REALLY overweight dog

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REALLY overweight dog

Post by grace delcan » Fri, 19 May 1995 04:00:00



This is more of an owner.behavior problem then a dog.behavior
problem. My parents have a wonderful mutt named Grizzly who was
brought to them as a stray and never made it to the humane
society. They've had her for 10 years and although she wasn't
heavy at first, she started gaining weight after spaying. My
father would feed her leftovers, share his snacks, etc. in
addition to her regular dog food and now this dog that should
weigh about 25 lbs. is pushing 50 lbs. She can't really run and it
looks like even walking is uncomfortable. My dad insists he no
longer gives her people food and she eats a commercial "diet" dog
food. The vet has ruled out thyroid problems. Question #1: How can
Grizzly lose some weight? Question #2: Once a weight-loss plan has
been established, how can I can convince my dad to follow through?
He really loves her but finds it hard to cut back her food because
"she looks hungry". Please post or e-mail. Thank you.

Grace

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Sara Easl » Sat, 20 May 1995 04:00:00


[snip]

|> been established, how can I can convince my dad to follow through?
|> He really loves her but finds it hard to cut back her food because
|> "she looks hungry". Please post or e-mail. Thank you.

Unfortunately I do not have any advice but God, do I sympathize !!!!
My in-laws are exactly the same way. Last fall they put their 11-yo
obese German Shorthair to sleep due to congestive heart failure. Gee,
I wonder how that happened?!?!?

All I can say is that it's compulsive behavior on the part of the human.
Even seeing their dog put to sleep hasn't dissuaded them from overfeeding
the new pups they've gotten since. One thing that might help. I've not
said this to my in-laws to preserve family harmony, but you might try
pointing out to your dad that overfeeding the dog is fulfilling
your dads' needs at the expense of the dogs' health. It has nothing
to do with the dogs needs.

Good Luck,

Sara

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Elaine Marie Galleg » Mon, 22 May 1995 04:00:00


: This is more of an owner.behavior problem then a dog.behavior
: problem. My parents have a wonderful mutt named Grizzly who was
: brought to them as a stray and never made it to the humane
: society. They've had her for 10 years and although she wasn't
: heavy at first, she started gaining weight after spaying. My
: father would feed her leftovers, share his snacks, etc. in
: addition to her regular dog food and now this dog that should
: weigh about 25 lbs. is pushing 50 lbs. She can't really run and it
: looks like even walking is uncomfortable. My dad insists he no
: longer gives her people food and she eats a commercial "diet" dog
: food. The vet has ruled out thyroid problems. Question #1: How can
: Grizzly lose some weight? Question #2: Once a weight-loss plan has
: been established, how can I can convince my dad to follow through?
: He really loves her but finds it hard to cut back her food because
: "she looks hungry". Please post or e-mail. Thank you.

: Grace
                My dog was overweight when I got her.  Her previous owner
had her on a free feed program, plus doggie buscuits.  Her program here
is that she eats once a day in the evening.  She gets commercial dogfood,
usually, but also chicken and left overs.  I feel that a bit of variety
if fine.  She***s out all of my pans before I wash them. If I have a
pan with a lot of drippings, I just add a slightly reduced amount of her
regular dogfood in this pan.  She seems to enjoy this variety.
  The trick is to feed her just once a day, and then only the amount that
she will eat right away.  Occasionally, she won't be so hungry, and will
leave some dogfood in her dish overnight.  If there is still dogfood in
the dish the next day, I don't feed her that night.
  My dog's diet is relatively high in fat, I'd say.  The weight came
flying off of her however!  When she first came here, everyone commented
on how fat she was.  She's in TOP shape now!
  It's difficult to change household habits, but I'd tell your dad to
save her treats up in a covered dish that can stay in the 'fridge all
day.  They can then feed her any left overs in the evening.  She's a
small dog, so what I'd do is go ahead and give her the leftovers, but
hold back on the dogfood.  Save the dog food supplement for days when
there are no leftovers.

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Andrea D » Tue, 23 May 1995 04:00:00


HAH!  As the owner of an overweight (but not THAT overweight :) Golden,
I can sympathize.  Max has the most incredible range of starving looks
I've ever seen.  The trick is not to fall for them NO MATTER WHAT!
A great alternative treat are the little flavored rice cakes.  Max
loves 'em and there is no fat in them.

Here's his diet:

        1 quite large breakfast biscuit
        1 little Alpo Snap

        2 cups NutroMax Lamb&Rice Lite
        1 honey nut rice cake for dessert
        (Maybe 2 more rice cakes through the evening)

        1 Alpo Snap or peanut-butter flavored treat
          for doing his final "business" of the night :)

        Orange PTUI's (aka carrots) did NOT work at all :)

Exercise is quite key to the whole weight-loss process.  The dog
MUST be exercised in order to lose weight...walks are great for
this (especially given the age of your dad's dog).  He needs to
take it easy at first until the dog starts to lose some weight
and builds up its muscles a bit.

