Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

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Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

Post by Jason J. Bittn » Wed, 29 Jun 1994 07:33:42



Fergus, our ten week old mini dachschund, seems to have developed a really
*** biting problem.  He won't bite strangers, but he nips very hard at
us, not while he's playing or anything.  We have scolded him by yelling,
growling, and everything else short of slapping him...  Any one have any
suggestions as to how we can get him to stop biting???

Oh, and thanks Dena for all of the info.....     Jason

 
 
 

Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

Post by Dena Delga » Wed, 29 Jun 1994 20:03:15



Quote:
>Subject: Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

>Date: Mon, 27 Jun 94 22:33:42 EDT
>Fergus, our ten week old mini dachschund, seems to have developed a really
>*** biting problem.  He won't bite strangers, but he nips very hard at
>us, not while he's playing or anything.  We have scolded him by yelling,
>growling, and everything else short of slapping him...  Any one have any
>suggestions as to how we can get him to stop biting???

>Oh, and thanks Dena for all of the info.....     Jason

====================================================================
Hi Jason,

You're welcome.  Sorry to hear about this biting problem. This is normal puppy
behavior at this age.   These are what I have done to stop a dachsie puppy
from getting too mouthy (biting):

1) The Ouch Method - when the puppy puts his teeth on you anywhere, yell
    "OUCH!!" really loud and remove the body part from his reach.  Give him an
    acceptable substitute such as rawhide chew, cow hoof, squeeky toy, stuffed
    toy (Vermont Chewman).  And praise him like crazy for accepting the toy.

2) The Timeout Method - If he persists in going after your body parts,
    even after substitutes are offered, then confine him to his crate or x-pen
    for 10-15 minutes, and ignore him.  A puppy's biting can be a bid for
    attention.  You do not want to encourage him to ask for attention this
    way, so a "timeout" is his reward for bad behavior.  Ignore whines and
    cries and only let him out when he is quiet.  And praise him for being
    quiet.

3) The Scruff Shake - This is how his mother would correct him for biting or
    annoying her to teach him to stop.  You grab him by the scruff of the
    neck, behind the ears, lift his front feet slightly off the floor, and
    shake him gently for 2-3 seconds and yell "NO! NO BITE!!".  Repeat if
    necessary, then confine him for a 10 minute "timeout" in his crate.

Do not hit your puppy.  A scruff shake should be the harshest correction you
give, together with a timeout.  Believe it or not, the "timeout" will bother
him the most.  A puppy does not like to be isolated from his pack.  It will
not take too long for him to associate biting with getting him confined alone
as a reward.

In my house, all I have to say to any dog who is doing inappropriate behavior
is "Go to your room! Now!".  They know this means "timeout" and the offender
goes to his/her crate and stays there until I say it is OK to come out.  I
don't need to shut the crate door anymore.  I talk to my dachsies like they
are children.  Clear, simple sentences and commands.

I hope I was of some assistance.

Dena Delgado (a.k.a. the dachshund lady) :-)

 
 
 

Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

Post by Dave Weinste » Thu, 30 Jun 1994 02:49:21



: Fergus, our ten week old mini dachschund, seems to have developed a really
: *** biting problem.  He won't bite strangers, but he nips very hard at
: us, not while he's playing or anything.  We have scolded him by yelling,
: growling, and everything else short of slapping him...  Any one have any
: suggestions as to how we can get him to stop biting???

The trick I've used with dogs (including our mini-dachshund) is to take
the thumb and forefinger, with one in the mouth and the other on top
of the muzzle. Losely (key word) grip the top of the muzzle (from inside
and out) about midway back.

Don't pinch them. They shouldn't be hurt by this, it is just to get
across the idea that if you bite fingers they bite back. :-)

Seems to have done the trick...

--Dave
--

"We'll serve anyone, meaning anyone, and to anyone, at all!"
               N. Lovett, S. Todd

 
 
 

Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

Post by Michelle Cais » Thu, 30 Jun 1994 08:14:58



: : Fergus, our ten week old mini dachschund, seems to have developed a really
: : *** biting problem.  He won't bite strangers, but he nips very hard at
: : us, not while he's playing or anything.  We have scolded him by yelling,
: : growling, and everything else short of slapping him...  Any one have any
: : suggestions as to how we can get him to stop biting???
: The trick I've used with dogs (including our mini-dachshund) is to take
: the thumb and forefinger, with one in the mouth and the other on top
: of the muzzle. Losely (key word) grip the top of the muzzle (from inside
: and out) about midway back.
: Don't pinch them. They shouldn't be hurt by this, it is just to get
: across the idea that if you bite fingers they bite back. :-)
: Seems to have done the trick...
: --Dave

This worked very well for me too!!
-- Michelle

 
 
 

Mini Dachschund chewing on fingers

Post by michelson,stev » Thu, 30 Jun 1994 21:56:21




Quote:
>Fergus, our ten week old mini dachschund, seems to have developed a really
>*** biting problem.  He won't bite strangers, but he nips very hard at
>us, not while he's playing or anything.  We have scolded him by yelling,
>growling, and everything else short of slapping him...  Any one have any
>suggestions as to how we can get him to stop biting???

It sounds like you're doing the right things. Letting out a loud "ouch"
(overdoing it) can also help. Also, squeezing down under his tongue enough
to make it uncomfortable for him to bite you can also help. (Not hard enough
to hurt him - just to make it uncomfortable for him to have your finger in
his mouth.)

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