What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

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What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Manade » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00



I have a question for the group..........

I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed two
dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
scenario?

1)  Hound mix puppy that I bottlefed from 4 days of age, she is now six months
old.  *Fully* housebroken - has not had an accident since she was 7 weeks old.
Crate trained, good with cats, *excellent* with children (I have twin two year
olds) and friendly to everyone, has basic obedience training.  Very bonded to
humans as she was a bottle baby....

- I interviewed potential homes (you can be sure I was viligent - I am very
attached to her) The best prospect was a family with two children (6/11) - they
drove for over an hour just to see her and it was love at first sight.  Maggie
loves to fetch, and by the time they left to go home she was passing me by to
bring the toy back to the 11 YO boy.  Maggie *does* have a loud hound voice,
but only uses it when she wants in from outside (scratches at door to go out)
and since they were looking specifically for a hound as an inside only dog, and
they live in the country with a fenced yard, I figured it was a match made in
heaven.  They signed the contract and left.  I called the next morning (monday)
everything was fine.  Tuesday evening the mother called me and told me how
wonderful she was, how friendly, how good with the children, how clean in the
house and then finished the conversation off with the fact that they thought
she was unhappy and they wanted to bring her back.  Fine with me, I love the
dog.  Maggie came back.  She had been with them 48 hours.

2)  I placed a DLH kitten (14 weeks)  with a woman who was wanting a second cat
(indoor only)  The kitten was a little shy at first (she was wearing *lots* of
perfume) but she visited me for 1 1/2 hours and he warmed up considerably.  She
took him home late Sunday afternoon and called me by lunchtime Monday saying
that he was hiding under her couch and hadn't eaten much.  Verdict?  He was
unhappy and wanted to come back home - Less than 20 hours in her home and since
he was not completely "at home" she wanted to bring him back.  Fine with me.  

3)  A Jack Russel - Now, I know you are rolling your eyes at this one, but let
me finish <g>......  I bought Susie for myself 8 months ago as a show prospect.
 She is an absolutely *gorgeous* solid white rough with patch eyes and was
dynamite in the ring.  She does have a high energy level, but is good with
children (remember those 2 / 2 year olds?) and cats.  She is *** to
other dogs and in fact the reason that I decided to rehome her is because my
dogs (I have Aust. Shep) think that Susie is LUNCH.  I have already had to have
her muzzle stitched where my Alpha *** grabbed her and the rest of them just
*want* her.  I finally decided that it was not fair to her to always have to be
separate.  And in truth, it is stressful to have to keep her separate in our
very busy household.  

I answered a post (from rec.dogs) for a couple in my area who wanted a playmate
for their dog.  Since Susie is *not* dog agressive, and the couple had a small
dog (reads something that wouldn't eat her) I emailed them and we discussed at
length her disposition, introducing her to their dog,  and making a smooth
transition into their "family".  They have had her for *3* days when they call
and say that their first dog still isn't accepting her and she has to go.

Now, I assure you that these animals are not unhealthy, untrained,
unmanageable, etc. quite the opposite.  I have discussed with each person what
is involved with making a smooth transition into a new home (for animal and
people alike) and have chosen the new homes carefully.   In the case of the
JRT, the guy told me that they fully expected that the transition would take a
couple of weeks!  So I feel that I am asking the right questions, and getting
the right answers...........  How do you deal with adoptive owners that are
unrealistic when demanding that if a pet does not acclimate fully within a few
hours that they never will??????

I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this far - I
guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
go about this differently in the future.

Thanks,

Robin

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by LA Reidl » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
Robin writes:
> How do you deal with adoptive owners that are
>unrealistic when demanding that if a pet does not acclimate fully within a
>few
>hours that they never will??????

Oh, Robin!  I feel so bad for you!  Seriously, this is a problem with plenty of
our adoptions, also.  I don't think there is any way to completely eliminate
it.  We usually just roll our eyes, and thank goodness the animal was returned
and not just booted out.  

Bottom line is:  The animal itself is not the variable, it is the people.
Meaning, good people will keep even the worst pet, but bad people will not keep
even the best pet.  I wish you the best of luck in the future!

LA Reidler

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Lynn Kosmako » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this far - I
> guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
> go about this differently in the future.

