A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

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A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Scritt » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00



I think there are as mnay good dogs in the pound if only people took the
time. I think this is a business and promotes further unwanted breeding.
There are no bad dogs: only bad owners. This is not cheapp. Wonder who
pays? - Michelle

Wednesday, January 14, 1998
http://www.moonsgarden.com/
The LA Times

By DAIL WILLIS, The Baltimore Sun

GRANITE, Md.--The movement is so fast, it's a blur of fur and ferocity:
Seeing his handler attacked in a training exercise, the 90-pound German
shepherd is out of the patrol car's open window and on the attacker
instantly, teeth locked high on his arm.

One sharp word in Czech--"Sadni!"--from handler John Carhart, and the
fight is over. The dog sits, the growling and snarling stop, and no
leash or choke-chain is needed to enforce the command.

Meet Ajax, a recent graduate of the Maryland State Police K-9 training
school--and one of the Czech-born, German-schooled dogs that Maryland
troopers say are the future in police dogs.

The agency's move to European dogs, prompted by their size, strength and
obedience, mirrors a national trend. Skip Brewster, secretary of the
U.S. Police Canine Assn., estimates that half of the nation's 10,000
police dogs are now European transplants.

"There are still a few good dogs and breeders here in the United
States," says Brewster, a Detroit police officer and dog trainer. "But
there seem to be less problems with the European dogs."

"The dogs we were used to were extremely aggressive. They were trained
by the handler and no one else could go near them," says Sgt. James Hock
of the Maryland State Police Special Operations Division, which includes
K-9. "These [European] dogs are social--you can pet them."

The agency has acquired nine German shepherds since 1993, most of them
from the Czech Republic.

The dogs are not cheap--each costs from $2,900 to $3,500, depending on
the amount of training they've had. But troopers say the investment pays
off because of the dogs' superior training and breeding, unlike the
"gator on a leash" of yore.

"The Americans have diluted the ***lines of the German shepherd," says
Cpl. W. D. Baker, who supervises canine training for the Maryland State
Police at the agency's dog academy in Granite. "You can't find a good
German shepherd here anymore."

The European dogs are bigger and stronger, Baker says, giving them the
endurance and ability to withstand the stress of police work over the
eight to 10 years each dog is expected to serve.

"It's like the difference between a truck and a car," Baker says,
comparing the European and American dogs. "The key word is genetics."

As handlers take Ajax, Celo and Bocho through a series of training
exercises, what is most remarkable is the dogs' obedience.

The Czech word for attack--"Zadrz!"--gets the dogs jumping, growling and
biting in an impressive display of force. The command to
sit--"Sadni!"--and they are quiet within moments. Another
command--"Lahni!"--and they lie down, immobile but alert--a posture they
maintain despite balls being thrown, shots fired, other dogs passing by.

Handlers always address the dogs in Czech, the language in which they
were first trained--with one exception. "Good boy!" seems to have broken
the canine language barrier, setting tails wagging whenever it's spoken.
With these dogs, it's spoken a lot.

The training can take from eight to 18 weeks, depending on the dog's
level of expertise coming in, says Baker. All K-9 dogs also come back to
Baker's training yard for monthly "maintenance" to keep their skills
sharp.

A "purchased dog"--the designation troopers use to distinguish the
European dogs they are buying from dogs acquired through the more
traditional route of donation--arrives in this country with considerable
training already under its collar.

In Europe, breeders train the dogs from puppyhood on, frequently in the
discipline called schutzhund, the German word for "protection."

The police agency buys its imported dogs from a Maryland kennel when
they are 15 to 20 months old, then trains them for patrol work:
tracking, attacking, searching buildings.

Baker says male dogs are used for patrols because they are bigger,
stronger and more aggressive than females. For other kinds of police
work, both genders and a variety of dogs are used. Labradors and golden
retrievers are trained to sniff out bombs, explosives and ***;
***hounds remain the best tracking dogs.

                      Copyright Los Angeles Times

--
Kevin Traster and Michelle Lee
Pen, Paper & Mouse, Ink.

A detailed description of our services and pricing can be found at
http://www.moonsgarden.com/

"In Singapore, they have their condo, their car, their cards and cash:
in the process, they lost their courtesy, their character, their
conscience and their cats." - Scritto
For information on a free web site, click on http://www.moonsgarden.com/

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by J1Bo » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Michelle -

This article appeared in the local paper a month or so ago.    The state
troopers were looking for mentally sound dogs, and have had trouble finidng
them from US breeders.  While I don't dispute that there are a lot of badly
bred shepherds out there, and a sound dog is needed for this work, it IS
interesting to note that the Baltimore City police department has acquired
several "surrendered" german shepherds - purebred, but pedigree unknown, from
the shelter I work with.  If they've been successfull with "second-hand" dogs
being mentally stable, you would think that the state troopers might as well?

