help stop my dog from jumping up!

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help stop my dog from jumping up!

Post by doug cerc » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 07:38:35



Our new Italian Greyhound (11 months old) has a problem of jumping up on
every one, as he very excitable.  It has become a problem as he jumps up on
small children also.  He will bit onto our shirttails and such.  He will
also try to jump up to the counter and onto the coffee table.

Any suggestions to this problem would be appreciated.

Thnx

 
 
 

help stop my dog from jumping up!

Post by Mari » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 10:15:03


You're not alone--a lot of people have jumping dogs, and they can (and must)
be trained out of it.  What's been working for us:

Start with the ***s he lives with.  If he jumps up on you, or bites your
shirt-tails, ignore him--he does not exist.  Turn your back on him, or walk
away.  If you can't do that, then stand straight, cross your arms and look
up, away from the dog.  As soon as he backs off, with all four paws on the
ground, *lots* of praise.  Bend down to him so he doesn't feel the need to
jump up on you.  If you carry treats in your pocket (who doesn't :-)?) give
him a treat.  Make him think he's the greatest dog in the world.  If he gets
too e***d and begins jumping again, immediately turn off--ignore him
*completely* until all his paws are back on the ground, then *lots* of
praise again.  It didn't take Macula too long to figure out that jumping
wouldn't get her the attention she craved.  Don't get discouraged, this is
going to be an on-going routine for awhile:  even now Macula sometimes
forgets, but remembers really quickly when we turn away.  As your dog
improves, you can up the ante:  don't pay attention until the dog is
sitting.

Once you've taught this routine to your dog, teach it to other ***s who
come visit.  Our trainer even suggested setting-up greetings--getting
friends and neighbours to come to the door for the expressed purpose of
helping the dog learn how to greet people.  An important note:  during this
stage, and until your dog is reliable in his greetings, our trainer suggests
that the dog always be on a leash while greeting people.  It gives you more
control, and if the dog gets too e***d, you can step on the leash to keep
him down.

When he is reliable with ***s, ask children to help with his lessons.
Start with older kids, and *gradually* work down in age.  All of my nieces
and nephews, from the four-year-old up, know that they ignore Macula until
she is sitting.  Until the children (and you) feel comfortable with your
dog's ability to greet calmly, it is helpful if there is somewhere the dog
can be confined when people are coming and going.  Macula stays in the
family room, behind a babygate.  She can see the front door and hall, but it
allows people to enter the house without being accosted.  This gives the
young children more confidence, since it puts them in control of the
meeting--they approach the babygate and puppy as opposed to the puppy
approaching them.

Good luck, and keep us posted.

Marie


Quote:
> Our new Italian Greyhound (11 months old) has a problem of jumping up on
> every one, as he very excitable.  It has become a problem as he jumps up
on
> small children also.  He will bit onto our shirttails and such.  He will
> also try to jump up to the counter and onto the coffee table.

> Any suggestions to this problem would be appreciated.

> Thnx

 
 
 

help stop my dog from jumping up!

Post by Jerry How » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 13:23:58


Hello professor lying doc "scruff shake and scream NO in its face for 5
seconds" dermer,


Quote:
>  Below is an old post of mine that addresses this frequent question:

You know I've pretty well proven you to be a bag of hot foul wind...

Quote:
> Xref: uwm.edu rec.pets.dogs.behavior:213307


> >On Tue, 14 Dec 1999 15:45:12 -0000, "Eric Hayreh"

> >  I don't want dogs that jump all over people, but
> >>I am running out of ideas.
> >>Any thoughts
> >>Lucy
>   Dear Lucy,
>   Lauri suggested a punishment procedure for eliminating
>   the jumping that essentially amounted to holding the
>   dog's front paws up whenever the dog jumped.

That's typical of most of our regular poster's advice.

Quote:
>   I'm sure that such punishment can work. But why not
>   first try positive reinforcement to condition
>   constructive behavior before using punishment to
>   eliminate nuisance jumping?