Due to Max's huge appetite and starvation looks and the resulting
weight gain, he has developed a heart murmur.  He's lost 5 pounds
so far, and the murmur is getting better.  You may want to mention
this to your dad...sometimes it takes a good scare to get humans
to make their dogs lose some weight (worked for me:).

Good luck and let us know how you make out.

/andrea & Max (now she tried to make me eat Green Trees!  PTUI!)

--
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REALLY overweight dog

Post by Eileen McDermo » Thu, 25 May 1995 04:00:00


I missed the original post altogether but I had/have a REALLY overweight
dog, too.  When I first got Hank he weighed about 72 pounds.  He should
weigh about half of that.  The first thing I did was change his diet.  I
weaned him away from moist dogfood and fed him dry food.  I switched him
from one brand of "semi-moist" dry food to a lower-fat hard dry brand.  I
give him vegetables as treats. (Broccoli is his favorite.)   I've limited
(but not totally cut out) the treats he gets. I take him out for a walk as
often as possible.  

I got Hank on April 14, 1994. Last spring, summer and fall,  I took him
out daily.  Our winter walks were much less reliable, since I live in a
colder climate and my vet suggested that it would be difficult to get a
dog to lose weight in the winter, anyway.  So... I settled for maintaining
his weight while it was still cold out.    He has begun to lose weight
again with the advent of spring.  His total loss so far has been almost 20
pounds.  I would like to see him take off another 10-15 pounds before this
is  all over.  I expect to see him at his "fighting weight" (just an
expression!) sometime in August. It's been kind of fun to see Hank turning
into "half the dog he used to be!"  I've been taking "fat pictures" to
document his weight loss.  When Hank is "finished,"  she wants to post
these pictures in the lobby of her office to encourage other "fat dog"
owners in their own "Operation Jenny Craig."

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by grace delcan » Fri, 26 May 1995 04:00:00


I posted "REALLY overweight dog" and I appreciate all the advice and
comments I have received. It's always good to know you're not alone...  
My parents (Grizzly's owners) and I have decided that she will come live
with myself and Scooter (and my husband) over the summer, where we know
her food intake and exercise will be controlled. Mom and I know dad will
*try* very hard for a week or two and then start sneaking Grizzly
treats. What to do when Grizzly goes back home? We'll deal with that
when the time comes.

Now I am wondering about the transition to her new home. Grizzly is very
attached to dad. Although I haven't lived with them for 5 years, Grizzly
obviously remembers me and looks like she's happy to see me. She's
visited my home and gets along with Scooter (Scooter wants to play,
Grizzly doesn't, Grizzly growls, Scooter whines and scampers off). How
do we make the transition as painless as possible for Grizzly? Would dad
visiting every other week make it worse? And I don't want Scooter to
feel left out. There's more to this doggy fat farm than diet dog food
and daily walks! Thank you again for all the advice!

Grace (feeling like Richard Simmons for dogs)

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Rachel Priebe » Fri, 26 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> HAH!  As the owner of an overweight (but not THAT overweight :) Golden,
> I can sympathize.  Max has the most incredible range of starving looks
> I've ever seen.  The trick is not to fall for them NO MATTER WHAT!

Murphy is the same, with the starving looks and perpetual***
around looking for food (and bit like her owner, at times :-)

I accidentally found out last year that when I fed her on rice and
vegetables, with only a tiny amount of dog food, she lost weight.
With rice and vegies she could have a decently-filled food dish, but
it didn't have much in the way of calories.  Unfortunately at the
time Murph was very thin and I was trying to fatten her up with these
great piles of rice!

Rachel                          (aka SUPERGOOF!)

                                        -  -
                                        O  O
                                          >
                                         \_/

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Rachel Priebe » Sat, 27 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> My parents (Grizzly's owners) and I have decided that she will come live
> with myself and Scooter (and my husband) over the summer, where we know
> her food intake and exercise will be controlled.
> Now I am wondering about the transition to her new home. Grizzly is very
> attached to dad. Although I haven't lived with them for 5 years, Grizzly

Is it possible for your dad to visit daily, maybe take Grizzly for a
walk each day.  I think it's a shame for them to be deprived of each
others' company.  I think your dad will miss Grizzly too.

Rachel
(maximum suckermom)

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by grace delcan » Sat, 27 May 1995 04:00:00


Unfortunately, I live 2 1/2 hours from my parent's house. I agree it's a
shame to separate Grizzly and my dad, but this is really a last resort
kind of thing. Grizzly has lost a little weight (5 lbs. or so) before
when my dad was being good and walking her regularly, but she's always
put it back on. The excess weight makes her inactive, the inactivity
causes excess weight, etc.

