New Addition

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New Addition

Post by Rachel A Pea » Sun, 08 Nov 1992 03:53:19



Hey there, everyone. Just wanted to update you on the progress of the
new addition to my family - a 60 mo. old Shepard Mix named Jessica Ann
- Jessye to her friends. I've had her two days and I'm still very
nervous  about being able to care for her properly, probably too much
so.
 Her crate training is going along well and I've only had to stop her
mid-piss in the hallway to boogey her outside. I think she's beginning
to get the general idea but I have no idea how long it will take for
her to graduate out of the crate and be trusted to either hold it in
or let someone know it's time to go outside. Any advice is appreciated!

I have a feeling she was abandoned shortly before she made it over to
the
Boston Animal Rescue League since she is very needy and gets VERY
nerovus when we have to go outside or walk away from the house for
longer than 5 minutes. I think she has a fair amount of Collie in her
as well since here head is ver "Collie Like" in shape and thinness (or
Afghan Hound) and she whines and bards alot to get her point across. This
was concerning me this morning since all she was doing on the front
porch this orning was shining and barking and just trying to get
SOMETHING across thiugh I didn't know what. I finally decided she was
just playing around and nothing was wrong (thise days, the way I've
been so keyed up about her, every time she makes a sound I figure
something is wrong. Does anyone have an amazing talking dog like this
one?

Anyway, that's enough for now. Is it any wonder that I've been known
to go on about my cats for days?

Take Care
Rachel

 
 
 

New Addition

Post by Steven Luba » Mon, 23 Nov 1992 10:07:21


Hello dog lovers.  My sister adopted a greyhound from a local
racetrack about 2 months ago.  Lucy (the dog) is about 2 years old.
She started out very shy, but has become somewhat bolder as she's
become accustomed to life with my sister and her two children
(a boy and a girl, aged 11 and 9).  She spends a lot of her time
trying to play with and eat things that are not good for her
(action figures, pantyhose, chicken bones, etc.).  The only things
within her reach are her own chew toys, but inevitably she gets
ahold of something she shouldn't.

Here's the problem:  When we try to get something away from her
that she's playing with or eating, she will bare her teeth and growl
in a very scary way.  Once in a while she'll even take a nip at us.
I don't think she's trying to hurt us, I just think that's the
only way she knows how to protect whatever she's got.  This behavior
is relatively new and seems to be getting more frequent as she
gets more comfortable in her environment.

My sister got in touch with some representatives from Greyhound
Pets of America, but they deny that greyhounds are capable of this
sort of behavior.  Any suggestions?  We're interested in knowing
if anyone has seen this kind of behavior before and, if so, what
can be done about it (is there effective discipline?  how about
obedience school?).  We're very much appreciative.  Please
reply directly via e-mail as my company doesn't receive any of
the rec.* groups.

                                        Thanks,

                                        Steve

 
 
 

New Addition

Post by r hard » Mon, 23 Nov 1992 22:18:53


Get a copy of Koehler, ``The Koehler Method of Dog Training,'' and
do what it ways, omitting nothing.

It's a wonderful method, but in addition has a reputation even among
enemies of curing biting.

Commentary on Koehler is in Vicki Hearne's ``Adam's Task: Calling Animals
by Name'' that is helpful in understanding what you're doing when you
do what he says.

 
 
 

New Addition

Post by Marla Belzowski (K-9' » Wed, 25 Nov 1992 00:44:25


Quote:

>Get a copy of Koehler, ``The Koehler Method of Dog Training,'' and
>do what it ways, omitting nothing.

NO DON`T!!!  Jeezz you want to wreck that dog?  Greyhounds are NOT
dobies!!!  The problem with this dogs
is probably that it ws raised in an environment where it had to
fight for it`s food.  Koehler will totally blow this dog`s mind.
Instead, get a large bone and a pop-can filled with a few penny`S and
tape the top.  You may also want a squirt gun.  Put the dog on leash
and make him/her sit.  Give her part of the bone and hold on to the
other end of the bone.  As soon as your give it to the dog, say
"give" and take the bone back.  The dog will probably growl at you, but
don`t give in.  Yell loudly and throw the can on the floor. Stamp
your feet if you need to and get that bone back out of the dog`s mouth.
As soon as the dog lets go.  Give it praise!!  and I mean Praise!!
Immediately, give the bone back to the dog and turn arond and
take it again.  As soon as the dog stops growling as you take the bone
back give the dog the bone for keeps (for a few hours).  