An excellent suggestion, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>   Let us suppose that bits of food function as a reinforcer for your

dog.

You could end up teaching the dog to jump to get your Cheddar,
professor.

Quote:
>  Get a clicker, a cheap one can be found at children's stores,

You mean instead of saying "good boy" every time the dog looks at or
glances towards you briefly as it's taught in your FREE copy of my FREE
Wits' End Dog Training Method manual to condition the dog to look at
listen and thing of you every time you say good boy, professor scruff
shake?

Quote:
>  and click just before you offer your dog a small bit of food.

So every time he hears "click" he thinks CHEDDAR, instead of you?

Quote:
> Keep this up, until the dog starts orienting toward you whenever
>   he/she first hears the click.

You mean when he orients himself towards the Cheddar when he hears the
click and thinks Cheddar.

You mean instead of conditioning the dog to think of you every time you
say "good boy" cause he hears it every time he glances towards you?

Quote:
>   Now let us teach your dog to "down & stay" on command.

Why, professor? The objective was to break the dog of jumping on
everything from guests to counters, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>   Wait until your dog goes "down," and then immediately
>   click and treat (throw the treat a distance so your dog will have to

get up).

A bissle mazzle, professor scruff shake. HOWE is the down command going
to break the dog of jumping on the counters, professor scruffshake?

Time for a little shade tree shit kicking dog trainer dog training
information instead of your analytical behaviorism crap.

Quote:
>   Once your dog picks up the treat he/she will do plenty
>   of things but you just wait until he/she again goes down.

K.

Quote:
>   Once our dog is often going into the down position, you
>   can reinforce your dog for staying down for varying
>   durations. As you vary the durations introduce a release
>   command like "OK" before you click and treat.  If the
>   dog gets up before you say "OK" there is no click and no
>   treat. This is basically a discrimination training
>   procedure:

O.K. professor wind bag. The idea is train the dog for a few days to
down, is that correct professor scruff shake and scream NO in ITS face
for 5 seconds, professor? What if we wanted to reinforce our growling
puppy extra good for ten seconds professor? Would that be a good choice
like your gary wilcox delayed punishment that impressed you so? Or is
three seconds better for small handler aggression offenses, professor
doubletalker.

<snip skinin and grinnin>

Quote:
>    So far, you have taught the dog to go down and stay
>    down until you say "OK."

O.K. professor.

Quote:
>    Now you can teach the dog to go down on command.

Excellent, professor. HOWE long would that take, a couple days?

Quote:
>    Because of your previous training, your dog now often
>    downs.  Now introduce the command "down."

Instead of just training it in a few minutes as taught in your FREE copy
of my FREE Wits' End Dog Training Method manual?

<snip skinin and grinnin>

Quote:
>    Once your dog reliably downs on command you can return
>    to the first training procedure where he only goes up
>    when you say, "OK."

So, that's going to take about what, a week?

Quote:
>    When your dog's downing is well-contolled by saying
>    "Down," you can invite guests to your house and practice
>    the down command when the guests enter.

k.

Quote:
>    You can also practice the down command when you are some
>    distance from your dog, when your dog sees prey, etc.

k.

Quote:
>    Not only can you do this, but if you want the command to
>    well control your dog you should drill your dog with the
>    command. My dog loves these drills. I can even whisper
>    "down" when he is some distance from me, he downs, and
>    then he gets his "precious" treat (usually a piece
>    of buttered, dry rice cake or popcorn.)

An excellent choice of treat, professor. When you punish your dog's
behaviors and not your dog, what form of punishment does he like best,
professor double talker?

Quote:
>    I do this with my dog in all kinds of settings, when he
>    is in various positions, and distances from me. In
>    particular, I do this when prey is present.

Better start praying professor.

Quote:
>    Once the command "down" well controls downing, you can
>    phase out the click and treat, and just consequate the
>    behavior with some other reinforcer like verbal praise.

