Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

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Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Paul Motchan » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00



I have a jumping dog problem. Any Ideas on how to get my dog from
jumping on everyone he is in contact with.

Thanks

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Carly Richmon » Thu, 21 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hi,
I don't know if this will help at all, but my pup is a rather huge, and when
he jumps up it's pretty annoying to say the least. I got the idea somewhere
that a garden spray bottle with water might deter him without having to
physically or hopefully mentally hurt him. I have only had to spray him a
couple of times, and he realises straight away that jumping up isn;t fun.
Also, if you totally ignore him/her when you or visitors first come into
contact with him/her may help to calm down.
 All I can say is that the spray bottle really worked for me in a variety of
situations like him going to grab my dinner. He now sits about 2 metres away
and seems to understand! So if you catch your dog jumping up on someone I
guess firmly say No, then if he doesn;t check, give him a little squirt.
Also, I find telling guests & friends when they meet your dog not to flail
their arms about trying to get the dog to get off helps. Self explanatory,I
guess.  Of course I am no expert and am coming to terms with different
behaviours myself, and am also quite happy to hear any other kinds of
preventative methods from others. Hope this helps a bit!!
Carly and Charlie-Brown
 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Bill Connor » Thu, 21 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hi Carly & Charlie
I'm new to this newsgroup and dog ownership. I learned the same trick just
yesterday. Our 3 month old German Shepherd mix pup likes to grab the kid's
clothes and bite (not hard) when playing. The spray bottle seems to get the
message across. After the spray I correct her and then praise her if she
listens.


Quote:
> Hi,
> I don't know if this will help at all, but my pup is a rather huge, and
when
> he jumps up it's pretty annoying to say the least. I got the idea
somewhere
> that a garden spray bottle with water might deter him without having to
> physically or hopefully mentally hurt him. I have only had to spray him a
> couple of times, and he realises straight away that jumping up isn;t fun.
> Also, if you totally ignore him/her when you or visitors first come into
> contact with him/her may help to calm down.
>  All I can say is that the spray bottle really worked for me in a variety
of
> situations like him going to grab my dinner. He now sits about 2 metres
away
> and seems to understand! So if you catch your dog jumping up on someone I
> guess firmly say No, then if he doesn;t check, give him a little squirt.
> Also, I find telling guests & friends when they meet your dog not to flail
> their arms about trying to get the dog to get off helps. Self
explanatory,I
> guess.  Of course I am no expert and am coming to terms with different
> behaviours myself, and am also quite happy to hear any other kinds of
> preventative methods from others. Hope this helps a bit!!
> Carly and Charlie-Brown

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by avrama gingol » Fri, 22 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> I have a jumping dog problem. Any Ideas on how to get my dog from
> jumping on everyone he is in contact with.

> Thanks

Teach him to sit on command, and teach your friends and neighbors that they
are NOT to pet the dog when he jumps, but to do so when he sits politely.

avrama

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by D & » Sat, 23 Oct 1999 04:00:00


try a water bottle, i didn't think it would work, but it did, you squirt the
dog when they do whatever it is you don't want them to do, like jumping up,
you have to do it that very instant though
try that, if it doesn't work, there are dozens of other little tricks to use
Quote:



>> I have a jumping dog problem. Any Ideas on how to get my dog from
>> jumping on everyone he is in contact with.

>> Thanks

>Teach him to sit on command, and teach your friends and neighbors that they
>are NOT to pet the dog when he jumps, but to do so when he sits politely.

