Free Pattern for Cool Coats (To Keep Dogs Cool in Heat)

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Free Pattern for Cool Coats (To Keep Dogs Cool in Heat)

Post by Jack and Amy Corriga » Mon, 26 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Greyhounds (and other breeds) cannot sweat through their skin to release
heat as humans do. Therefore, your hound pants. Excessive panting is a
sure sign your pet is overheated. Other signs include bright red gums,
lack of coordination and overall physical weakness. Heatstroke can cause
your hound to collapse.

If you're going to have your hound out in the heat, you can take some
precautions to keep him cool. One of those is a "cool coat."  This is a
coat that takes advantage of evaporation to draw heat away from your
hound's body. The cool coat is made out of some material that holds
water well and doused with water. The evaporation action draws the heat
away from your hound's skin.

We've got instructions for three types of cool coats here. One is the
traditional cool coat made out of an old towel. The second uses
high-tech synthetic chamois. The third is an experimental design for a
"cool snood." This third version takes advantage of the fact that ***
runs closest to the skin surface on a hound's throat, chest and ears and
just covers those areas.

You can jump directly to our cool coat instructions at:

    http://www.moonsgarden.com/~bark/coolpat.htm

Hey! And don't laugh because we had to take our photos of cool coats in
the snow.  It just proves how cool these coats are!  <giggle>

Jack & Amy Corrigan
Greyhound Manor Crafts
http://www.moonsgarden.com/~bark

 
 
 

Free Pattern for Cool Coats (To Keep Dogs Cool in Heat)

Post by Kathy I. Morg » Mon, 26 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> Excessive panting is a
> sure sign your pet is overheated.

Ahhh, no, not necessarily. He may be panting because s/he's e***d, or
nervous, or trying to better smell something interesting. Or he may be
sick. You can't tell if the dog is overheated unless you consider the
total situation. Is the weather/room too hot? Has s/he been exercising?
Is there a *** in heat or a rival animal around?

By all means, help your pet cool off if he truly is seriously
overheated; but don't jump to conclusions and cause hypothermia in a dog
that isn't hot.

(/rant) Sorry...it's just that it would be really easy to inadvertently
hurt your dog when you're trying to help it.

kathy in AK