Harry and his Winter coat

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Harry and his Winter coat

Post by WGRB5 » Thu, 23 Oct 1997 04:00:00



My 4 year old 49 Lb.Lab/Chow will not grow a coat of heavy fur. He shivers and
 shivers. We have been feeding 2 1/2 cups of 21% GRAVY TRAIN and today at a
pet store they said not enough protein so I was give 26% protein CHUNKS by
The Iams company. Also has 15% fat and I was told feed 2 cups in the AM and
2 cups in the PM. I have ordered a 28 inch dog sweater but it's only in the
 50's

 
 
 

Harry and his Winter coat

Post by Elaine Gallego » Sun, 26 Oct 1997 04:00:00


 What you can try is to increase his excersize. This will raise his
metabolism, and might make him warmer.
 Also try to get some extra weight on him. This might be difficult if you
run him, but dogs can get up to 25% of their daily food intake in the form
of fat.
 I feed my dog all of our kitchen grease. This includes, sausage grease,
beef drippings, chicken fat.
 If you want to give that a shot, introduce a bit more fat in her food
daily. Be careful though...in case she doesn't take to it.

: My 4 year old 49 Lb.Lab/Chow will not grow a coat of heavy fur. He shivers and
:  shivers. We have been feeding 2 1/2 cups of 21% GRAVY TRAIN and today at a
: pet store they said not enough protein so I was give 26% protein CHUNKS by
: The Iams company. Also has 15% fat and I was told feed 2 cups in the AM and
: 2 cups in the PM. I have ordered a 28 inch dog sweater but it's only in the
:  50's

 What if we said the same thing about you? I do believe that you'd like to
mostly stay indoors, and have a nice thick parka when you went out. Take
an old human parka or coat, and re-cut it to fit your dog. If you're not
handy like that, call around and get a seamstress to do it.

--
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Elaine Gallegos

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Harry and his Winter coat

Post by Der schwarze Buccanee » Mon, 27 Oct 1997 03:00:00



Quote:
>  I feed my dog all of our kitchen grease. This includes, sausage grease,
> beef drippings, chicken fat.

        Not a great idea.  Excess fat in the diet has been linked to
pancreatitis, and, in some cases, even a single high fat intake event.

                                                -Scott Allen

        "At dawn we will face the greatest test of our resolve.  But I
say this: though starving, hunger will not weaken us; though diseased,
illness will not cripple us, and though weary, exhaustion will not claim
us.  We can fight knowing that all true Reiklanders will forevermore
honour our valiant gesture of defiance, even though our bodies be left to
feed the beasts of carrion.

        Mind you...we could always surrender."  -Rick Priestly's Siege    

 
 
 

Harry and his Winter coat

Post by Elaine Gallego » Tue, 28 Oct 1997 04:00:00




: >  I feed my dog all of our kitchen grease. This includes, sausage grease,
: > beef drippings, chicken fat.

:       Not a great idea.  Excess fat in the diet has been linked to
: pancreatitis, and, in some cases, even a single high fat intake event.

 Toy dogs are prone to pancreatitis, and should have fats restricted in
their diets. A toy dog will get plenty of fat from dog food, which is up
to 15% fat already.
 Some full sized dogs also have a delicate digestion, and can suffer from
pancreatitis.  I you wish to increase your pet's fat intake, go slowly,
experimenting with a bit more daily.
 Be forewarned- the dog has a very short digestive tract. A noticable
change in diet can result in occasional vomitting or diarrhea. Not that
this is any big deal...dogs puke all the time. I just wouldn't feed it a
pan of grease then turn it loose on my carpet. You think a regular "load"
is difficult to get up....
 My dog does fine with gobs of greasy pans, sausage, fatty meat cuttings,
and such. She is used to it though. Also, she sleeps on the patio, so if
feeling a bit whoopsy, I guess she makes a dash for the yard, cause it's
not a problem to me. She's always happy enough and ready to play, so I
guess it hasn't killed her yet.
 Of course if you just plain don't like the idea of slopping your pet with
a lot of heavy grease....don't do it.

:                                               -Scott Allen

:                                      
:       "At dawn we will face the greatest test of our resolve.  But I
: say this: though starving, hunger will not weaken us; though diseased,
: illness will not cripple us, and though weary, exhaustion will not claim
: us.  We can fight knowing that all true Reiklanders will forevermore
: honour our valiant gesture of defiance, even though our bodies be left to
: feed the beasts of carrion.

:       Mind you...we could always surrender."  -Rick Priestly's Siege    

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Elaine Gallegos

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Harry and his Winter coat

Post by Susan Lenna » Tue, 28 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> My 4 year old 49 Lb.Lab/Chow will not grow a coat of heavy fur. He shivers and
>  shivers. We have been feeding 2 1/2 cups of 21% GRAVY TRAIN and today at a
> pet store they said not enough protein so I was give 26% protein CHUNKS by
> The Iams company. Also has 15% fat and I was told feed 2 cups in the AM and
> 2 cups in the PM. I have ordered a 28 inch dog sweater but it's only in the
>  50's
> here now. What will we do when it gets in the 20's? Wayne R. Cole


Someone previously mentioned the possibility that this was due to
hypothyroidism. Intolerance to cold and shivering are classic symptoms
that affect many dogs. Additional things to watch for are lethargy,
dramatic weight loss or gain, and a noticeable dullness in personality.
Testing for thyroid function is relatively inexpensive and goes a long way
toward eliminating the existence of a condition that could prove deadly.
Certainly, I would request that your vet. perform the test if for no other
reason than 'peace of mind.'

There are other conditions that result in a sparsity the coat which
include hormonal changes (in both males and females).

Another possibility: Your dog has recently been through a relatively warm
summer during which he lost most of his coat. A period of cooler weather
is needed in order for your dog to grow sufficient coat to protect him
from extreme weather and if your dog is primarily a house-dog, the
interior temperature (heated through the fall season) of your home may
have prevented the appropriate density of coat; although 50 degrees is not
what I'd consider to be an extreme temperature. (Phew! Could that sentence
have been any longer;-))  It's a long-shot, but one worth considering.

As far as supplementing with kitchen grease: You're likely to exacerbate
the problems you already have. Not only is pancreatitis a real possibility
(in all breeds) but it's a condition which can lead to other problems,
including death. And, if you're lucky ;-(, there's a high probability that
your dog will suffer from a bout of explosive diarrhea. Your vet has
suggested a good, stable diet and I wouldn't suggest any form of
supplementation, particularly one that uses your dog as a 'grease
disposal', without his prior approval.

Remember that it will take some time for your dog to improve, whatever his
condition. However, if you don't notice a change (watch for new growth) in
a month , I would consider speaking with someone else; perhaps a
specialist.

Again: Check with your vet. and be certain to note all changes in your dog
while detailing any changes in your dog, or to his environment in the past
weeks or months. The more your vet. knows, the more apt he'll be at
rendering an accurate diagnosis.
Good luck!

Susan

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The "Complete Saint Bernard Dog" web page at:
 http://nbb.emory.edu/saint/

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