Sudden death - help wanted please

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Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by SCS.. » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00



On December 30th, my much loved collie-cross Pip died very suddenly.  He had
been behaving normally the day before - very active as he always was, but
seemed unwell and tired when we got up in the morning.  He spent the morning
sleeping in his basket and when he tried to get up to go out at lunchtime, he
couldn't stand.  Over the next 15 minutes he deteriorated rapidly and by the
time we got him to the vets (within 30 minutes) he was almost dead.  He was
put to sleep at 2.15pm.  The vet found he had had a massive haemorrhage into
his abdomen and believed that he had probably had a tumour on his spleen which
had ruptured.  She said that this is a fairly common thing in sudden deaths of
this type (ie seemingly healthy dogs who have had no symptoms).  We did not
have a post-mortem done, partly because I felt at the time it would serve no
purpose, it would not bring him back, and partly because it was obvious that
the vet had done everything she could - his death was so fast that there
really was nothing else that could have been done for him apart from easing
his passing.  We were all terribly shocked by his death, he was only 7 years
old and had never been sick in his life.  I now find myself worrying about
whether I could have picked up that there was something wrong earlier, or done
something for him.  I am also curious about whether in fact it was likely to
be what the vet thought.  Has anyone out there any information or experiences
that might help?

It was nice to read a posting earlier today which refered to the Rainbow
Bridge.  It's a comforting thought to think that Pip is racing around a sunlit
hillside with our old dog Shula, just like they used to.  I hope it is true.

With regards to everyone,

Linda

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by we.. » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> On December 30th, my much loved collie-cross Pip died very suddenly.  He had
> been behaving normally the day before (snip)

Linda, accept my sympathies on your loss.

One of our Salukis went into the vet for a fairly routine mammary tumour
removal, at the age of 11.5. She'd had a chest xray the month before to be
sure we didn't have tumours there, so she'd been on the vet's table sand
examined recently. The morning we took her in for surgery she was acting
totally normally, leaping off the tops of the crates, bouncing around as
much as she ever does, bright eyed and happy.

When the vet put her on the table, she discovered a six inch mass in her
abdomen. They called us and asked what we wanted to do...we said, open her
up and look, then call us back. Had it been some massive cancer (not
unlikely at her age) on her liver, etc, we might have had to make a sadder
decision...but what it was was a mass on her spleen that she was bleeding
into......her spleen had essentialy ruptured.

We had a happier ending. Squirrel made it though the major surgery, and
the mammary tumor (that one, anyway) was benign.  BUT, had we not already
had a reason to have her at the vet, it seems likely that she would have
gone the way of your baby, or even just not awakened one morning...within
a few days, most likely. It was sheer luck that it was caught the way it
was. I got the impression from my vet that these are not uncommon, but are
probably diagnosed less simply because they die before making it to the
vet, and are then not autopsied....

--
Wendy Duggan
Kyzyl Kum Salukis-Smooth & Feathered

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Sarah La » Fri, 12 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>time we got him to the vets (within 30 minutes) he was almost dead.  He was
>put to sleep at 2.15pm.  The vet found he had had a massive haemorrhage into
>his abdomen and believed that he had probably had a tumour on his spleen which
>had ruptured.  She said that this is a fairly common thing in sudden deaths of
>this type (ie seemingly healthy dogs who have had no symptoms).

Linda,
About 2 weeks ago I was presented with a 5 year old Golden Retriever who
was "a bit off" all of a sudden. He was only slightly depressed when he
walked in the door but within 30 mins of being put in a hospital cage,
deteriorated rapidly. Having felt a large abdominal mass and fearing a
foreign body may have ruptured the gut, I immediately operated and found
a huge spleen riddled with tumours which had ruptured and an abdomen
rapidly filling with ***.

This dog had absolutely no symptoms until it started to bleed. Don't feel
guilty.

Your vet was probably right. It can happen THAT FAST! I'm really sorry to
hear about your loss, and it sounds like you have a very good and caring
vet.

Sarah Ladd BVSc

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Dear Linda,

I join you in grieving the loss of your precious Pip.  I am also in
mourning as my 9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away at home 2 days
ago (Thursday, Jan. 11) under what sounds like similar circumstances to
Pip.