Like I do from the git go becasue the relationship is the most important
part of training and behavior, everything centers around that in my
poorly written plagerized book, professor. The one I offered you the
opportunity to edit being as you were so impressed with it.

Quote:
>    You can go on and do many things with clicker training.
>    For example, my dog looks left and right on command,
>    follows a target, hits a bell when he is disposed to
>    eliminate etc.

And you still need to punish behaviors, isn't that correct, professor
scruff shake? Excellent way to cause anxiety behaviors like masturbating
on your couch pillows. Wouldn't you agree, professor?

Quote:
>    You can discover more about clicker training by reading
>    the latest edition of Karen Pryor's _Don't Shoot the
>    Dog_, or read B. F. Skinner's article:

She killed her own kat because she couldn't train IT not to***in her
stove, professor.

Quote:
>    In mastering clickering training, you will have found a
>    general way of teaching your dog all sorts of
>    constructive behaviors that will enhance your dog's
>    bonding with you.

Will they be able to teach the dog not to jump on the counter and take
food, professor? HOWE you gonna do that, professor?

Quote:
>    Better living through behaviorism!

Your methods might work in a million years, professor. The dog will be
under too much pressure to break his command to down for weeks. My
methods break this behavior in a few minutes over a couple of days,
professor.

Quote:
>    --Marshall

HOWE come your little dog ***s on your couch, professor scruff
shake? Is it because you punish his behaviors, or is it alleloomimetic
behavior, professor?

Quote:
>                           Favorite Sources
> 1.  Overall, K. L. (1997). _Clinical behavi***medicine for small
>        animals._ St.Louis: Mosby

Yes, on of my favorite universities.

Quote:
>     Professor Overall has earned many degrees (MS, VMD, PhD) and is
>     certified by the Animal Behavior Society as an Applied Animal
>     Behaviorist.

Indeed. We discussed hole digging, remember professor? Your dr overall
doesn't have a training method to cure digging, professor. My methods
cure digging in a few minutes over a couple of days, professor.

She even has a probelm dog on our forum, Solo. Been in treatment for a
year with psychotropics and behavior modification with little
improvement. They taught melanie *** tactics to use on her shy dog
Solo and melanie refused to discuss it with us here.

Quote:
> 2.  Diane Blackman's Fun with Your Dog:

You mean our Master Of Deception by default when you lost the title to
your LYING title, professor. You remember lying about my FREE Wits' End
Dog Training Method manual, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>     Diane has compiled "tons" of information about dogs.

Her website tells us to cut poo in half lengthwise and fill it with taco
sauce to break coprophagia. My methods break coprophagia in a coupl of
minutes over a couple of days. You remember the discussion about it with
Paul and Marty when they were told they'd NEED to HURT their dogs MOORE
than they'd LIKE to break coprophagia? You remember Paul and Marty
didn't LIKE the idea of HURTING their dogs so they followed my
instructions and cured teh problem in a few minutes, professor. Your
Thug pals called them LIARS professor.

Quote:
> This work in progress reveals Diane's tremendous love and respect for

dogs.

Yes, blackman knits little cover ups for her pronged spiked pinch ***
collar and tells people shocking their dog is up to them if they're
comfortable with it, doesn't mention the DEAD DOGS we've entertained
here who've been made vicious from being shocked, and she beats he dog
in the face with a shepherd's crook to keep her untrained dog from
molesting sheep confined in a small round pen... that only occasionally
get bit, and don't seem to mind... She's jerked and choked her dog for
five years to make IT heel till she recently figured it out by reading
my manual... professor.  And she day boarded her dogs for months cause
they're not trustworthy at home.

Quote:
> 3. Prof.Mark Plonsky's Fabulous Site:

He's one of you school chums, isn't he? He's got all the shock collar
information on his site if you want to get the word from another dog
abusing Thug like yourself, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>     Mark's site has won numerous awards. It is VERY complete.