-Janet

Quote:

>I think there are as mnay good dogs in the pound if only people took the
>time. I think this is a business and promotes further unwanted breeding.
>There are no bad dogs: only bad owners. This is not cheapp. Wonder who
>pays? - Michelle

>Wednesday, January 14, 1998
>http://www.latimes.com/HOME/NEWS/LIFE/t000004036.html
>The LA Times

>By DAIL WILLIS, The Baltimore Sun

>GRANITE, Md.--The movement is so fast, it's a blur of fur and ferocity:
>Seeing his handler attacked in a training exercise, the 90-pound German
>shepherd is out of the patrol car's open window and on the attacker
>instantly, teeth locked high on his arm.

<snip - more stuff about importing european dogs for police work>
Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"

"If you think posters misunderstand your posts and jump to conclusions, re-read
before you post a message, and make sure you have been clear and complete with
your information."

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by stevi » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00


and incredible health improvement. ask me about my dog, Willie

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Scritt » Thu, 15 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Michelle -

> This article appeared in the local paper a month or so ago.    The state

Haha! I guess the LA Time sisn't so up-to-date!?

Quote:
> troopers were looking for mentally sound dogs, and have had trouble finidng
> them from US breeders.  While I don't dispute that there are a lot of badly
> bred shepherds out there, and a sound dog is needed for this work, it IS
> interesting to note that the Baltimore City police department has acquired
> several "surrendered" german shepherds - purebred, but pedigree unknown, from
> the shelter I work with.  If they've been successfull with "second-hand" dogs
> being mentally stable, you would think that the state troopers might as well?

> -Janet

I think in Texas somewhere they adopt mutts (mix-breeds) for police
work. You know
my views about "purity of breed" - I just think it's sad that people
always seem
more willing to spend money then they are time to make sure they get
want they want
out of a dog. Oh, well ... that's bureaucracy for you! - Michelle

Quote:
> >I think there are as mnay good dogs in the pound if only people took the
> >time. I think this is a business and promotes further unwanted breeding.
> >There are no bad dogs: only bad owners. This is not cheapp. Wonder who
> >pays? - Michelle

> >Wednesday, January 14, 1998
> >http://www.latimes.com/HOME/NEWS/LIFE/t000004036.html
> >The LA Times

> >By DAIL WILLIS, The Baltimore Sun

> >GRANITE, Md.--The movement is so fast, it's a blur of fur and ferocity:
> >Seeing his handler attacked in a training exercise, the 90-pound German
> >shepherd is out of the patrol car's open window and on the attacker
> >instantly, teeth locked high on his arm.

> <snip - more stuff about importing european dogs for police work>
> Janet Boss
> Best Friends Dog Obedience
> "Nice Manners for the Family Pet"

> "If you think posters misunderstand your posts and jump to conclusions, re-read
> before you post a message, and make sure you have been clear and complete with
> your information."

--
Kevin Traster and Michelle Lee
Pen, Paper & Mouse, Ink.

A detailed description of our services and pricing can be found at
http://scritto.com

"In Singapore, they have their condo, their car, their cards and cash:
in the
process, they lost their courtesy, their character, their conscience and
their
cats." - Scritto
For information on a free web site, click on http://singaporestrays.com

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Kadi » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


This article isn't talking about an untrained dog, and that is why the dogs
aren't cheap.  Yes, the could go to the pound and probably find dogs with
the mental stability and drive to do the job as a patrol dog.  Then what?
Many police departments aren't equipped with the knowledge or equipment
neccessary to train their own dogs, not to mention the knowledge needed to
even pick the most likey candidates from the pound.  The ones that are do
take "donated dogs", which come from a variety of sources such as private
parties, humane societies, rescues, etc.
As a side note, I haven't checked the pound for police dog candidates (but
I used to for protection dog candidates for a program I worked with), but I
would be surprised if more than 1 out of 100 "pound puppies" was a good
candidate because of age, health, background, lack of drive, stability,
etc, and of those probably less than half would actually graduate.
As for the concern about the $$'s spent, $2,900 to $3,500 for a trained
patrol dog is a very reasonable price.  By the time I get a pup or young
dog, raise it (food, medical, housing, etc), train it, certify it, etc I
would have at least this much money into the dog.  Assuming it actually
panned out and grew up to be the quality needed to be a patrol dog.
Finally, this article is about patrol dogs, dogs used to apprehend
suspects.  If you start talking about drug dogs, that is a different story.
 Any dog with high enough drives, stability, etc will work.  You don't have
to worry about the dogs size, in many cases smaller dogs would be better,
they can fit in more places.  You are going to find a lot more nartotics
dog candidates at the pound than patrol dog candidates.