Sampson had always been an extremely heatlthy and active dog - he seemed
like a puppy all his life; never slowed down.  He suddenly developed
fluid retention on his hind leg and black & blue discoloration over much
of his body.  He also became tired and listless.  I rushed him to the vet
as soon as this appeared (Tuesday, Jan. 9) where *** work was taken and
it was determined that his red *** cell count was half of what it
should be.  Several small lumps were also discovered under all his hair!
The vet said it could be any number of things - one of them possibly a
cancer that had spread into his spleen and was causing rupturing and
hemorrhaging under his skin.  He was given a shot of cortisone and
vitamin K.  The vet said to watch him all night and rush him to the
emergency clinic for a transfusion if he seemed to be slipping.  

On Wednesday Sampson seemed better - trotting through the house, eating
well, etc.  Just a little more slowed-down than usual.  My mother came to
spend the night in case I needed her to stay with him when I went to
work/school.  The lab reports came in Thursday morning and revealed that
Sampson's body was killing off his red *** cells.  The vet recommended
Prednizone treatment to see if it would halt the situation.  I began to
get ready (take a shower) to go to vet's to pick up the Prednizone.  
Sampson's breathing was a little labored (which I had told the vet
about), but it didn't seem like anything dangerous.  I took about a
5-minute shower and when I came out, Sampson was gone!!!!!!  My mother
was in the next room and said she had not heard a whimper, a cry, heavy
breathing, coughing, nothing......I was astounded at how quickly and
suddently Sampson passed away.  Apparently whatever had been circulating
in his system was too much for his heart.

Linda, I think when a beloved pet passes away, we tend to blame ourselves
for what we should or should not have done.  I want to encourage you (and
me!!!!) that we did EVERYTHING we could do for our babies because we
loved them.  I lost 2 other dogs in the past 8 years - both were very ill
and suffered quite a bit before I made the decision to have them put to
sleep.  Pip and Sampson were VERY fortunate to not have to go through
prolonged illnesses and pain.  

I miss Sampson more than I can say as I know you do Pip - I hope that we
will see them and all of our beloved pets again someday!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Linda,

I join with you in mourning the loss of Pip.  I am also in mourning - my
9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away suddenly at home 2 days ago,
January 11 under what sounds like similar circumstances to Pip.  

Sampson had NEVER been sick...in early November, he had a cyst that
ruptured on his elbow and was but on antiobiotics.  About 2 weeks later
he began limping on the opposite front leg.  The vet said it looked and
felt like another cyst had appeared.  She took x-rays and some fluid from
the lump but began treating it as a cyst with ANOTHER round of
antibiotics.  I was going out of town for the month of December.  The
Friday before I left I received a call on my answering machine from the
vet saying the lab report "THOUGHT" the lump was malignant and
recommended surgery.  I observed Sampson over the weekend and by Monday
he was not limping at all and jumping around as he always had.  The vet
was not available, so I called the kennel owners where I would be
boarding Sampson and explained the situation.  They said if that lump had
been cancerous, the antiobiotics would not have worked.  Also, they said
that if it was indeed cancer, putting an older dog through surgery rarely
increased the lifespan very much.  So, as he was perfectly well, I
boarded Sampson with instructions to take him to the vet immediately if
he started limping again.

While gone, I called the kennel several times & they said he was perfect
- the lump was gone and he was jumping around as usual.  When I returned
a month later, I arrived at the kennel to discover that just that morning
Sampson had been acting tired and black & blue spots were on much of his
body!!!  I took him immediately to the vet who said it looked like some
type of *** disorder.  *** work was done and Sam's red *** cell
count was half of what it should be.  Sampson was given a shot of
cortisone and vitamin K and the vet said to keep an eye on him and he
would call me with the lab results as soon as they came in.  That was
Tuesday - lab results came in Thursday morning that his body was killing
off his red *** cells and could be a result of the cancer spreading
into his spleen and causing rupturing and hemorrhaging under the skin.  
The vet prescribed a period of prednizone to see if it would go into
remission.