Not that it helps, Robin, but you're not alone in struggling with
this issue.  It was a topic of discussion last week in our local
GSD Rescue because of a recent increase in adoptions coming back.
Some of the measures that were discussed:

1.  Not letting anyone take a dog from an Adoption Day.  Making
it a show-and-tell event only to allow a suitable waiting period
for buyer's remorse.

2.  Putting a 2 day period between approval of an adoption
application and release of a dog, for the same reason.

3.  Requiring the long questionaire and application to be
sent and reviewed before the home inspection is scheduled.
Multiple reviewers, looking for additional questions to ask
the p.a..

4.  Increasing the scope of the written reports prepared by
fosters to include potential problems the adopter might expect
from the dog.

5.  Increasing the basic training put on the dogs before adoption.

6.  Including a generic handout on acclimatization in the adoption
package.

Lynn K.

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Susan Feingo » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Boy, you have had a run of bad luck!!!

I think that the longer you are in rescue, the more that you get a
sort of "feel" for who is the right person for each dog and whether
it is going to work out or not.  You also get a "feel" for what kind
of home you need to find for each dog.  Some dogs can handle
being left alone for long time periods, some can't.  Some dogs
need doggie doors because they will bark if left outside unattended
at all, some don't, etc.

 Our group is extremely lucky in that everyone currently involved in
it is a seasoned, experienced rescuer and we have a *very, very* low
rate of return.  (I would guess 1 out of every 25 dogs).   However,
when I first started out in this I would get a dog returned more
often.   This can't always be predicted, but when I thought back about
it almost everytime the dog was returned I had a little nagging
thought about the adopters initially (even though they passed the
application process with flying colors).   Over the course of time, I
stopped ignoring this intuition (or nagging thought) and started to
pay more attention to it when placing a dog. In our rescue group we
talk about this intuition thing quite often. There are times when we
take a chance and say that our intuition tells us that we shouldn't
adopt the dog to this person, but we are going to take a chance anyway
since it seems like the perfect home --- but often this backfires.
So, I guess what I'm saying is that it does take some experience to
pick the right people and you're just starting out, so give it some
more time.  

Besides experience, there are a few concrete things you can do to
ensure that the dog goes to a permanent home.  First, have the
potential adopters fill out an application form.  People who are
serious about getting a dog don't mind doing this.  Do a home check.
I am a big fan of home checks -- you really get to know more about
the people who are adopting the dog and you get to see their children
(if they have any) in their own element.  Be very, very careful about
adopting to anyone who has children under the age of 5.  Some people
in our group flat out refuse to adopt to anyone with young children
because dogs are returned so often.  And be brutally honest about
any fault that your dog has.  If your dog is a howler or a barker,
tell the owners about it.  For instance, if your dog only howls when
he wants to come in, I would personally ONLY place the dog into a home
that has a doggie door so the dog could go in/out as it pleases.
Last, hand out an official looking document that is called something
like "Congratulations on your new rescue dog" or cat.  In the
document, talk about how animals need at least 2 weeks to 2 months to
adjust to a new home and that some cats can even take more.  Discuss
how to get a current dog to accept a new dog (introducing them very
slowly, not leaving them alone together, using a crate, etc).  Also,
include your phone number and ask them to call you to discuss any
potential problems when they occur so that you can help them
overcome the problems.

-Susan Feingold
Pet Orphans Rescue

Quote:

>I have a question for the group..........
>I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed two
>dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
>scenario?
>1)  Hound mix puppy that I bottlefed from 4 days of age, she is now six months
>old.  *Fully* housebroken - has not had an accident since she was 7 weeks old.
>Crate trained, good with cats, *excellent* with children (I have twin two year
>olds) and friendly to everyone, has basic obedience training.  Very bonded to
>humans as she was a bottle baby....
>- I interviewed potential homes (you can be sure I was viligent - I am very
>attached to her) The best prospect was a family with two children (6/11) - they
>drove for over an hour just to see her and it was love at first sight.  Maggie
>loves to fetch, and by the time they left to go home she was passing me by to
>bring the toy back to the 11 YO boy.  Maggie *does* have a loud hound voice,
>but only uses it when she wants in from outside (scratches at door to go out)
>and since they were looking specifically for a hound as an inside only dog, and
>they live in the country with a fenced yard, I figured it was a match made in
>heaven.  They signed the contract and left.  I called the next morning (monday)
>everything was fine.  Tuesday evening the mother called me and told me how
>wonderful she was, how friendly, how good with the children, how clean in the
>house and then finished the conversation off with the fact that they thought
>she was unhappy and they wanted to bring her back.  Fine with me, I love the
>dog.  Maggie came back.  She had been with them 48 hours.
>2)  I placed a DLH kitten (14 weeks)  with a woman who was wanting a second cat
>(indoor only)  The kitten was a little shy at first (she was wearing *lots* of
>perfume) but she visited me for 1 1/2 hours and he warmed up considerably.  She
>took him home late Sunday afternoon and called me by lunchtime Monday saying
>that he was hiding under her couch and hadn't eaten much.  Verdict?  He was
>unhappy and wanted to come back home - Less than 20 hours in her home and since
>he was not completely "at home" she wanted to bring him back.  Fine with me.  
>3)  A Jack Russel - Now, I know you are rolling your eyes at this one, but let
>me finish <g>......  I bought Susie for myself 8 months ago as a show prospect.
> She is an absolutely *gorgeous* solid white rough with patch eyes and was
>dynamite in the ring.  She does have a high energy level, but is good with
>children (remember those 2 / 2 year olds?) and cats.  She is *** to
>other dogs and in fact the reason that I decided to rehome her is because my
>dogs (I have Aust. Shep) think that Susie is LUNCH.  I have already had to have
>her muzzle stitched where my Alpha *** grabbed her and the rest of them just
>*want* her.  I finally decided that it was not fair to her to always have to be
>separate.  And in truth, it is stressful to have to keep her separate in our
>very busy household.  
>I answered a post (from rec.dogs) for a couple in my area who wanted a playmate
>for their dog.  Since Susie is *not* dog agressive, and the couple had a small
>dog (reads something that wouldn't eat her) I emailed them and we discussed at
>length her disposition, introducing her to their dog,  and making a smooth
>transition into their "family".  They have had her for *3* days when they call
>and say that their first dog still isn't accepting her and she has to go.
>Now, I assure you that these animals are not unhealthy, untrained,
>unmanageable, etc. quite the opposite.  I have discussed with each person what
>is involved with making a smooth transition into a new home (for animal and
>people alike) and have chosen the new homes carefully.   In the case of the
>JRT, the guy told me that they fully expected that the transition would take a
>couple of weeks!  So I feel that I am asking the right questions, and getting
>the right answers...........  How do you deal with adoptive owners that are
>unrealistic when demanding that if a pet does not acclimate fully within a few
>hours that they never will??????
>I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this far - I
>guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
>go about this differently in the future.
>Thanks,
>Robin

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by MEGONS » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> I had a little nagging
>thought about the adopters initially (even though they passed the
>application process with flying colors).   Over the course of time, I
>stopped ignoring this intuition (or nagging thought) and started to
>pay more attention to it when placing a dog.

 You really hit it right on the head !!   I thought I was being selfish when I
felt like that. I felt like I was saying that my home was so much better than
the one they were about to get. I didn't realize that it was something that I
really needed to listen to. I didn't want to ruin the animals chances for a
"good" home by my suspicions. Now I know from experience and your post that I
need to listen more carefully.

         Thanks,
    Megon Sax
 Az Husky Rescue

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by rach.. » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Just an idea:  why not, in addition to everything else, send the cat or
dog to its new home with a blanket or towel what he or she has slept on
and that smells like his rescue home.  They are so sensitive to smell,
and it can really help in the stressful situation of moving into a 100%
new situation.  I do this when my cats stay at the vet's office and they
always settle in fast and with less stress.  Just an idea.

                Stop animal abuse. Start here.?

        http://www.geocities.com/Petsburgh/4433/index.html

               Soon to be www.GraciesSafeHarbor.com

If you have an animal welfare organization that needs a website,contact
us to set up and host your site at www.GraciesSafeHarbor.

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Lisa Ocho » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have a question for the group..........

> I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed two
> dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
> scenario?

> 1)  Hound mix puppy ....  Maggie came back.  She had been with them 48 hours.

