?

> Please reply with any suggestions.

> Thanks

> Tracey

Give her chew toys. Tell her "no" when she bites hard. Tell the pup it
hurts when she bites. She should stop. If she keeps it up put her lip
under her teeth when she bites. When pups teethe they bite a lot. Give
her soup bones from the grocery store.

Tony

 
 
 

Help: New black lab puppy

Post by WENDY J SAUNDER » Tue, 13 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Sorry, I wasn't specific.  In an effort to be quick I left out the rather
important instruction that when putting the pup in its crate for a time out,
*you do NOT* make it a punishment by saying "bad dog" or worse, spanking &
throwing in crate.  Simply pick the pup up saying nothing more than the ouch
and "Sorry" in the same tone used in clicker training (information purposes
only to dog) and placing in crate.  Dog can have chewies and toys in crate.
This is a time out *NOT* jail.  This usage is part of crate training.  After
10-15 minutes pup can come out for another try.  You're right in saying that
they remember...they remember that when they bit their human, the object of
their attention was taken away.  I use this on needle teeth JR puppies and I
promise you every one loves to "kennel up" because that's where dinner and
biscuits magically appear.  Better?  Wendy PS   Liked the vinegar tip!


Quote:
>Hello, I would recommend doing the "ouch" thing in a high pitched voice,
but
>I wouldnt recommend using her crate (if you plan on crate training her) as
>punishment. Dog remember things like that and then associate punishments
>with what is around them at the time.....so if you do use it as a
punishment
>she will remember for the rest of her life and you will struggle to get her
>in and keep her quiet while in the crate. If it is your childrens hands
that
>she is biting at you can have them put lemon juice or vinigar on their
hands
>and puppies will learn by association quickly that hands dont taste good!!
>And if it is clothing you can put vinigar and water in a spray bottle and
>spray it in her mouth everytime she pulls on the clothes.....I hope this
>helps.....and good luck with the classes they will be very rewarding!!
>Melissa

>>You can try saying "ouch" in a high tone, and standing up, or putting her
>>down, whichever removes her from you.  She gets three chances.  3d "ouch"
>>earns a time out in her crate.  I second the motion never to leave her
>>unattended with your kids, for HER sake.  Be patient, your children used
to
>>bite, too!  Wendy