Kadi



Quote:
> I think there are as mnay good dogs in the pound if only people took the
> time. I think this is a business and promotes further unwanted breeding.
> There are no bad dogs: only bad owners. This is not cheapp. Wonder who
> pays? - Michelle
> The dogs are not cheap--each costs from $2,900 to $3,500, depending on
> the amount of training they've had. But troopers say the investment pays
> off because of the dogs' superior training and breeding, unlike the
> "gator on a leash" of yore.
> A "purchased dog"--the designation troopers use to distinguish the
> European dogs they are buying from dogs acquired through the more
> traditional route of donation--arrives in this country with considerable
> training already under its collar.

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Scritt » Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> This article isn't talking about an untrained dog, and that is why the dogs
> aren't cheap.  Yes, the could go to the pound and probably find dogs with
> the mental stability and drive to do the job as a patrol dog.  Then what?
> Many police departments aren't equipped with the knowledge or equipment
> neccessary to train their own dogs, not to mention the knowledge needed to
> even pick the most likey candidates from the pound.  The ones that are do

You snipped the part about where the dogs are trained in the article. The dogs
are bought from Europe and trained in the US.

Quote:
> take "donated dogs", which come from a variety of sources such as private
> parties, humane societies, rescues, etc.

As I noted in another post: Texas does this. I applaud their efforts.

Quote:
> As a side note, I haven't checked the pound for police dog candidates (but
> I used to for protection dog candidates for a program I worked with), but I
> would be surprised if more than 1 out of 100 "pound puppies" was a good
> candidate because of age, health, background, lack of drive, stability,
> etc, and of those probably less than half would actually graduate.

Wouldn't that be a nice surprise? Dogs don't give up on human beings ...

Quote:
> As for the concern about the $$'s spent, $2,900 to $3,500 for a trained
> patrol dog is a very reasonable price.  By the time I get a pup or young
> dog, raise it (food, medical, housing, etc), train it, certify it, etc I
> would have at least this much money into the dog.  Assuming it actually
> panned out and grew up to be the quality needed to be a patrol dog.

A price on anything cheapens it. I have never, and will never give money to
encourage breeding.

Quote:
> Finally, this article is about patrol dogs, dogs used to apprehend
> suspects.  If you start talking about drug dogs, that is a different story.
>  Any dog with high enough drives, stability, etc will work.  You don't have
> to worry about the dogs size, in many cases smaller dogs would be better,
> they can fit in more places.  You are going to find a lot more nartotics
> dog candidates at the pound than patrol dog candidates.

> Kadi

Fair enough. That's about the only point I can be neutral about - Michelle

Quote:


> > I think there are as mnay good dogs in the pound if only people took the
> > time. I think this is a business and promotes further unwanted breeding.
> > There are no bad dogs: only bad owners. This is not cheapp. Wonder who
> > pays? - Michelle

> > The dogs are not cheap--each costs from $2,900 to $3,500, depending on
> > the amount of training they've had. But troopers say the investment pays
> > off because of the dogs' superior training and breeding, unlike the
> > "gator on a leash" of yore.

> > A "purchased dog"--the designation troopers use to distinguish the
> > European dogs they are buying from dogs acquired through the more
> > traditional route of donation--arrives in this country with considerable
> > training already under its collar.

--
Kevin Traster and Michelle Lee
Pen, Paper & Mouse, Ink.

A detailed description of our services and pricing can be found at
http://scritto.com

"In Singapore, they have their condo, their car, their cards and cash: in the
process, they lost their courtesy, their character, their conscience and their
cats." - Scritto
For information on a free web site, click on http://singaporestrays.com

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Kadi » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
> You snipped the part about where the dogs are trained in the article. The
dogs
> are bought from Europe and trained in the US.

The part I snipped read:
The training can take from eight to 18 weeks, depending on the dog's
level of expertise coming in, says Baker. All K-9 dogs also come back to
Baker's training yard for monthly "maintenance" to keep their skills
sharp.