> 2)  I placed a DLH kitten (14 weeks)  ... Less than 20 hours in her home and since
> he was not completely "at home" she wanted to bring him back.  Fine with me.

> 3)  A Jack Russel - ...  They have had her for *3* days when they call
> and say that their first dog still isn't accepting her and she has to go.

> I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this far - I
> guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
> go about this differently in the future.

Wow, Robin, this is TERRIBLY bad luck!

I don't have much trouble with dogs being returned (in fact, knock wood,
it's been quite a number of years since I've had it happen).  Here's how
I handle matching dogs and adopters:

I have a pretty extensive application, with a lot of open-ended
questions on it ("what do you think is the perfect BC" "What did you
like best about your last dog?  What was your biggest problem?" etc.)
The answers to these questions tells me a LOT about the adopters (it's
amazing how inappropriate people will give themselves away if you just
get them to write down a sentence or two, and also amazing how the
appropriate people always rise to the top of the heap, even if their
living situations aren't perfect).  Another nice thing about a lengthy
application is that if someone cares enough to fill out the whole thing,
the chances are pretty good that they're serious about adopting a dog.

In addition to the name and phone number of their vet, I also ask for
the names/phone numbers/email addresses of three dog-owning friends.
The primary question I ask these people is, "would you want YOUR dog to
live with <potential adopter>?"  but I also ask about the adopter's
living situation (size of yard, fence, stuff like that) and then compare
it to what the adopter has told me.  I've tossed out several people
whose applications were falsified to look better (for example, the woman
who told me she had a big yard with a 4-foot chain link fence; ALL of
her references stated that she lived in a 4th-floor apartment), which
saves me time and money since I don't have to actually travel to find
out the potential adopter is lying to me.

If all looks good so far, I then have a phone conversation with the
adopters (at their expense), using the application to decide what
questions they should be asked.  I also describe at great length, EVERY
problem the dog I have to place has and every bad thing he/she has done,
and listen to the reaction to this.  If I get a good feeling about the
adopter at this stage, I go to the next step.

I then invite the potential adopters to visit me in person.  My feeling
is that a person who is willing to put forth the effort of driving,
sometimes for several hours, is probably pretty committed to adopting.
But they don't get to see the dog they're interested in till they've met
my dogs -- all at once =)  Their reactions to six or seven dogs leaping
all around them, saying hello, and bringing toys so that the guests will
play with them, tell me a LOT.  People who are more worried about
staying clean than throwing the tennis balls that are dropped all over
their feet are probably not good candidates as BC owners, people who
shrink back from the horde are probably not good candidates as dog
owners, people who show up in pastel-colored luxury vehicles are
probably not ready to live with a BC, people who show up in white linen
slacks after they've been told to wear old clothes are probably not
ready for a dog, etc.  I also get a chance to see how their children
react to dogs.  My Archie is one of the THE most child-tolerant dogs
I've ever known -- he will literally put up with ANYTHING, which makes
him a lot safer to test kids on than the foster dog.  If a child starts
getting too rough or wants to play inappropriately with Archie, I'll
give it about 3 seconds to see if the parents put a stop to the
behavior.  If they don't, they don't get a dog, and *I* put a stop to
it, in no uncertain terms.

I have found that this method works quite well for me.

--
Lisa Ochoa, Proprietor, Ochoa's House of Dog Toys
Home of Archie, CGC (8yo Doberman/Torpedo);
Oliver, CD, NA, FM, CGC, TDI, 1/3 CDX (TMWDITW - 9yo BC);
Nell, CGC (Gorgeous 8yo Lady Whippet);
Ripley, CD, FDCH, CGC (3yo BC Wonder Pup);
Luke, CGC (3yo BC Extraordinaire);

 "It takes brains to understand a smart remark, but none to be
   offended by it."   (Miss Know-It-All, BC Comic Strip, 1/27/99)

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Nancy E. Holmes or R. Nelson Ruffi » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Do you give a guestimate for the adjustment period - I usually tell people
within 3 weeks and say that of course if the match is good it can happen
much more quickly :-) you'd be amazed at how many people boast of the rapid
adjustment their new pet makes :-)
Nancy
Quote:

>I have a question for the group..........