Sampson had seemed very tired the last couple of days, but was able to
walk, eating well, and bright-eyed.  After speaking with the vet Thursday
morning, I observed that Sampson was breathing a little heavier, but did
not seem anything dangerous.  I went into the bathroom to take a shower
and when I came out (5 minutes maximum), Sampson was gone.  My mother had
come to be with me - she was in the adjoining room and had not heard a
sound!!!  I was stunned that he could pass away that quickly!

I think when a beloved pet passes away (this is my third in 8 years!) we
tend to think we could have done something.  I'm now wondering if I
should have had the original tumor removed, but I made the best decision
I could with the information I had and under the circumstances.  I want
to encourage you that you did everything possible for Pip and I think
both of our dogs are extremely fortunate that they did not suffer weeks
and months of pain and discomfort.  I had 2 previous dogs that were ill
for a long time and both had to be put to sleep - the way that Pip and
Sampson passed is MUCH preferable to that!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Linda,

I join with you in mourning the loss of Pip.  I am also in mourning - my
9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away suddenly at home 2 days ago,
January 11 under what sounds like similar circumstances to Pip.  

Sampson had NEVER been sick...in early November, he had a cyst that
ruptured on his elbow and was but on antiobiotics.  About 2 weeks later
he began limping on the opposite front leg.  The vet said it looked and
felt like another cyst had appeared.  She took x-rays and some fluid from
the lump but began treating it as a cyst with ANOTHER round of
antibiotics.  I was going out of town for the month of December.  The
Friday before I left I received a call on my answering machine from the
vet saying the lab report "THOUGHT" the lump was malignant and
recommended surgery.  I observed Sampson over the weekend and by Monday
he was not limping at all and jumping around as he always had.  The vet
was not available, so I called the kennel owners where I would be
boarding Sampson and explained the situation.  They said if that lump had
been cancerous, the antiobiotics would not have worked.  Also, they said
that if it was indeed cancer, putting an older dog through surgery rarely
increased the lifespan very much.  So, as he was perfectly well, I
boarded Sampson with instructions to take him to the vet immediately if
he started limping again.

While gone, I called the kennel several times & they said he was perfect
- the lump was gone and he was jumping around as usual.  When I returned
a month later, I arrived at the kennel to discover that just that morning
Sampson had been acting tired and black & blue spots were on much of his
body!!!  I took him immediately to the vet who said it looked like some
type of *** disorder.  *** work was done and Sam's red *** cell
count was half of what it should be.  Sampson was given a shot of
cortisone and vitamin K and the vet said to keep an eye on him and he
would call me with the lab results as soon as they came in.  That was
Tuesday - lab results came in Thursday morning that his body was killing
off his red *** cells and could be a result of the cancer spreading
into his spleen and causing rupturing and hemorrhaging under the skin.  
The vet prescribed a period of prednizone to see if it would go into
remission.

Sampson had seemed very tired the last couple of days, but was able to
walk, eating well, and bright-eyed.  After speaking with the vet Thursday
morning, I observed that Sampson was breathing a little heavier, but did
not seem anything dangerous.  I went into the bathroom to take a shower
and when I came out (5 minutes maximum), Sampson was gone.  My mother had
come to be with me - she was in the adjoining room and had not heard a
sound!!!  I was stunned that he could pass away that quickly!

I think when a beloved pet passes away (this is my third in 8 years!) we
tend to think we could have done something.  I'm now wondering if I
should have had the original tumor removed, but I made the best decision
I could with the information I had and under the circumstances.  I want
to encourage you that you did everything possible for Pip and I think
both of our dogs are extremely fortunate that they did not suffer weeks
and months of pain and discomfort.  I had 2 previous dogs that were ill

Quote:
>On December 30th, my much loved collie-cross Pip died very suddenly.  He had
>been behaving normally the day before - very active as he always was, but
>seemed unwell and tired when we got up in the morning.  He spent the morning
>sleeping in his basket and when he tried to get up to go out at lunchtime, he
>couldn't stand.  Over the next 15 minutes he deteriorated rapidly and by the
>time we got him to the vets (within 30 minutes) he was almost dead.  He was
>put to sleep at 2.15pm.  The vet found he had had a massive haemorrhage into
>his abdomen and believed that he had probably had a tumour on his spleen which
>had ruptured.  She said that this is a fairly common thing in sudden deaths of
>this type (ie seemingly healthy dogs who have had no symptoms).  We did not
>have a post-mortem done, partly because I felt at the time it would serve no
>purpose, it would not bring him back, and partly because it was obvious that
>the vet had done everything she could - his death was so fast that there
>really was nothing else that could have been done for him apart from easing
>his passing.  We were all terribly shocked by his death, he was only 7 years
>old and had never been sick in his life.  I now find myself worrying about
>whether I could have picked up that there was something wrong earlier, or done
>something for him.  I am also curious about whether in fact it was likely to
>be what the vet thought.  Has anyone out there any information or experiences
>that might help?