They are not taking an untrained dog and making it "street ready" in 8 - 18
weeks.  Any 8 week training course is nothing more than a course to train
the handler in how to work with the dog, and maybe do some modification or
"finish" training for the dog.  In 18 weeks, if they are working every
single day you could take a dog who is an exceptional candidate from "green
dog" to street ready.  Even then, the "green dog" has something, proper
socialization, tug work, introduction to the basics of protection, started
on obedience, etc. And it doesn't have a bunch of problems to overcome.

The article also said:
Meet Ajax, a recent graduate of the Maryland State Police K-9 training
school--and one of the Czech-born, German-schooled dogs that Maryland
troopers say are the future in police dogs.

These dogs are not bought in Europe and trained in the US, they are trained
in Europe, purchased there, then the handler is trained in the US, and the
dog recieves some more training that ranges from minor changes to more
scenario work and "finish work".  These are NOT completely untrained dogs.

Like I said, I worked with a program that protection trained dogs.  ALL our
dogs came from private citizen donations, the pound, or rescue.  We never
purchased a dog.  Many dogs washed out of the program.  Very few of the
dogs we got didn't have problems that had to be fixed prior to starting
their training.  The dogs that didn't tended to be the private donation
dogs, and many of those came from breeders who donated a pup that we were
able to raise properly.  The other dogs needed socialization, vet care
(lots of vet care), behaviour modification, etc.  By the time this was
done, and we were able to really work on the obedience and protection
training, you were talking at least 6 months and for some dogs almost a
year.  And this is just for basic protection work, bark on command and bite
if needed.  Nothing like the training a patrol dog needs.
As for the $$ end of things.  Nobody was paid, everyone was a volunteer.
The dogs that washed out were placed as pets whenever possible for a
nominal adoption fee, if they washed out because they weren't "fixable"
though, they were euthanized.  The dogs that graduated were placed in homes
(but still belonged to the program) for a donation of 2,500.  Yep, 2,500,
usually raised by the person through various fundraising, but sometimes
paid for "out of pocket".  And every year the program lost money, even with
private donations in addition to the "placement donation".  The program
eventually folded because the head person couldn't afford to keep dumping
money into each year.

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Scritt » Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:



> > You snipped the part about where the dogs are trained in the article. The
> dogs
> > are bought from Europe and trained in the US.

> The part I snipped read:
> The training can take from eight to 18 weeks, depending on the dog's
> level of expertise coming in, says Baker. All K-9 dogs also come back to
> Baker's training yard for monthly "maintenance" to keep their skills
> sharp.

> They are not taking an untrained dog and making it "street ready" in 8 - 18
> weeks.  Any 8 week training course is nothing more than a course to train
> the handler in how to work with the dog, and maybe do some modification or
> "finish" training for the dog.  In 18 weeks, if they are working every
> single day you could take a dog who is an exceptional candidate from "green
> dog" to street ready.  Even then, the "green dog" has something, proper
> socialization, tug work, introduction to the basics of protection, started
> on obedience, etc. And it doesn't have a bunch of problems to overcome.

> The article also said:
> Meet Ajax, a recent graduate of the Maryland State Police K-9 training
> school--and one of the Czech-born, German-schooled dogs that Maryland
> troopers say are the future in police dogs.

> These dogs are not bought in Europe and trained in the US, they are trained
> in Europe, purchased there, then the handler is trained in the US, and the
> dog recieves some more training that ranges from minor changes to more
> scenario work and "finish work".  These are NOT completely untrained dogs.

Fair enough: there no reason why all the training cannot be done in the US,
however. It would probably be cheaper to train Americans to train dogs than to
have Europeans train them first.

Quote:
> Like I said, I worked with a program that protection trained dogs.  ALL our
> dogs came from private citizen donations, the pound, or rescue.  We never
> purchased a dog.  Many dogs washed out of the program.  Very few of the
> dogs we got didn't have problems that had to be fixed prior to starting
> their training.  The dogs that didn't tended to be the private donation
> dogs, and many of those came from breeders who donated a pup that we were
> able to raise properly.  The other dogs needed socialization, vet care
> (lots of vet care), behaviour modification, etc.  By the time this was
> done, and we were able to really work on the obedience and protection
> training, you were talking at least 6 months and for some dogs almost a
> year.  And this is just for basic protection work, bark on command and bite
> if needed.  Nothing like the training a patrol dog needs.