>I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed
two
>dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
>scenario?

>1)  Hound mix puppy that I bottlefed from 4 days of age, she is now six
months
>old.  *Fully* housebroken - has not had an accident since she was 7 weeks
old.
>Crate trained, good with cats, *excellent* with children (I have twin two
year
>olds) and friendly to everyone, has basic obedience training.  Very bonded
to
>humans as she was a bottle baby....

>- I interviewed potential homes (you can be sure I was viligent - I am very
>attached to her) The best prospect was a family with two children (6/11) -
they
>drove for over an hour just to see her and it was love at first sight.
Maggie
>loves to fetch, and by the time they left to go home she was passing me by
to
>bring the toy back to the 11 YO boy.  Maggie *does* have a loud hound
voice,
>but only uses it when she wants in from outside (scratches at door to go
out)
>and since they were looking specifically for a hound as an inside only dog,
and
>they live in the country with a fenced yard, I figured it was a match made
in
>heaven.  They signed the contract and left.  I called the next morning
(monday)
>everything was fine.  Tuesday evening the mother called me and told me how
>wonderful she was, how friendly, how good with the children, how clean in
the
>house and then finished the conversation off with the fact that they
thought
>she was unhappy and they wanted to bring her back.  Fine with me, I love
the
>dog.  Maggie came back.  She had been with them 48 hours.

>2)  I placed a DLH kitten (14 weeks)  with a woman who was wanting a second
cat
>(indoor only)  The kitten was a little shy at first (she was wearing *lots*
of
>perfume) but she visited me for 1 1/2 hours and he warmed up considerably.
She
>took him home late Sunday afternoon and called me by lunchtime Monday
saying
>that he was hiding under her couch and hadn't eaten much.  Verdict?  He was
>unhappy and wanted to come back home - Less than 20 hours in her home and
since
>he was not completely "at home" she wanted to bring him back.  Fine with
me.

>3)  A Jack Russel - Now, I know you are rolling your eyes at this one, but
let
>me finish <g>......  I bought Susie for myself 8 months ago as a show
prospect.
> She is an absolutely *gorgeous* solid white rough with patch eyes and was
>dynamite in the ring.  She does have a high energy level, but is good with
>children (remember those 2 / 2 year olds?) and cats.  She is *** to
>other dogs and in fact the reason that I decided to rehome her is because
my
>dogs (I have Aust. Shep) think that Susie is LUNCH.  I have already had to
have
>her muzzle stitched where my Alpha *** grabbed her and the rest of them
just
>*want* her.  I finally decided that it was not fair to her to always have
to be
>separate.  And in truth, it is stressful to have to keep her separate in
our
>very busy household.

>I answered a post (from rec.dogs) for a couple in my area who wanted a
playmate
>for their dog.  Since Susie is *not* dog agressive, and the couple had a
small
>dog (reads something that wouldn't eat her) I emailed them and we discussed
at
>length her disposition, introducing her to their dog,  and making a smooth
>transition into their "family".  They have had her for *3* days when they
call
>and say that their first dog still isn't accepting her and she has to go.

>Now, I assure you that these animals are not unhealthy, untrained,
>unmanageable, etc. quite the opposite.  I have discussed with each person
what
>is involved with making a smooth transition into a new home (for animal and
>people alike) and have chosen the new homes carefully.   In the case of the
>JRT, the guy told me that they fully expected that the transition would
take a
>couple of weeks!  So I feel that I am asking the right questions, and
getting
>the right answers...........  How do you deal with adoptive owners that are
>unrealistic when demanding that if a pet does not acclimate fully within a
few
>hours that they never will??????

>I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this
far - I
>guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how
to
>go about this differently in the future.

>Thanks,

>Robin

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Gretel » Thu, 09 Sep 1999 04:00:00


I don't think you are doing anything wrong.  In fact, you are doing
something right.  At least they are feeling safe enough to return the
animal to you instead of doing something on the sly.

I have rescued and placed many dogs and cats over the years.   And, just a
few weeks ago I tried to adopt a dog who appeared to be perfect for me
from a rescue organization and took it back after two weeks of trying and
trying to make it work... and changed that dog for another dog the rescue
group had.  The second dog actually is perfect for me, although she has
cost me over five hundred dollars so far!  And I have only had her for
four days.

