Mals vs. Sibs

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Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Christian Walte » Sun, 04 Apr 1993 06:34:04



Hi!

I've been drooling over the chance to get a Siberian Husky for years
now, and now it looks like that will be just a few months away.  But,
after reading the FAQ lists for both the Sibs and the Alaskan
Malamutes, I'm having a hard time distinguishing between which dog
I'd prefer.

The main difference I can see is size.  Mals are larger and stronger,
Sibs are a bit smaller and quicker.  Also, there were more diseases
listed in the Mal FAQ, but that may just mean it was more complete than
the Husky FAQ.

Everything else, from what I can tell, is nearly identical.  Temperment,
intelligence, ease of training, and so forth.

Is there someone out there who has been around both that can tell me
any subtle differences between the two?  I'm sure I'd be happy with
either, but I just want to know which to delve into :)

Sorry if this has been discussed before, but I just started reading
this list recently.

Thanks for any help, gang!

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Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Mike Jon » Mon, 05 Apr 1993 03:42:39


Quote:

>I've been drooling over the chance to get a Siberian Husky for years
>now, and now it looks like that will be just a few months away.  But,
>after reading the FAQ lists for both the Sibs and the Alaskan
>Malamutes, I'm having a hard time distinguishing between which dog
>I'd prefer.
>The main difference I can see is size.  Mals are larger and stronger,
>Sibs are a bit smaller and quicker.  Also, there were more diseases
>listed in the Mal FAQ, but that may just mean it was more complete than
>the Husky FAQ.

Actually, Sibs are a good bit smaller. Typical Sib is 40-50 lbs, and 110-120
lb Mals aren't unusual.

Quote:
>Everything else, from what I can tell, is nearly identical.  Temperment,
>intelligence, ease of training, and so forth.

The personality is different. Mals, I believe, are a bit more people
oriented by nature. They are also a bit calmer in general. As a minor
difference, only Sibs have blue eyes. They can be brown, blue or bi-eyed
(one blue, one brown). Mals have brown eyes.

You might also want to look into Samoyeds. They're related to Mals and Sibs
as a breed and are midway between the two in most characteristics (including
size). They seem to be somewhat more people oriented than either Mals or
Sibs. Unfortunately, there's no Samoyed FAQ.


A Real Programmer's idea of a personal computer is a 3090 with the operating
system "tweaked" to his personal specifications.

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Stephen R L » Mon, 05 Apr 1993 15:36:32


Quote:

>Hi!

>I've been drooling over the chance to get a Siberian Husky for years
>now, and now it looks like that will be just a few months away.  But,
>after reading the FAQ lists for both the Sibs and the Alaskan
>Malamutes, I'm having a hard time distinguishing between which dog
>I'd prefer.

>The main difference I can see is size.  Mals are larger and stronger,
>Sibs are a bit smaller and quicker.  Also, there were more diseases
>listed in the Mal FAQ, but that may just mean it was more complete than
>the Husky FAQ.

These are obvious differences, but remember that since Mals are larger,
things that apply to both dogs tend to "amplified" with Mals.  For example,
distructive behavior for bored Mals can be much worse than with bored Sibs.

I use this as an example to highlight the point made in the FAQ's for these
breeds, that these are working breeds and need something to do.  You do not
have to mush, but you do need to occupy their minds.  Obedience, agility,
hiking, and so on.

Remember that neither of these breeds are "easy breeds."  They can be
quite a challenge.  Their cleverness, tenacity, and desire to work
can be a problem for the average pet owner.

Quote:
>Everything else, from what I can tell, is nearly identical.  Temperment,
>intelligence, ease of training, and so forth.

>Is there someone out there who has been around both that can tell me
>any subtle differences between the two?  I'm sure I'd be happy with
>either, but I just want to know which to delve into :)

I have both.  One Mal and three Sibs.  

Alaskan Malamutes tend to be more "cuddly" than Siberian Huskies (on the average).
Alaskan Malamutes are essentially big teddy bears, whereas Sibs canbe a bit more
aloof.  Depending on what you are looking for, this can be attractive to you
or somewhat unappealing.  

You should ask yourself, what you would like to do with the dog?

Please e-mail me and I can advise you in more detail.

[stuff deleted]

Quote:
>----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>|                                    |                                 |
>| Christian Walters                  |                                 |
>| Electronics Technical Documentation        |  "What is it about the     |
>| Intergraph Corporation             |   Gates of Hell that makes      |
>| Phone:    (205) 730-8522           |   people want to go into        |
>| FAX:              (205) 730-8344           |   them all the time?"      |

>| UUCP:        !uunet!ingr!b23b!dcw!dcwalter |           -Crow, MST3K          |
>|                                    |                                 |
>----------------------------------------------------------------------------

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============================================================
Stephen R. Lee                 |
OooWoo Racing Kennel           | I'd rather be driving sled

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Dan Sugals » Tue, 06 Apr 1993 17:38:15


: You might also want to look into Samoyeds. They're related to Mals and Sibs
: as a breed and are midway between the two in most characteristics (including
: size). They seem to be somewhat more people oriented than either Mals or
: Sibs. Unfortunately, there's no Samoyed FAQ.