Yeah, there's lots of garbage there professor.

Quote:
> 4. Frequently Asked Questions

Another excellent ...

read more »

 
 
 

help stop my dog from jumping up!

Post by Mari » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 10:15:03


You're not alone--a lot of people have jumping dogs, and they can (and must)
be trained out of it.  What's been working for us:

Start with the ***s he lives with.  If he jumps up on you, or bites your
shirt-tails, ignore him--he does not exist.  Turn your back on him, or walk
away.  If you can't do that, then stand straight, cross your arms and look
up, away from the dog.  As soon as he backs off, with all four paws on the
ground, *lots* of praise.  Bend down to him so he doesn't feel the need to
jump up on you.  If you carry treats in your pocket (who doesn't :-)?) give
him a treat.  Make him think he's the greatest dog in the world.  If he gets
too e***d and begins jumping again, immediately turn off--ignore him
*completely* until all his paws are back on the ground, then *lots* of
praise again.  It didn't take Macula too long to figure out that jumping
wouldn't get her the attention she craved.  Don't get discouraged, this is
going to be an on-going routine for awhile:  even now Macula sometimes
forgets, but remembers really quickly when we turn away.  As your dog
improves, you can up the ante:  don't pay attention until the dog is
sitting.

Once you've taught this routine to your dog, teach it to other ***s who
come visit.  Our trainer even suggested setting-up greetings--getting
friends and neighbours to come to the door for the expressed purpose of
helping the dog learn how to greet people.  An important note:  during this
stage, and until your dog is reliable in his greetings, our trainer suggests
that the dog always be on a leash while greeting people.  It gives you more
control, and if the dog gets too e***d, you can step on the leash to keep
him down.

When he is reliable with ***s, ask children to help with his lessons.
Start with older kids, and *gradually* work down in age.  All of my nieces
and nephews, from the four-year-old up, know that they ignore Macula until
she is sitting.  Until the children (and you) feel comfortable with your
dog's ability to greet calmly, it is helpful if there is somewhere the dog
can be confined when people are coming and going.  Macula stays in the
family room, behind a babygate.  She can see the front door and hall, but it
allows people to enter the house without being accosted.  This gives the
young children more confidence, since it puts them in control of the
meeting--they approach the babygate and puppy as opposed to the puppy
approaching them.

Good luck, and keep us posted.

Marie


Quote:
> Our new Italian Greyhound (11 months old) has a problem of jumping up on
> every one, as he very excitable.  It has become a problem as he jumps up
on
> small children also.  He will bit onto our shirttails and such.  He will
> also try to jump up to the counter and onto the coffee table.

> Any suggestions to this problem would be appreciated.

> Thnx

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help stop my dog from jumping up!

Post by Jerry How » Wed, 02 Jan 2002 03:11:20


Hello professor lying doc "scruff shake and scream NO in its face for 5
seconds" dermer,


Quote:
>  Below is an old post of mine that addresses this frequent question:

You know I've pretty well proven you to be a bag of hot foul wind...

Quote:
> Xref: uwm.edu rec.pets.dogs.behavior:213307


> >On Tue, 14 Dec 1999 15:45:12 -0000, "Eric Hayreh"

> >  I don't want dogs that jump all over people, but
> >>I am running out of ideas.
> >>Any thoughts
> >>Lucy
>   Dear Lucy,
>   Lauri suggested a punishment procedure for eliminating
>   the jumping that essentially amounted to holding the
>   dog's front paws up whenever the dog jumped.

That's typical of most of our regular poster's advice.

Quote:
>   I'm sure that such punishment can work. But why not
>   first try positive reinforcement to condition
>   constructive behavior before using punishment to
>   eliminate nuisance jumping?

An excellent suggestion, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>   Let us suppose that bits of food function as a reinforcer for your
> dog.

You could end up teaching the dog to jump to get your Cheddar,
professor.