So I have been on both sides of the fence.  When I was adopting a dog, I
was looking for a friend for my tiny elderly mixed breed dog.   I found
that after two weeks of every sort of effort, the dog, even though tiny,
was an absolute wildman who was not suited for an apartment.  Although he
appeared calm and quiet when I first got him, that turned out to be
because he was ill!  Once the vet and I fixed him up, he felt GOOD... so
good that he drove my tiny dog completely crazy with his exuberant antics.

I took him back and traded him for an elderly female toy poodle.  She has
been very expensive because of problems with her teeth.  But she loves
lounging on the bed in my small apartment, cuddled up to my other dog.
Peace reigns. They are perfect for each other.

As for the happy and energetic little male dog, he is staying at a foster
home with a huge yard and lots of big country dogs to play with -- and a
dog door to the inside of the big air conditioned house.  

I usually place animals with friends, coworkers, or family members.  That
makes it very easy to find good matches.  When I was rescuing and placing
dogs and cats I had one cat returned and one dog returned to me after
many, many successes.  I also had one terrible experience when a dog I
placed was taken to the City Shelter and killed.  (The person adopting the
dog was one of my closest friends at that time in my life.  Needless to
say, she did not consult me first -- I found out when I went to make a
followup home visit less than a week after placing the dog.  Also needless
to say, we have not spoken to each other since that happened nearly twenty
years ago).  

The cat was just dumped back into my backyard because, after one night,
she still hid under the man's bed.  Her next family was much more
understanding.

The dog was adopted to a coworker.  He was returned to me after three or
four months when he suddenly had medical problems that the adopters could
not afford at the same time they were going through a divorce.  I took the
dog back and had him fixed up.   THEN they wanted the dog back.  No,
sorry.  I adopted him out to a member of my husband's family, where he is
still doing quite well...

Quote:

>> I have a question for the group..........

>> I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed two
>> dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
>> scenario?

>> 1)  Hound mix puppy ....  Maggie came back.  She had been with them 48 hours.

>> 2)  I placed a DLH kitten (14 weeks)  ... Less than 20 hours in her
home and since
>> he was not completely "at home" she wanted to bring him back.  Fine with me.

>> 3)  A Jack Russel - ...  They have had her for *3* days when they call
>> and say that their first dog still isn't accepting her and she has to go.

>> I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this
far - I
>> guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
>> go about this differently in the future.

--
Gretel Y.
 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Manade » Fri, 10 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Hey guys,

Thanks so much all for the good suggestions.  I appreciate all of you taking
the time to share your thoughts. :)

 I do private/breed rescue should the need arise. I used to volunteer with a
local group, but that only lasted a couple of years. (I thought show people
were bad about cliques and backstabbing!)  Because of my twins these were the
first rescues I have done in some time. I obviously have to be very careful
about what I foster. :)  

I have never had an animal returned before, so to have three in a row was
mindboggling.
I felt like I had interviewed the people at length and had asked all the right
questions, etc.  I think in the future I will let people come interview one day
and then require a waiting period of a week or so to make sure they are
serious.  I also like the idea of "overstating" the adjustment time.  Of
course, the JRT guy said that they fully expected it to take a couple of weeks,
and they gave it three whole days.  I guess though, that there is no fool proof
method, and we all do the best we can.

Thanks again for all the suggestions and support.

Robin

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Janet Gun » Fri, 10 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have a question for the group..........

> I do some private rescue (on the side :) and have recently rehomed/placed two
> dogs and a cat....my question is, how do you guys deal with the following
> scenario?

....
> I appreciate any input you may have - and I appreciate you reading this far - I
> guess it is as much a rant as anything else, but I really want to know how to
> go about this differently in the future.

Just a thought.  Sometimes one member of a couple is more enthusiastic
about the adoption, and the other is just "going along with it."
When the "*** hits the road" the situation is less rosy than
he/she had hoped, and he/she becomes less tolerant.

I am not sure how to screen for this- maybe talking to each relevant
family member separately, rather than letting the enthusiastic one
answer for "us".

This is one of the reasons I just foster, and let other people do the
initial home checks/screening, so I don't have to make "people
judgements."