>It was nice to read a posting earlier today which refered to the Rainbow
>Bridge.  It's a comforting thought to think that Pip is racing around a sunlit
>hillside with our old dog Shula, just like they used to.  I hope it is true.

>With regards to everyone,

>Linda

th had to be put to sleep - the way that Pip and
Sampson passed is MUCH preferable to that!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Linda,

I join with you in mourning the loss of Pip.  I am also in mourning - my
9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away suddenly at home 2 days ago,
January 11 under what sounds like similar circumstances to Pip.  

Sampson had NEVER been sick...in early November, he had a cyst that
ruptured on his elbow and was but on antiobiotics.  About 2 weeks later
he began limping on the opposite front leg.  The vet said it looked and
felt like another cyst had appeared.  She took x-rays and some fluid from
the lump but began treating it as a cyst with ANOTHER round of
antibiotics.  I was going out of town for the month of December.  The
Friday before I left I received a call on my answering machine from the
vet saying the lab report "THOUGHT" the lump was malignant and
recommended surgery.  I observed Sampson over the weekend and by Monday
he was not limping at all and jumping around as he always had.  The vet
was not available, so I called the kennel owners where I would be
boarding Sampson and explained the situation.  They said if that lump had
been cancerous, the antiobiotics would not have worked.  Also, they said
that if it was indeed cancer, putting an older dog through surgery rarely
increased the lifespan very much.  So, as he was perfectly well, I
boarded Sampson with instructions to take him to the vet immediately if
he started limping again.

While gone, I called the kennel several times & they said he was perfect
- the lump was gone and he was jumping around as usual.  When I returned
a month later, I arrived at the kennel to discover that just that morning
Sampson had been acting tired and black & blue spots were on much of his
body!!!  I took him immediately to the vet who said it looked like some
type of *** disorder.  *** work was done and Sam's red *** cell
count was half of what it should be.  Sampson was given a shot of
cortisone and vitamin K and the vet said to keep an eye on him and he
would call me with the lab results as soon as they came in.  That was
Tuesday - lab results came in Thursday morning that his body was killing
off his red *** cells and could be a result of the cancer spreading
into his spleen and causing rupturing and hemorrhaging under the skin.  
The vet prescribed a period of prednizone to see if it would go into
remission.

Sampson had seemed very tired the last couple of days, but was able to
walk, eating well, and bright-eyed.  After speaking with the vet Thursday
morning, I observed that Sampson was breathing a little heavier, but did
not seem anything dangerous.  I went into the bathroom to take a shower
and when I came out (5 minutes maximum), Sampson was gone.  My mother had
come to be with me - she was in the adjoining room and had not heard a
sound!!!  I was stunned that he could pass away that quickly!

I think when a beloved pet passes away (this is my third in 8 years!) we
tend to think we could have done something.  I'm now wondering if I
should have had the original tumor removed, but I made the best decision
I could with the information I had and under the circumstances.  I want
to encourage you that you did everything possible for Pip and I think
both of our dogs are extremely fortunate that they did not suffer weeks
and months of pain and discomfort.  I had 2 previous dogs that were ill