Quote:
>  Get a clicker, a cheap one can be found at children's stores,

You mean instead of saying "good boy" every time the dog looks at or
glances towards you briefly as it's taught in your FREE copy of my FREE
Wits' End Dog Training Method manual to condition the dog to look at
listen and thing of you every time you say good boy, professor scruff
shake?

Quote:
>  and click just before you offer your dog a small bit of food.

So every time he hears "click" he thinks CHEDDAR, instead of you?

Quote:
> Keep this up, until the dog starts orienting toward you whenever
>   he/she first hears the click.

You mean when he orients himself towards the Cheddar when he hears the
click and thinks Cheddar.

You mean instead of conditioning the dog to think of you every time you
say "good boy" cause he hears it every time he glances towards you?

Quote:
>   Now let us teach your dog to "down & stay" on command.

Why, professor? The objective was to break the dog of jumping on
everything from guests to counters, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>   Wait until your dog goes "down," and then immediately
>   click and treat (throw the treat a distance so your dog will have to
> get up).

A bissle mazzle, professor scruff shake. HOWE is the down command going
to break the dog of jumping on the counters, professor scruffshake?

Time for a little shade tree shit kicking dog trainer dog training
information instead of your analytical behaviorism crap.

Quote:
>   Once your dog picks up the treat he/she will do plenty
>   of things but you just wait until he/she again goes down.

K.

Quote:
>   Once our dog is often going into the down position, you
>   can reinforce your dog for staying down for varying
>   durations. As you vary the durations introduce a release
>   command like "OK" before you click and treat.  If the
>   dog gets up before you say "OK" there is no click and no
>   treat. This is basically a discrimination training
>   procedure:

O.K. professor wind bag. The idea is train the dog for a few days to
down, is that correct professor scruff shake and scream NO in ITS face
for 5 seconds, professor? What if we wanted to reinforce our growling
puppy extra good for ten seconds professor? Would that be a good choice
like your gary wilcox delayed punishment that impressed you so? Or is
three seconds better for small handler aggression offenses, professor
doubletalker.

<snip skinin and grinnin>

Quote:
>    So far, you have taught the dog to go down and stay
>    down until you say "OK."

O.K. professor.

Quote:
>    Now you can teach the dog to go down on command.

Excellent, professor. HOWE long would that take, a couple days?

Quote:
>    Because of your previous training, your dog now often
>    downs.  Now introduce the command "down."

Instead of just training it in a few minutes as taught in your FREE copy
of my FREE Wits' End Dog Training Method manual?

<snip skinin and grinnin>

Quote:
>    Once your dog reliably downs on command you can return
>    to the first training procedure where he only goes up
>    when you say, "OK."

So, that's going to take about what, a week?

Quote:
>    When your dog's downing is well-contolled by saying
>    "Down," you can invite guests to your house and practice
>    the down command when the guests enter.

k.

Quote:
>    You can also practice the down command when you are some
>    distance from your dog, when your dog sees prey, etc.

k.

Quote:
>    Not only can you do this, but if you want the command to
>    well control your dog you should drill your dog with the
>    command. My dog loves these drills. I can even whisper
>    "down" when he is some distance from me, he downs, and
>    then he gets his "precious" treat (usually a piece
>    of buttered, dry rice cake or popcorn.)

An excellent choice of treat, professor. When you punish your dog's
behaviors and not your dog, what form of punishment does he like best,
professor double talker?

Quote:
>    I do this with my dog in all kinds of settings, when he
>    is in various positions, and distances from me. In
>    particular, I do this when prey is present.

Better start praying professor.

Quote:
>    Once the command "down" well controls downing, you can
>    phase out the click and treat, and just consequate the
>    behavior with some other reinforcer like verbal praise.

Like I do from the git go becasue the relationship is the most important
part of training and behavior, everything centers around that in my
poorly written plagerized book, professor. The one I offered you the
opportunity to edit being as you were so impressed with it.