>avrama

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Karen Hollan » Mon, 25 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hi Carly,

new to this group. Interested to get any advise on jumping dogs.  Noticed
your reply with interest  and wondered if you could give any further advice
on the water spray technique.  We have an adorable Airedale  apart from the
fact he loves to jump up at visitors, not us so much.  I contacted a dog
trainer who recommended a pump action water pistol - which I was to leave
outside.  Guests would enter the front door  armed and sqirt away.  Bliss I
thought! - short lived.  Hector thought it was a great game and jumped even
higher to drink the water.  In all fairness we didn't really give it long
enough.  So shall start the process again but this time have our water
pistol will be connected to the water mains!
P.S  word of advise to others who use this method.  Please ask all visitors
to take it seriously unlike my dad who really helped matters by squirting
the pistol through the letter box!  Really calmed our boy down ;)

Quote:

>Hi,
>I don't know if this will help at all, but my pup is a rather huge, and
when
>he jumps up it's pretty annoying to say the least. I got the idea somewhere
>that a garden spray bottle with water might deter him without having to
>physically or hopefully mentally hurt him. I have only had to spray him a
>couple of times, and he realises straight away that jumping up isn;t fun.
>Also, if you totally ignore him/her when you or visitors first come into
>contact with him/her may help to calm down.
> All I can say is that the spray bottle really worked for me in a variety
of
>situations like him going to grab my dinner. He now sits about 2 metres
away
>and seems to understand! So if you catch your dog jumping up on someone I
>guess firmly say No, then if he doesn;t check, give him a little squirt.
>Also, I find telling guests & friends when they meet your dog not to flail
>their arms about trying to get the dog to get off helps. Self explanatory,I
>guess.  Of course I am no expert and am coming to terms with different
>behaviours myself, and am also quite happy to hear any other kinds of
>preventative methods from others. Hope this helps a bit!!
>Carly and Charlie-Brown

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by KauilaPo » Mon, 25 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I am not saying this would work with a dog jumping on people, nor with a bigger
dog, but I have a chihauhau who loved to join whoever sat on the livingroom
couch. One day a friend of ours, who has a very matter of fact, easy-going
mannerism, (a sweet girl who always seemed very passive) noticed little
Scrappy-dog just about mid-air between the floor and the seat next to her. Very
casually, almost in slow-motion the girl stuck her hand out with the palm side
facing dog. Dog collided head on with her hand and skid to a stop and landed at
her feet with a thump. I stood there with my mouth open.All she said was,"It
worked didn't it?" It worked...and Scrappy NEVER jumped on that couch again
(when SHE was on it).
 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by BlondieNBri » Wed, 27 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Hi, I just tonight posted a question about a puppy that jumps up. While it is
not working very well with her, I have had success in the past by taking a paw
(or lower leg) in each hand, and gently putting them back on the ground, by
kneeling. Then once they are down there I have her sit and praise her. I also
make a point of giving her treats when she gets down. Or if I am doing
something that usually accompanies her jumping, and she doesn't jump (like
coming home at night) I sit or crouch down and pet her and praise her.
Of course I have gotten a dog that this isn't working well on. But, it seems to
have worked well in the past. And even currently on a lab X I am also caring
for.

Denise

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by D & » Wed, 27 Oct 1999 04:00:00


try a water bottle, squirt the dog every time it jumps
it doesn't work for everybody
but it did work for us
very bullheaded dog too

Quote:
>Hi, I just tonight posted a question about a puppy that jumps up. While it
is
>not working very well with her, I have had success in the past by taking a
paw
>(or lower leg) in each hand, and gently putting them back on the ground, by
>kneeling. Then once they are down there I have her sit and praise her. I
also
>make a point of giving her treats when she gets down. Or if I am doing
>something that usually accompanies her jumping, and she doesn't jump (like
>coming home at night) I sit or crouch down and pet her and praise her.
>Of course I have gotten a dog that this isn't working well on. But, it
seems to
>have worked well in the past. And even currently on a lab X I am also
caring
>for.

>Denise

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Mark Sh » Wed, 27 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>Hi, I just tonight posted a question about a puppy that jumps up. While it is
>not working very well with her, I have had success in the past by taking a paw
>(or lower leg) in each hand, and gently putting them back on the ground, by
>kneeling. Then once they are down there I have her sit and praise her. I also
>make a point of giving her treats when she gets down. Or if I am doing
>something that usually accompanies her jumping, and she doesn't jump (like
>coming home at night) I sit or crouch down and pet her and praise her.