Quote:
>On December 30th, my much loved collie-cross Pip died very suddenly.  He had
>been behaving normally the day before - very active as he always was, but
>seemed unwell and tired when we got up in the morning.  He spent the morning
>sleeping in his basket and when he tried to get up to go out at lunchtime, he
>couldn't stand.  Over the next 15 minutes he deteriorated rapidly and by the
>time we got him to the vets (within 30 minutes) he was almost dead.  He was
>put to sleep at 2.15pm.  The vet found he had had a massive haemorrhage into
>his abdomen and believed that he had probably had a tumour on his spleen which
>had ruptured.  She said that this is a fairly common thing in sudden deaths of
>this type (ie seemingly healthy dogs who have had no symptoms).  We did not
>have a post-mortem done, partly because I felt at the time it would serve no
>purpose, it would not bring him back, and partly because it was obvious that
>the vet had done everything she could - his death was so fast that there
>really was nothing else that could have been done for him apart from easing
>his passing.  We were all terribly shocked by his death, he was only 7 years
>old and had never been sick in his life.  I now find myself worrying about
>whether I could have picked up that there was something wrong earlier, or done
>something for him.  I am also curious about whether in fact it was likely to
>be what the vet thought.  Has anyone out there any information or experiences
>that might help?

>It was nice to read a posting earlier today which refered to the Rainbow
>Bridge.  It's a comforting thought to think that Pip is racing around a sunlit
>hillside with our old dog Shula, just like they used to.  I hope it is true.

>With regards to everyone,

>Linda

th had to be put to sleep - the way that Pip and
Sampson passed is MUCH preferable to that!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Linda,

I join with you in mourning the loss of Pip.  I am also in mourning - my
9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away suddenly at home 2 days ago,
January 11 under what sounds like similar circumstances to Pip.  

Sampson had NEVER been sick...in early November, he had a cyst that
ruptured on his elbow and was but on antiobiotics.  About 2 weeks later
he began limping on the opposite front leg.  The vet said it looked and
felt like another cyst had appeared.  She took x-rays and some fluid from
the lump but began treating it as a cyst with ANOTHER round of
antibiotics.  I was going out of town for the month of December.  The
Friday before I left I received a call on my answering machine from the
vet saying the lab report "THOUGHT" the lump was malignant and
recommended surgery.  I observed Sampson over the weekend and by Monday
he was not limping at all and jumping around as he always had.  The vet
was not available, so I called the kennel owners where I would be
boarding Sampson and explained the situation.  They said if that lump had
been cancerous, the antiobiotics would not have worked.  Also, they said
that if it was indeed cancer, putting an older dog through surgery rarely
increased the lifespan very much.  So, as he was perfectly well, I
boarded Sampson with instructions to take him to the vet immediately if
he started limping again.

While gone, I called the kennel several times & they said he was perfect
- the lump was gone and he was jumping around as usual.  When I returned
a month later, I arrived at the kennel to discover that just that morning
Sampson had been acting tired and black & blue spots were on much of his
body!!!  I took him immediately to the vet who said it looked like some
type of *** disorder.  *** work was done and Sam's red *** cell
count was half of what it should be.  Sampson was given a shot of
cortisone and vitamin K and the vet said to keep an eye on him and he
would call me with the lab results as soon as they came in.  That was
Tuesday - lab results came in Thursday morning that his body was killing
off his red *** cells and could be a result of the cancer spreading
into his spleen and causing rupturing and hemorrhaging under the skin.  
The vet prescribed a period of prednizone to see if it would go into
remission.

Sampson had seemed very tired the last couple of days, but was able to
walk, eating well, and bright-eyed.  After speaking with the vet Thursday
morning, I observed that Sampson was breathing a little heavier, but did
not seem anything dangerous.  I went into the bathroom to take a shower
and when I came out (5 minutes maximum), Sampson was gone.  My mother had
come to be with me - she was in the adjoining room and had not heard a
sound!!!  I was stunned that he could pass away that quickly!

I think when a beloved pet passes away (this is my third in 8 years!) we
tend to think we could have done something.  I'm now wondering if I
should have had the original tumor removed, but I made the best decision
I could with the information I had and under the circumstances.  I want
to encourage you that you did everything possible for Pip and I think
both of our dogs are extremely fortunate that they did not suffer weeks
and months of pain and discomfort.  I had 2 previous dogs that were ill
for a long time and both had to be put to sleep - the way that Pip and
Sampson passed is MUCH preferable to that!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla

 
 
 

Sudden death - help wanted please

Post by Rahl » Mon, 15 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Linda,

I join with you in mourning the loss of Pip.  I am also in mourning - my
9-year-old Keeshond, Sampson, passed away suddenly at home 2 days ago,
January 11 under what sounds like similar circumstances to Pip.  