That people oriented may come in part from the Samoyeds use a a herding dog.
Herding breeds tend to be very people oriented.  Yes there are even
Samoyeds herding today.  If I get one in the future (it's a good
compromise breed for Dan and I) I know the breeders I'll go with.  They
check health, show in breed and obedience, temperament test and herding
instinct test.  I like that.

Karen

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Stephen R L » Fri, 09 Apr 1993 01:05:01


Quote:


>: You might also want to look into Samoyeds. They're related to Mals and Sibs
>: as a breed and are midway between the two in most characteristics (including
>: size). They seem to be somewhat more people oriented than either Mals or
>: Sibs. Unfortunately, there's no Samoyed FAQ.

>That people oriented may come in part from the Samoyeds use a a herding dog.
>Herding breeds tend to be very people oriented.  Yes there are even
>Samoyeds herding today.  If I get one in the future (it's a good
>compromise breed for Dan and I) I know the breeders I'll go with.  They
>check health, show in breed and obedience, temperament test and herding
>instinct test.  I like that.

>Karen

Actually, Sibs were used to herd reindeer.  Hard to imagine! :-)

--
============================================================
Stephen R. Lee                 |
OooWoo Racing Kennel           | I'd rather be driving sled

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Tom Harwo » Fri, 09 Apr 1993 03:29:12


Quote:


>: You might also want to look into Samoyeds. They're related to Mals and Sibs
>: as a breed and are midway between the two in most characteristics (including
>: size). They seem to be somewhat more people oriented than either Mals or
>: Sibs. Unfortunately, there's no Samoyed FAQ.
>That people oriented may come in part from the Samoyeds use a a herding dog.
>Herding breeds tend to be very people oriented.  Yes there are even
>Samoyeds herding today.  If I get one in the future (it's a good
>compromise breed for Dan and I) I know the breeders I'll go with.  They
>check health, show in breed and obedience, temperament test and herding
>instinct test.  I like that.

Sams were used for whatever was up, that seems to have meant hunting
at least as frequently as herding.  There is an anecdote in one of the
classic books on the breed (White, _The Samoyed_?  I can't remember,
but I can get the reference if anyone's interested) in which some Laplanders
identify Samoyeds as hunting dogs.  The dogs I've known have had fairly
strong prey drives.

I've never seen a really good history of the breed in Siberia, so I am
speculating a bit, but the Samoyed people prized their dogs highly,
worked very closely with them, and practiced selective breeding.
Not surprising that they wound up people-oriented.

- Tom
--

There's white hair all over this office -- springtime at last :-)

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Doug Johns » Sun, 11 Apr 1993 16:22:45


Our Siberian Husky, Nikita, may be the exception, but:


Quote:

> These are obvious differences, but remember that since Mals are larger,
> things that apply to both dogs tend to "amplified" with Mals.  For example,
> distructive behavior for bored Mals can be much worse than with bored Sibs.

> I use this as an example to highlight the point made in the FAQ's for these
> breeds, that these are working breeds and need something to do.  You do not
> have to mush, but you do need to occupy their minds.  Obedience, agility,
> hiking, and so on.

As an ***, Nikita is pretty sedentary. In her first five years,
I used to walk her 1/2 hour in the morning and 1/2 hour+ after
school, whether she needed it or not. Now that I have a job it is
not a daily occurance, to say the least. Yet Nikita just sleeps
away the day and is not too demanding in the evening (a bit of
play, either outside or with a toy indoors).

Quote:

> Remember that neither of these breeds are "easy breeds."  They can be
> quite a challenge.  Their cleverness, tenacity, and desire to work
> can be a problem for the average pet owner.

It is my feeling that the first or second 'incidents' are the
most important. One must have the time and be alert when one
first gets a Siberian. Make sure you correct their behaviour
right away or else its a lost cause.

Quote:
> Alaskan Malamutes tend to be more "cuddly" than Siberian Huskies (on the average).
> Alaskan Malamutes are essentially big teddy bears, whereas Sibs canbe a bit more
> aloof.  Depending on what you are looking for, this can be attractive to you
> or somewhat unappealing.  

And I thought Nikita was a suck! She is the most affectionette
dog I've known! We've been thinking about a second dog... and a
Malamute has crossed our minds. Maybe its time!