Why are you writing like my comments about the article was directed at you? I
have no idea who you are and I've stated that I am aware that in Texas they do
take dogs from pounds. I wish they did that more often. If my comments don't
apply, why do you feel the need to explain yourself?

Quote:
> As for the $$ end of things.  Nobody was paid, everyone was a volunteer.
> The dogs that washed out were placed as pets whenever possible for a
> nominal adoption fee, if they washed out because they weren't "fixable"
> though, they were euthanized.  The dogs that graduated were placed in homes
> (but still belonged to the program) for a donation of 2,500.  Yep, 2,500,
> usually raised by the person through various fundraising, but sometimes
> paid for "out of pocket".  And every year the program lost money, even with
> private donations in addition to the "placement donation".  The program
> eventually folded because the head person couldn't afford to keep dumping
> money into each year.

It's sad when money becomes an issue in keeping a living creature alive. I have
no problem with your program: I do, however, wonder why you felt you needed to
do so much explaining in response to a newspaper article. - Michelle

--
Kevin Traster and Michelle Lee
Pen, Paper & Mouse, Ink.

A detailed description of our services and pricing can be found at
http://scritto.com

"In Singapore, they have their condo, their car, their cards and cash: in the
process, they lost their courtesy, their character, their conscience and their
cats." - Scritto
For information on a free web site, click on http://singaporestrays.com

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Chris Kosmak » Sun, 18 Jan 1998 04:00:00


:
: Fair enough: there no reason why all the training cannot be done in the US,
: however. It would probably be cheaper to train Americans to train dogs than to
: have Europeans train them first.

Actually, there are some good reasons.  Many of the imported dogs are
privately purchased by law enforcement officers rather than by the
agencies.  The vast majority of agencies have absolutely no budget for
K-9's or their training.  And skill is a harder commodity to come by
than money.  That's actually one of the biggest problems I have with
imported, pre-trained dogs:  I see too many with less than competent
handlers.

: Why are you writing like my comments about the article was directed at you? I
: have no idea who you are and I've stated that I am aware that in Texas they do
: take dogs from pounds. I wish they did that more often. If my comments don't
: apply, why do you feel the need to explain yourself?

I've appreciated Kadi's posts because I wasn't aware of any non-profit
protection training programs.  However, this same article was posted
here about 2 months ago and there was a fairly long discussion of it
at that time, with me making many of the same points that Kadi has been
making this time around.  The reaction is not to you or your comments
so much as it is to the misleading statements in the original article.

Lynn K.
--

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Terr » Sun, 18 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:


> :
> : Fair enough: there no reason why all the training cannot be done in the US,
> : however. It would probably be cheaper to train Americans to train dogs than to
> : have Europeans train them first.

> Actually, there are some good reasons.  Many of the imported dogs are
> privately purchased by law enforcement officers rather than by the
> agencies.  The vast majority of agencies have absolutely no budget for
> K-9's or their training.  And skill is a harder commodity to come by
> than money.  That's actually one of the biggest problems I have with
> imported, pre-trained dogs:  I see too many with less than competent
> handlers.

This is interesting. My breeder's GSD's almost always are purchased
by the Police Department, SAR, and other goverment agencies as pups,
and trained by the people in the department, whichever it is.
None purchase her dogs fully trained, they do it themselves.
And, these are AMERICAN bred dogs...:)

Quote:

> : Why are you writing like my comments about the article was directed at you? I
> : have no idea who you are and I've stated that I am aware that in Texas they do
> : take dogs from pounds. I wish they did that more often. If my comments don't
> : apply, why do you feel the need to explain yourself?

Well, it yet again appears as if you think no one can challenge or
debate
your "offerings" without having to explain the words "debate" or
information
exchange" to you.
You need to take a page out of your own book and realize that public
postings are here for public discussion. SOME of us LIKE hearing about
viewpoints that Kadi posted without taking offense. Why can't you?
It's always your way, or the highway. Get a grip. Life consists of
much more than living with 2 small(untrained) dogs in an apartment and
being
too broke to own a car.
You, however, still do not realize that, and what's worse, will
probably never understand that.
Terri
 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Jana » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
> It's sad when money becomes an issue in keeping a living creature > alive. I have no problem with your program: I do, however, wonder why > you felt you needed to do so much explaining in response to a > newspaper article. - Michelle

    The thing is, it isn't a matter of "keeping a living creature
alive", it's a matter of finding dogs that are suitable for a strenuous
job- mentally, physically, and behaviorally.   He said that the dogs who
"washed out" and still were suitable as pets were placed in homes.  I'm
guessing it was very few who were so ruined by past experiences, bad
health, etc that they actually had to be euthanized.