Sampson had NEVER been sick...in early November, he had a cyst that
ruptured on his elbow and was but on antiobiotics.  About 2 weeks later
he began limping on the opposite front leg.  The vet said it looked and
felt like another cyst had appeared.  She took x-rays and some fluid from
the lump but began treating it as a cyst with ANOTHER round of
antibiotics.  I was going out of town for the month of December.  The
Friday before I left I received a call on my answering machine from the
vet saying the lab report "THOUGHT" the lump was malignant and
recommended surgery.  I observed Sampson over the weekend and by Monday
he was not limping at all and jumping around as he always had.  The vet
was not available, so I called the kennel owners where I would be
boarding Sampson and explained the situation.  They said if that lump had
been cancerous, the antiobiotics would not have worked.  Also, they said
that if it was indeed cancer, putting an older dog through surgery rarely
increased the lifespan very much.  So, as he was perfectly well, I
boarded Sampson with instructions to take him to the vet immediately if
he started limping again.

While gone, I called the kennel several times & they said he was perfect
- the lump was gone and he was jumping around as usual.  When I returned
a month later, I arrived at the kennel to discover that just that morning
Sampson had been acting tired and black & blue spots were on much of his
body!!!  I took him immediately to the vet who said it looked like some
type of *** disorder.  *** work was done and Sam's red *** cell
count was half of what it should be.  Sampson was given a shot of
cortisone and vitamin K and the vet said to keep an eye on him and he
would call me with the lab results as soon as they came in.  That was
Tuesday - lab results came in Thursday morning that his body was killing
off his red *** cells and could be a result of the cancer spreading
into his spleen and causing rupturing and hemorrhaging under the skin.  
The vet prescribed a period of prednizone to see if it would go into
remission.

Sampson had seemed very tired the last couple of days, but was able to
walk, eating well, and bright-eyed.  After speaking with the vet Thursday
morning, I observed that Sampson was breathing a little heavier, but did
not seem anything dangerous.  I went into the bathroom to take a shower
and when I came out (5 minutes maximum), Sampson was gone.  My mother had
come to be with me - she was in the adjoining room and had not heard a
sound!!!  I was stunned that he could pass away that quickly!

I think when a beloved pet passes away (this is my third in 8 years!) we
tend to think we could have done something.  I'm now wondering if I
should have had the original tumor removed, but I made the best decision
I could with the information I had and under the circumstances.  I want
to encourage you that you did everything possible for Pip and I think
both of our dogs are extremely fortunate that they did not suffer weeks
and months of pain and discomfort.  I had 2 previous dogs that were ill

Quote:
>On December 30th, my much loved collie-cross Pip died very suddenly.  He had
>been behaving normally the day before - very active as he always was, but
>seemed unwell and tired when we got up in the morning.  He spent the morning
>sleeping in his basket and when he tried to get up to go out at lunchtime, he
>couldn't stand.  Over the next 15 minutes he deteriorated rapidly and by the
>time we got him to the vets (within 30 minutes) he was almost dead.  He was
>put to sleep at 2.15pm.  The vet found he had had a massive haemorrhage into
>his abdomen and believed that he had probably had a tumour on his spleen which
>had ruptured.  She said that this is a fairly common thing in sudden deaths of
>this type (ie seemingly healthy dogs who have had no symptoms).  We did not
>have a post-mortem done, partly because I felt at the time it would serve no
>purpose, it would not bring him back, and partly because it was obvious that
>the vet had done everything she could - his death was so fast that there
>really was nothing else that could have been done for him apart from easing
>his passing.  We were all terribly shocked by his death, he was only 7 years
>old and had never been sick in his life.  I now find myself worrying about
>whether I could have picked up that there was something wrong earlier, or done
>something for him.  I am also curious about whether in fact it was likely to
>be what the vet thought.  Has anyone out there any information or experiences
>that might help?

>It was nice to read a posting earlier today which refered to the Rainbow
>Bridge.  It's a comforting thought to think that Pip is racing around a sunlit
>hillside with our old dog Shula, just like they used to.  I hope it is true.

>With regards to everyone,

>Linda

th had to be put to sleep - the way that Pip and
Sampson passed is MUCH preferable to that!

From one pet lover to another,
Rahla