Barking, Barking, Barking , HELP

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Barking, Barking, Barking , HELP

Post by K.Spraggett/A.Davi » Mon, 26 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Our ten month old Dalmatian/Golden Retriever cross is very good natured and
friendly.  But when she's confronted by strangers in the hallway of our
apartment building or when she hears sounds of the other tenants coming and
going she barks, and barks.  She gets particularly exited when she sees
strangers going through the dumpster out back (which could be a good
thing!).
She's obviously trying to protect our turf, but how to we get her to
understand that the we share the building with a whole lot of other folks?
I think she'll eventually settle down but my housemate is ready to muzzle
her, HELP!

 
 
 

Barking, Barking, Barking , HELP

Post by Dais » Tue, 27 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Our ten month old Dalmatian/Golden Retriever cross is very good natured and
>friendly.  But when she's confronted by strangers in the hallway of our
>apartment building or when she hears sounds of the other tenants coming and
>going she barks, and barks.  She gets particularly exited when she sees
>strangers going through the dumpster out back (which could be a good
>thing!).
>She's obviously trying to protect our turf, but how to we get her to
>understand that the we share the building with a whole lot of other folks?
>I think she'll eventually settle down but my housemate is ready to muzzle
>her, HELP!


Hi.  She probably won't settle down much at all on her own, sorry
to say.  :-)  What do you do now when she barks?  If you say
"It's OK, it's OK, settle down" and pet her trying to calm her,
what you're really doing is praising and rewarding the barking.
What you need to do instead is reward her for being quiet and
correct her barking.  How much obedience training have the two of
you had?  There are various ways to teach dogs to be quiet, but
all the ways work best if you have already established an
obedience relationship with your dog.  Until we start obedience
with them, they don't really have much of an idea that we could
be trying to communicate something meaningful to them when we try
to direct their behavior.  And until she learns what it means
when you issue commands, she might just think that when you say
"shhhhh, quiet, shhhhh, quiet" what you are really saying is
"Yeah, what the heck is that, who is that person, what is going
on, let's bark bark bark."  :-)  Even if you act agitated, it's
easy for a dog with no training to think you are agitated at the
same thing she's agitated at -- the other people -- and not at
her behavior.  

If you are already in training with her, then you surely have
learned about some standard corrections... You can try keeping
her on a leash with a training collar (whatever collar you are
using, but my personal favorite is the pinch collar) and then
when she barks, you can give her a collar pop and tell her
whatever quiet command you decide on.  When she gets quiet,
praise her.  Take her to lots of places and praise her whenever
she manages to stay quiet as a person is nearby.  If the collar
pop doesn't seem to do it, you might try holding her muzzle
closed.  I'm sure you can see how having a good solid sit/stay
can help you with this!  It's pretty hard to hold the muzzle of a
dog who is lurching all over the place trying to get away.  :-)  

As for the specific people in your apartment complex, you might
want to try talking to them individually and telling them you are
trying to solve this problem and you think it would help for her
to get to know them -- you can give them some dog treats and
arrange to meet them in the hallway with your dog.  Again here is
where you want her to already know a good sit/stay, because you
don't want the people just giving her treats as she barks her
head off at them and jumps on them, because then she learns to
continue to bark because the people will feed her!  You'll want
to put her in a sit/stay, and then let the people give her the
treat and gently pet her while she maintains her sit.  

Other possible corrections for excessive barking are spraying
water from a water bottle in the dog's face and shaking a can
full of pennies at her.  The penny can can make some dogs even
more e***d and more barky, so don't continue to use it if she
reacts this way.  But if the sound scares her and she immediately
quiets down, the penny can can work great.  The idea is that you
use the correction with a verbal command, so that eventually you
get the behavior you want with just the verbal command, so you
don't have to correct your dog forever.  She might need some
periodic reminders, but eventually she should be able to not bark
at people you meet in the hall or on the street at all.  Same for
people in the garbage.  

In addition, many people have successfully taught their dogs that
it's OK to bark when someone knocks on the door, but that they
are not to bark after their owner tells them they've barked
enough, and they are not to bark at people on the street.  To do
this just don't correct the first bark when she barks when
someone is at your door, but after she's given her warning tell
her something like "Thank you, now QUIET" (or whatever your quiet
command might be...)  And then correct any barking that continues
to occur after your command to be quiet has been issued.  

take care!
Daisy

 
 
 

Barking, Barking, Barking , HELP

Post by TheBea » Tue, 27 Jan 1998 04:00:00


The other person that responded to this had great suggestions.  My terrier
was a torture to walk outside, because she'd bark at all people and
children.  I was afraid my neighbors would think she was vicious (and she's
a sweetie really <g>).  I started using the water bottle technique.  I'd let
her bark once or twice to tell me about the situation, and then say "hush".
If she didn't hush, then it was a squirt in the back of the head.  This
broke her of the habit almost immediately.  The shock of water coming out of
no where is unsettling to them.  Now I just have to show her the water
bottle and she knows.  Good luck!

Quote:

>Our ten month old Dalmatian/Golden Retriever cross is very good natured and
>friendly.  But when she's confronted by strangers in the hallway of our
>apartment building or when she hears sounds of the other tenants coming and
>going she barks, and barks.  She gets particularly exited when she sees
>strangers going through the dumpster out back (which could be a good
>thing!).
>She's obviously trying to protect our turf, but how to we get her to
>understand that the we share the building with a whole lot of other folks?
>I think she'll eventually settle down but my housemate is ready to muzzle
>her, HELP!