Try again later.  If the dog growls take the bone and do not allow    
it to have the bone until it stops growling.  

Your dog needs to know that you aren`t going to take something from
it forever.  It is an instinctual reaction to being raised where
the only way to survive was to possess the food and growl at any
attempt to take it.

Quote:
>It's a wonderful method, but in addition has a reputation even among
>enemies of curing biting.

It also has a reputation of making fear biters out of normally
*** dogs.

Quote:
>Commentary on Koehler is in Vicki Hearne's ``Adam's Task: Calling Animals
>by Name'' that is helpful in understanding what you're doing when you
>do what he says.

You may also want to try, "Mother knows best", and "How to be your
dog`s best friend" by the Monks of New Skete.  

-----------

Mauii Nikki Belzowski CD CGC TDI CERF
Brittish Legend of Beowulf CD CGC TDI CERF  tri-color collies
Legend`s year of Jubilee    sable and white collie

 
 
 

New Addition

Post by r hard » Wed, 25 Nov 1992 06:15:47


Quote:
Marla Belzowski writes:
>>It's a wonderful method, but in addition has a reputation even among
>>enemies of curing biting.
>It also has a reputation of making fear biters out of normally
>*** dogs.

Oh jeez, no it doesn't.  Koehler gets the dogs after you guys***
them up, that's what I'm complaining about.

The time will come when you won't be around to shake your little
can of pennies to threaten the dog and he'll bite again for some
reason, and you'll be left having to think of a bigger threat.

Koehler teaches character, which is the right way to stop biting.
With no threatening whatsoever.

Give the damn dog a chance.

 
 
 

New Addition

Post by ELAINE_GALLE.. » Tue, 24 Nov 1992 03:13:00


  "Greyhound grabs inappropriate objects, and guard them".
You dog has a lot to learn about living in a family.  She is gaining
confidence in her new environment, and trying to find out how she fits
into her new world.
  This is a good time to get her started in obedience classes. As she
learns, it is almost certain that she will mellow out on the object
guarding.
--- FMail 0.92
 * Origin: HILLCREST COMMUNITY BBS, SAN DIEGO: HST 619-291-0544 (1:202/703)
 
 
 

New Addition

Post by ELAINE_GALLE.. » Sun, 29 Nov 1992 17:14:05


  I agree totally with your analysis of this problem.  This Greyhound
Is in a *** position with this family.  However, your suggestion
of rolling the dog on it's back and pining it's neck is a dangerous
suggestion.  In several cases, these *** dogs fly into a rage at
being treated this way, and bite.  The thought of having a llarg dog
attached to one's face is not a fun thought.
  You are right again that the entire family needs to establish
dominace over this dogs, but this is best accomplished by obedience
training.  From everything I have heard about the nature of
Greyhounds, the dog should respond well and quickly to the training.
--- FMail 0.92
 * Origin: HILLCREST COMMUNITY BBS, SAN DIEGO: HST 619-291-0544 (1:202/703)
 
 
 

New Addition

Post by Valaria Vorl » Tue, 01 Dec 1992 04:11:30


Quote:

> This Greyhound Is in a *** position with this family.  However, your
> suggestion of rolling the dog on it's back and pining it's neck is a
> dangerous
> suggestion.  In several cases, these *** dogs fly into a rage at
> being treated this way, and bite.  The thought of having a llarg dog
> attached to one's face is not a fun thought.
> dominace over this dogs, but this is best accomplished by obedience
> training.  From everything I have heard about the nature of
> Greyhounds, the dog should respond well and quickly to the training.

I definitely agree that such pinning of the dog could be a bad idea,
particularly involving small children in it. Like one other poster though
(sorry I forgot who!) I'm not convinced that this is purely a ***
problem. Is this the ONLY area in which the dog is displaying ***
behaviour? If the dog was kenneled with other dogs for most of it's formative
period with only the bare minimum of human socialization required for a
racing dog, it seems very natural to me that it would have learned guarding
is the ONLY way to keep stuff from the other dogs. Since no _person_ ever
tried to take stuff away, maybe he doesn't know this is different. He's still
in the kennel mindset, and treats people in the only way he has learned, like
they were dogs.

The overal obedience training is always a good idea, but I would personally
agree with dealing with the guarding as a seperate issue, not a ***
issue, but just another thing that the dog does not know and needs to be
taught.

--
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Pride,where wit fails,steps in to our defense,


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *                         An Essay On Criticism