A couple more things to try:

Instead of taking the paw and putting it on the ground, take both paws
and hold them while otherwise ignoring the dog.  This is mildly unpleasant
for most dogs, so she should struggle to get down within a few seconds.
Let her down and praise her.

Lift your knee when she jumps.  Be careful with this, though -- you don't
want to slam it into her by any means, and certainly not into her muzzle.
You want the knee to present a passive obstacle to her chest.

Press *lightly* on her back paws with your toes.  As with the knee trick,
be very carful with this; it's easy to hurt her paws if you lose your
balance.  The idea is to provide a mildly uncomfortable distraction, not
pain.

--
Mark Shaw (and Maggie)   PGP public key at ftp.netcom.com:/pub/ms/mshaw
=======================================================================
"Things that upset a terrier may pass  
virtually unnoticed by a Great Dane."                     -Smiley Blanton

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Jerry How » Thu, 28 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



> >Hi, I just tonight posted a question about a puppy that jumps up. While it is
> >not working very well with her, I have had success in the past by taking a paw
> >(or lower leg) in each hand, and gently putting them back on the ground, by
> >kneeling. Then once they are down there I have her sit and praise her. I also
> >make a point of giving her treats when she gets down. Or if I am doing
> >something that usually accompanies her jumping, and she doesn't jump (like
> >coming home at night) I sit or crouch down and pet her and praise her.

> A couple more things to try:

> Instead of taking the paw and putting it on the ground, take both paws
> and hold them while otherwise ignoring the dog.  This is mildly unpleasant
> for most dogs, so she should struggle to get down within a few seconds.
> Let her down and praise her.

> Lift your knee when she jumps.  Be careful with this, though -- you don't
> want to slam it into her by any means, and certainly not into her muzzle.
> You want the knee to present a passive obstacle to her chest.

> Press *lightly* on her back paws with your toes.  As with the knee trick,
> be very carful with this; it's easy to hurt her paws if you lose your
> balance.  The idea is to provide a mildly uncomfortable distraction, not
> pain.

> --
> Mark Shaw (and Maggie)   PGP public key at ftp.netcom.com:/pub/ms/mshaw
> =======================================================================
> "Things that upset a terrier may pass
> virtually unnoticed by a Great Dane."                     -Smiley Blanton

That's about the worst advice you can get, bar none, anywhere.

You should be ashamed of yourself.

;-) DRAINING THE SWAMP, AND RELOCATING THE GATORS... J>>>

"CUSTOM WILL RECONCILE PEOPLE TO ANY ATROCITY." G.B. Shaw.

"I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the
greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious
truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which
they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly taught to others,
and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their
lives."
                                             Leo Tolstoy

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated more
complaints to my personal email than any other controversial post I have
made to date, bar none?:
                                            caveat
If you have to do things to your dog to train him, that you would
rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing them. If you
have a dog trainer that tells you to jerk your dog around, ***him,
pinch his ears, or twist his toes, shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, or
punish him in any manner, that corrections are appropriate, that the
dog won't think of you as the punisher, or that corrections are not
harmful, or if they can't train your dog to do what you want, look for a
trainer that knows Howe.

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Wits' End Dog Training

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
                      -Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a problem,
bungle it and make it more difficult for all who come after.  Who
ever can't hit the nail on the head should, please, not hit at all.
                     -Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are learned
qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged, develop
and continue to grow exponentially, to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on praising split
seconds of canine thought, strategy, and timing, not mindless hours of
forced repetition, constant corrections, and scolding.
                  -Jerry Howe-

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Jerry How » Fri, 29 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have a jumping dog problem. Any Ideas on how to get my dog from
> jumping on everyone he is in contact with.

> Thanks

Hello Paul,

Try this:

Any time we interact in a behavior by telling the dog no, or
physically restrain or correct him, we are becoming part of the
behavior, either as a player or competitor in the dogs mischief.

Using sound as a distraction must always be followed by immediate,
prolonged, non physical praise. Interrupting a behavior with sound
should never be associated with us, as in voicing no, or telling the
dog to stop it.