Quote:
>    You can go on and do many things with clicker training.
>    For example, my dog looks left and right on command,
>    follows a target, hits a bell when he is disposed to
>    eliminate etc.

And you still need to punish behaviors, isn't that correct, professor
scruff shake? Excellent way to cause anxiety behaviors like masturbating
on your couch pillows. Wouldn't you agree, professor?

Quote:
>    You can discover more about clicker training by reading
>    the latest edition of Karen Pryor's _Don't Shoot the
>    Dog_, or read B. F. Skinner's article:

She killed her own kat because she couldn't train IT not to***in her
stove, professor.

Quote:
>    In mastering clickering training, you will have found a
>    general way of teaching your dog all sorts of
>    constructive behaviors that will enhance your dog's
>    bonding with you.

Will they be able to teach the dog not to jump on the counter and take
food, professor? HOWE you gonna do that, professor?

Quote:
>    Better living through behaviorism!

Your methods might work in a million years, professor. The dog will be
under too much pressure to break his command to down for weeks. My
methods break this behavior in a few minutes over a couple of days,
professor.

Quote:
>    --Marshall

HOWE come your little dog ***s on your couch, professor scruff
shake? Is it because you punish his behaviors, or is it alleloomimetic
behavior, professor?

Quote:
>                           Favorite Sources
> 1.  Overall, K. L. (1997). _Clinical behavi***medicine for small
>        animals._ St.Louis: Mosby

Yes, on of my favorite universities.

Quote:
>     Professor Overall has earned many degrees (MS, VMD, PhD) and is
>     certified by the Animal Behavior Society as an Applied Animal
>     Behaviorist.

Indeed. We discussed hole digging, remember professor? Your dr overall
doesn't have a training method to cure digging, professor. My methods
cure digging in a few minutes over a couple of days, professor.

She even has a probelm dog on our forum, Solo. Been in treatment for a
year with psychotropics and behavior modification with little
improvement. They taught melanie *** tactics to use on her shy dog
Solo and melanie refused to discuss it with us here.

Quote:
> 2.  Diane Blackman's Fun with Your Dog:

You mean our Master Of Deception by default when you lost the title to
your LYING title, professor. You remember lying about my FREE Wits' End
Dog Training Method manual, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>     Diane has compiled "tons" of information about dogs.

Her website tells us to cut poo in half lengthwise and fill it with taco
sauce to break coprophagia. My methods break coprophagia in a coupl of
minutes over a couple of days. You remember the discussion about it with
Paul and Marty when they were told they'd NEED to HURT their dogs MOORE
than they'd LIKE to break coprophagia? You remember Paul and Marty
didn't LIKE the idea of HURTING their dogs so they followed my
instructions and cured teh problem in a few minutes, professor. Your
Thug pals called them LIARS professor.

Quote:
> This work in progress reveals Diane's tremendous love and respect for

dogs.

Yes, blackman knits little cover ups for her pronged spiked pinch ***
collar and tells people shocking their dog is up to them if they're
comfortable with it, doesn't mention the DEAD DOGS we've entertained
here who've been made vicious from being shocked, and she beats he dog
in the face with a shepherd's crook to keep her untrained dog from
molesting sheep confined in a small round pen... that only occasionally
get bit, and don't seem to mind... She's jerked and choked her dog for
five years to make IT heel till she recently figured it out by reading
my manual... professor.  And she day boarded her dogs for months cause
they're not trustworthy at home.

Quote:
> 3. Prof.Mark Plonsky's Fabulous Site:

He's one of you school chums, isn't he? He's got all the shock collar
information on his site if you want to get the word from another dog
abusing Thug like yourself, professor scruff shake.

Quote:
>     Mark's site has won numerous awards. It is VERY complete.

Yeah, there's lots of garbage there professor.

Quote:
> 4. Frequently Asked Questions

Another ...

read more »