Jana

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Sam & Karen Smit » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>     The thing is, it isn't a matter of "keeping a living creature
> alive", it's a matter of finding dogs that are suitable for a strenuous
> job- mentally, physically, and behaviorally.   He said that the dogs who
> "washed out" and still were suitable as pets were placed in homes.  I'm
> guessing it was very few who were so ruined by past experiences, bad
> health, etc that they actually had to be euthanized.

> Jana

There are also a few who can't handle the aggression. They can't be trusted to stop and may turn on their handlers or attack a bystander.

Karen

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Chris Kosmak » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


:
: > : however. It would probably be cheaper to train Americans to train dogs t
: > Actually, there are some good reasons.  Many of the imported dogs are
: > privately purchased by law enforcement officers rather than by the
: > agencies.  

: This is interesting. My breeder's GSD's almost always are purchased
: by the Police Department, SAR, and other goverment agencies as pups,
: and trained by the people in the department, whichever it is.
: None purchase her dogs fully trained, they do it themselves.
: And, these are AMERICAN bred dogs...:)

Some law enforcement agencies are fully funded by tax dollars, others have
training programs of various levels, but the dogs are purchased by the
officers/handlers.  I don't know of any publicly funded SAR units.  Most
are unpaid volunteers with an administrative affiliation with a law
enforcement agency, OSHA or FEMA.

When there is a breeder in the area who produces good working dogs, word
of mouth causes other handlers to seek them out for pups.  My dog is
related to the GSDs in adjacent counties and I was with a bunch of GSDs
from another county on Sat. who were all from the same breeder.

What's funny is how different it is with ***hounds.  Breeders of other
breeds are more than eager to have dogs they've bred used in this kind
of work - a leading Beauceron breeder donated 2 dogs last year to the
SAR unit of San Diego County.  But many of the show ring ***hound
breeders won't allow their dogs to be sold to work in law enforcement.
Of course, they do have bullets and stuff like that to consider.

Lynn K.
--

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Kadi » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I'm not explaining in the sense you seem to think, ie defending what the
program I worked with did.  I'm explaining the pro's, con's and
considerations of trying to take "pound puppies" and turn them into dogs
who are trained similar to patrol dogs, but at a lower level.  You wanted
to know why people spend all the money instead of "saving a life", I'm
telling you some of the reasons.
I don't feel the need to justify this program (which is no longer
functioning, after almost 15 years they shut down due to lack of $$) or my
actions in relationship to it to anyone, including you.

Kadi



Quote:
> It's sad when money becomes an issue in keeping a living creature alive.
I have
> no problem with your program: I do, however, wonder why you felt you
needed to
> do so much explaining in response to a newspaper article. - Michelle

 
 
 

A Few Good Dogs: U.S. Police Agencies Turn to Europe for the Best K-9 Recruits

Post by Terr » Tue, 20 Jan 1998 04:00:00


snip

Quote:
> : This is interesting. My breeder's GSD's almost always are purchased
> : by the Police Department, SAR, and other goverment agencies as pups,
> : and trained by the people in the department, whichever it is.
> : None purchase her dogs fully trained, they do it themselves.
> : And, these are AMERICAN bred dogs...:)

> Some law enforcement agencies are fully funded by tax dollars, others have
> training programs of various levels, but the dogs are purchased by the
> officers/handlers.

Not enough clarifaction on my part..sorry.
The state is Oregon. (mostly the Portland area)

  I don't know of any publicly funded SAR units.

You are correct. The SAR dogs purchased are trained by volunteers.
 Most

Quote:
> are unpaid volunteers with an administrative affiliation with a law
> enforcement agency, OSHA or FEMA.

> When there is a breeder in the area who produces good working dogs, word
> of mouth causes other handlers to seek them out for pups.  My dog is
> related to the GSDs in adjacent counties and I was with a bunch of GSDs
> from another county on Sat. who were all from the same breeder.

Must have been a blast!

Quote:

> What's funny is how different it is with ***hounds.  Breeders of other
> breeds are more than eager to have dogs they've bred used in this kind
> of work - a leading Beauceron breeder donated 2 dogs last year to the
> SAR unit of San Diego County.  But many of the show ring ***hound
> breeders won't allow their dogs to be sold to work in law enforcement.
> Of course, they do have bullets and stuff like that to consider.

It is a bit weird.. The ***hound was meant for scent work..
I wonder was is causing this?
Terri