We're hoping to get her close to her "ideal" weight and then her old
bouncy, playful personality will return. And since she'll be more
active, it will be harder for her to put the weight back on. I hope.
Anyway, I've printed all the posts and e-mail about Grizzly and I'm
going to show them to dad. He then has all summer to miss her and think
about how much she means to him and maybe then he will be able to stop
himself from overfeeding her.

Again, I really appreciate the input. Any more advice for the fat, sweet
and probably sad dog that will be coming to live with me?

 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Moxies M » Thu, 01 Jun 1995 04:00:00


It's important to look at a little "doggie psychology" here.  Dogs are
scavengers.  They are conditioned as pack animals who scavenge for food
---- and when they find it, they will eat and eat and eat until they make
themselves sick.  This is what they MUST do to survive in the wild.  In
your house, things are a little different.  I think we all need to
recognize that there are other ways of rewarding our dogs besides with
foods they shouldn't have -- like an extra walk, a new toy, a game of tug,
or just some plain old affection from Mom or Dad.  (Kind of sounds like a
Jenny Craig lecture, doesn't it?)
 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Toby Fou » Sun, 04 Jun 1995 04:00:00




Quote:

>: This is more of an owner.behavior problem then a dog.behavior
>: problem. My parents have a wonderful mutt named Grizzly who was
>: brought to them as a stray and never made it to the humane
>: society. They've had her for 10 years and although she wasn't
>: heavy at first, she started gaining weight after spaying. My
>: father would feed her leftovers, share his snacks, etc. in
>: addition to her regular dog food and now this dog that should
>: weigh about 25 lbs. is pushing 50 lbs. She can't really run and it
>: looks like even walking is uncomfortable. My dad insists he no
>: longer gives her people food and she eats a commercial "diet" dog
>: food. The vet has ruled out thyroid problems. Question #1: How can
>: Grizzly lose some weight? Question #2: Once a weight-loss plan has
>: been established, how can I can convince my dad to follow through?
>: He really loves her but finds it hard to cut back her food because
>: "she looks hungry". Please post or e-mail. Thank you.

>: Grace
>                My dog was overweight when I got her.  Her previous
owner
>had her on a free feed program, plus doggie buscuits.  Her program
here
>is that she eats once a day in the evening.  She gets commercial
dogfood,
>usually, but also chicken and left overs.  I feel that a bit of
variety
>if fine.  She***s out all of my pans before I wash them. If I have
a
>pan with a lot of drippings, I just add a slightly reduced amount of
her
>regular dogfood in this pan.  She seems to enjoy this variety.
>  The trick is to feed her just once a day, and then only the amount
that
>she will eat right away.  Occasionally, she won't be so hungry, and
will
>leave some dogfood in her dish overnight.  If there is still dogfood
in
>the dish the next day, I don't feed her that night.
>  My dog's diet is relatively high in fat, I'd say.  The weight came
>flying off of her however!  When she first came here, everyone
commented
>on how fat she was.  She's in TOP shape now!
>  It's difficult to change household habits, but I'd tell your dad to
>save her treats up in a covered dish that can stay in the 'fridge all
>day.  They can then feed her any left overs in the evening.  She's a
>small dog, so what I'd do is go ahead and give her the leftovers, but
>hold back on the dogfood.  Save the dog food supplement for days when
>there are no leftovers.

Here's a thought--I had to put my Sheltie on a diet.  She weighed 18
pounds when I got her, and was 22 before long. I started to feed her
twice a day instead of once a day, and instead of one cup at night she
got 1/3 cup in the morning and 1/3 cup at night--and didn't seem to
know the difference.  I cut out the crispy chicken skin treats.  I
have tiny puppy biscuits which I snap in half for treats.  She is now
about 120--so it's been very successful.
        A fat dog is not a healthy dog so I hope you can succeed with
your canine diet regime!
 
 
 

REALLY overweight dog

Post by Ruth Eva » Sat, 10 Jun 1995 04:00:00


[snip]

Quote:
>Here's a thought--I had to put my Sheltie on a diet.  She weighed 18
>pounds when I got her, and was 22 before long. I started to feed her
>twice a day instead of once a day, and instead of one cup at night she
>got 1/3 cup in the morning and 1/3 cup at night--and didn't seem to
>know the difference.  I cut out the crispy chicken skin treats.  I
>have tiny puppy biscuits which I snap in half for treats.  She is now
>about 120--so it's been very successful.
>A fat dog is not a healthy dog so I hope you can succeed with
>your canine diet regime!

I sure hope that last number (120) was a typo!  :)

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