Janet Gunn

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by BRDO » Fri, 10 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>I appreciate any input you may have - and I
>appreciate you reading this far - I guess it is as
>much a rant as anything else, but I really want
>to know how to go about this differently in the
>future.
>Thanks,
>Robin

Robin~

This happens to us all,and even when we really are doing great we have
self doubts.

A few things.

It is really good to have a story about you dog out there.
In the past I have made up flyers,and put ads in.
Some newspapers will do this for free.

This way even though you are advertising your beloved dog,you will get
people,and maybe that one out of 25 that reponds will be "perfect",huh?

Nowadays I have people wanting a dog,and have already past my Gestapo
questions, before I get a dog, pretty good huh?

Okay, so they call you and you can do a pretty good interview on the
phone.

Keep a paper handy so you can remember the questions to ask and their
responses.

I won't bore everyone with my questions, so if you'd like write me in
email and I will tell you them all.

So now you have someone you have chosen to come see your dog.

Make sure everyone in the entire family comes.

Do not let anything be too convenient,either.

You don't want any "spur of the moment" types,huh?

Okay so they come and you see how everyone interacts.

If they have other dogs, have them bring their dog alone too.

Have you application right there, so they can't think about what would
be the "correct answer"

You'd be surprised what answers you get if you ask things in a round
about way : )

So now lets say you think this is good.

Tell them you have another person to interview and why don't they go do
lunch or whatever, and call you in two hours.

This gives them time to think and change their minds.
A good thing really,as some people get embarrassed and can't
 say to your face they changed their minds,but a phone call is easier.

Okay so now they call back and everything is a go ahead.

I give them a bag of things, from some food, to water,cookies,a toy, to
a collar,ID and leash,to all the paper work and vet care,to a video,to a
scarf,and lot of helpful suggestions yadyada.

Okay I know this is overkill for most,but I have been doing this so long
it has worked and worked well.

Oh none of my dogs are free. There is always at least a $100 donation.

They sign a very good contract,and very binding.

Anyway, I tell them that they will have to give it a good month of
trials and tribulations, because NO dog is perfect,and I tell them all
the very negative tings that could and do happen.

I then tell them to call me anytime with any question or problem no
matter how insignificant.

That night I call them, As I do the next day, and then a few days later.

I'll say How is everything going?
They'll say great?
I'll say, no problems?
They'll say. NO

I'll then say WOW I have nevr adopted out a dog that there hasn't been
problems. This is a MIRACLE.

NOW they start apening up,as people do get embarassed by admitting that
there is a problem.

Then they tell me and we go from there.

I really believe that my adoptions work permanently because I am always
there for the people after the fact...

Anyway

Keep up the good work!

All Good Thoughts

Paulette~

A dogs life is too short...
    Their only fault really...

 
 
 

What am I doing wrong?????? (long)

Post by Nancy E. Holmes or R. Nelson Ruffi » Fri, 10 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Robin - during that waiting period I make the people read Super Puppy
(www.superpuppy.com) and warn them that I quiz when people come back to see
the dog again. That way I KNOW they have some commonsense knowledge of dog
behavior and training even if the dog is not a pup! And I DO quiz so people
actually study :-) now that is usually another good sign of commitment :-)
Nancy
Quote:

>Hey guys,

>Thanks so much all for the good suggestions.  I appreciate all of you
taking
>the time to share your thoughts. :)

> I do private/breed rescue should the need arise. I used to volunteer with
a
>local group, but that only lasted a couple of years. (I thought show people
>were bad about cliques and backstabbing!)  Because of my twins these were
the
>first rescues I have done in some time. I obviously have to be very careful
>about what I foster. :)

>I have never had an animal returned before, so to have three in a row was
>mindboggling.
>I felt like I had interviewed the people at length and had asked all the
right
>questions, etc.  I think in the future I will let people come interview one
day
>and then require a waiting period of a week or so to make sure they are
>serious.  I also like the idea of "overstating" the adjustment time.  Of
>course, the JRT guy said that they fully expected it to take a couple of
weeks,
>and they gave it three whole days.  I guess though, that there is no fool
proof
>method, and we all do the best we can.

>Thanks again for all the suggestions and support.

>Robin