The behavior should not be distracted with any intervention. We want
the behavior to begin again, so that we may have another opportunity
to properly address the behavior with another sound and praise.

That way, we can completely end a problem while the dog is thinking
about it, and we are prepared to address the issue before it becomes
out of control. The sound must never occur twice in a row from the
same direction.

In other words, if you snapped your fingers in front of the dog to
stop him from chewing on your shoelace, you'd praise him for five to
fif*** seconds immediately upon snapping your fingers.

The behavior will hopefully resume, and the next sound of the snap of
your fingers must come from behind the dog, or even from a friend
assisting from across the room, from a soda can with a few pennies in
it, or any source of sound (except our voice!), followed by prolonged
non physical praise, until the dog is no longer thinking about the
behavior or resumes it.

The third interruption of the behavior usually gets the message
across, and the dog will think about the behavior for just a moment
before engaging in it once again for the fourth and last time... That
split second thinking about engaging in the behavior requires praise.
Do not react to it with a challenge of shouting no, or physically
removing the temptation.

That moment of thinking about resuming the behavior and the praise it
earns him will validate the prior interruptions of that behavior.

The dog then needs to test it out, to be sure that the same behavior
will be dealt with in exactly the same manner. They will usually make
a fourth attempt at the behavior, and if you follow through
appropriately, he will learn not to do that behavior anymore. But
only on the one shoelace! He must take that
behavior to other instances to fully cease the desire for the
behavior.

The behavior will not be completely broken until he has taken the
process of elimination to the second, third, and fourth opportunity
to explore that behavior. And, even at that, you may need to repeat
the process in four completely different places. That means that the
worst behavior may need up to sixty-four properly timed interruptions
and praise. Usually it happens much quicker than that.

Breaking a behavior in this manner reduces stress, takes us out of
the position of negative enforcer or competitor or playmate, and
allows the dog to extinguish a behavior because he simply doesn't get
any satisfaction from it. The other secret is giving the dog a payoff
for every time they look at you. Each time you
notice eye contact from your dog, you must praise him orally, to
prevent his idle mind from doing the devils work.

You can get all the information you need to properly handle and train
your dog without force, fear, confrontation, scolding, or punishment
in the Wits' End Dog Training Method manual available for FREE at:
http://www.moonsgarden.com/
;-) DRAINING THE SWAMP, AND RELOCATING THE GATORS... J>>>

"CUSTOM WILL RECONCILE PEOPLE TO ANY ATROCITY." G.B. Shaw.

"I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the
greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most
obvious
truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions
which
they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, proudly taught to
others,
and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their

lives."
                                             Leo Tolstoy

Is it any wonder that the following sig file has generated more
complaints to my personal email than any other controversial post I
have
made to date, bar none?:
                                            caveat
If you have to do things to your dog to train him, that you would
rather not have to do, then you shouldn't be doing them. If you
have a dog trainer that tells you to jerk your dog around, ***him,

pinch his ears, or twist his toes, shock, shake, slap, scold, hit, or

punish him in any manner, that corrections are appropriate, that the
dog won't think of you as the punisher, or that corrections are not
harmful, or if they can't train your dog to do what you want, look
for a
trainer that knows Howe.

Sincerely,
Jerry Howe,
Wits' End Dog Training

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Nature, to be mastered, must be obeyed.
                      -Francis Bacon-

There are terrible people who, instead of solving a problem,
bungle it and make it more difficult for all who come after.  Who
ever can't hit the nail on the head should, please, not hit at all.
                     -Nietzsche-

The abilities to think, rationalize and solve problems are learned
qualities.

The Wits' End Dog Training Method challenges the learning
centers in the dogs brain. These centers, once challenged, develop
and continue to grow exponentially, to make him smarter.

The Wits' End Dog Training method capitalizes on praising split
seconds of canine thought, strategy, and timing, not mindless hours
of
forced repetition, constant corrections, and scolding.
                  -Jerry Howe-

 
 
 

Jumping dog, how do you stop this behavior?

Post by Ryan » Sat, 30 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Who tells the dog it is only allowed to repeat this behaviour four
times?