------------------------------------------------------------
Doug Johnson                    "Until the lions have their
Smithers, British Columbia       historians, tales of hunting
CANADA                           will always glorify the hunter"
                                      -African saying

 
 
 

Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Sky Warri » Tue, 13 Apr 1993 23:59:57


|> Our Siberian Husky, Nikita, may be the exception, but:
|>

|> >
|> > These are obvious differences, but remember that since Mals are larger,
|> > things that apply to both dogs tend to "amplified" with Mals.  For example,
|> > distructive behavior for bored Mals can be much worse than with bored Sibs.
|> >
|> > I use this as an example to highlight the point made in the FAQ's for these
|> > breeds, that these are working breeds and need something to do.  You do not
|> > have to mush, but you do need to occupy their minds.  Obedience, agility,
|> > hiking, and so on.
|>
|> As an ***, Nikita is pretty sedentary. In her first five years,
|> I used to walk her 1/2 hour in the morning and 1/2 hour+ after
|> school, whether she needed it or not. Now that I have a job it is
|> not a daily occurance, to say the least. Yet Nikita just sleeps
|> away the day and is not too demanding in the evening (a bit of
|> play, either outside or with a toy indoors).
|>
|> >
|> > Remember that neither of these breeds are "easy breeds."  They can be
|> > quite a challenge.  Their cleverness, tenacity, and desire to work
|> > can be a problem for the average pet owner.
|> >
|> It is my feeling that the first or second 'incidents' are the
|> most important. One must have the time and be alert when one
|> first gets a Siberian. Make sure you correct their behaviour
|> right away or else its a lost cause.
|>
|> > Alaskan Malamutes tend to be more "cuddly" than Siberian Huskies (on the average).
|> > Alaskan Malamutes are essentially big teddy bears, whereas Sibs canbe a bit more
|> > aloof.  Depending on what you are looking for, this can be attractive to you
|> > or somewhat unappealing.  
|>
|> And I thought Nikita was a suck! She is the most affectionette
|> dog I've known! We've been thinking about a second dog... and a
|> Malamute has crossed our minds. Maybe its time!
|>
|> ------------------------------------------------------------
|> Doug Johnson                      "Until the lions have their
|> Smithers, British Columbia         historians, tales of hunting
|> CANADA                             will always glorify the hunter"
|>                                 -African saying

My experience with Sibs has been that they are *very* work oriented and seem
to be waiting around for something to do.  You must indeed have one of those
fabled "Hearth Huskies".  My guess is the breeder may have bred for such a
temperment (kind of unusual).  Have you tried to work Nikita at all?  Sometimes
(not always) when Huskies are mush-pots they tend to not like to work.

Malamutes, while they are cuddly have a stubborn and mischievious streak.  Like
the Sibs I know, they also have a lot of energy.  This is the trait that most
Northern Breeds have that makes them good workers.

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Mals vs. Sibs

Post by Mike Jon » Fri, 16 Apr 1993 02:19:27



Quote:


>>: You might also want to look into Samoyeds. They're related to Mals and Sibs
>>: as a breed and are midway between the two in most characteristics (including
>>: size). They seem to be somewhat more people oriented than either Mals or
>>: Sibs. Unfortunately, there's no Samoyed FAQ.
>>That people oriented may come in part from the Samoyeds use a a herding dog.
>>Herding breeds tend to be very people oriented.  Yes there are even
>>Samoyeds herding today.  If I get one in the future (it's a good
>>compromise breed for Dan and I) I know the breeders I'll go with.  They
>>check health, show in breed and obedience, temperament test and herding
>>instinct test.  I like that.
>Actually, Sibs were used to herd reindeer.  Hard to imagine! :-)

Really? I had always heard that Sammys were used for herding caribou, but
I'm becoming dubions about that. I recently picked up a copy of "The New
Complete Samoyed", and they say the following about the origin of the breed:

    Dr. Nansen's (Norwegian explorer who brought the first Samoyeds to the
  West) account of his first meeting with th edogs reads: "Many of them
  appeared to be well-bred animals, longhaired, snow-white, with upstanding
  ears and pointed muzzles. With their gentle, good-natured-looking faces,
  they at once ingratiated themselves into the affections.  Some of them
  resembled a fox, and had shorter coats, while others were black or
  spotted. Evidently they were of different races, and some of the betrayed
  by their drooping ears, a strong admixture of European ***."
    What Nansen saw as a difference in the dogs stemmed from a difference in
  the people that owned them. There were two types of Samoyed tribes--one
  nomadic, the other pastoral--and each had their own kind of dog.
    The nomadic Samoyed tribes had the all-white *Bjelkier* dogs, who served
  as hunting and draught dogs for their owners. *Bjelkier* means "white dog
  that breeds white." In native usage, the term was also applied to the
  ermine, the white fox, and the white bear.
    The past***tribes had dogs of the Renvall-Hund or Elkhound type. Some
  were white, some black and white, some brown and white.

They imply later that only the past***tribes' dogs were used for herding.
I'd really like to know who the breeder is that does herding instinct test,
though.
Samoyeds were a favorite dog of polar exploration teams around the turn of
the century. Roald Amundsen's expedition to the South Pole had a Samoyed as
lead dog!
Other interesting note - after having heard the name pronounced as SAM-oyed
and sam-OY-ed, the book (and the Samoyed Club of America) insists that the
proper pronounciation is sammy-YED.


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