I am SOOOO Sick

Description of your first forum.

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by May » Thu, 20 Jul 2000 04:00:00




stitched with finest floss on pure irish linen:

Quote:
>Buddy, my 9 1/2 mo. male, netutered, lab mix pup has taken a bite out
>of my sofa and the armrest of one of my living room chairs.  I am just
>sick about it.  We've had him 4 months and in that time has not
>destroyed anything of that magnitude other than ocassional sock, shoes
>and underwear.

Labs do tend to be a bit ***(:> Think of him as a ***-ager- full of
energy; always on the go.  His brains won't come in the mail for a
good year or so.  Until he is completely reliable in the house,
confine him to a room that has been dog-proofed or confine him to a
crate while you are out.  That way, he will be unable to eat your
furniture.  Give him a stuffed Kong before you go out.  If you have to
be gone all day, see about having someone come in to take him out
around noon.  Another alternative would be doggy day care- the
activities there would be good for him, and your house would be safe.
        When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.  
---
Ruth Mays
Beautiful Downtown Cinnaminson

It's important to keep an open mind,
But not so open that your brains fall out.

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Phyll » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Buddy, my 9 1/2 mo. male, netutered, lab mix pup has taken a bite out
of my sofa and the armrest of one of my living room chairs.  I am just
sick about it.  We've had him 4 months and in that time has not
destroyed anything of that magnitude other than ocassional sock, shoes
and underwear.

I also have a 7 yr. old female dog who's never destroyed anything.
Buddy sleeps indoors with us at nights and ocassionally i even let him
stay in with Ginger (female dog) in the afternoon when i'm at work.
The last few days have been over 100 deg.

My family have all bonded with this dog.  I can't see just getting rid
of him, but how can i go back to making him be more of an outdoor dog
when he see's my other dog staying in.  I can't think of anything else
i can do and still save what furniture i have left.  

Also, when we go out of town to my sister's house, we've brought Buddy
with us.  He sleeps out under her cabanna.  I can't trust bringing him
back there either fearing he'll destroy her pool furniture.

I guess i'm needing to whine and hopeful somebody will have some ideas
that will pull me out of this hole of a depression.  Other than this
incident, he's been a loving family member.

Phyllis

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by LSaha » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


I'm sorry that I had to laugh. I just love having dogs. I had a lab mix once
that literally tried to eat the corner of the house. Had a good start too.

He just needs more exercise and he's bored, but then you knew that.  He's a dog
that needs to be worked.

Go ahead and put him on outside. Give him a nice wading pool and be sure that
he has shade. I'm sure he'll get into more trouble but in the long run, it will
be worth it. They don't stay puppies forever.

As for your sister, I'm sure the dog won't be bored on the visit, so he
shouldn't be eating furniture.

Quote:
>Buddy, my 9 1/2 mo. male, netutered, lab mix pup has taken a bite out
>of my sofa and the armrest of one of my living room chairs.  I am just
>sick about it.  We've had him 4 months and in that time has not
>destroyed anything of that magnitude other than ocassional sock, shoes
>and underwear.

>I also have a 7 yr. old female dog who's never destroyed anything.
>Buddy sleeps indoors with us at nights and ocassionally i even let him
>stay in with Ginger (female dog) in the afternoon when i'm at work.
>The last few days have been over 100 deg.

>My family have all bonded with this dog.  I can't see just getting rid
>of him, but how can i go back to making him be more of an outdoor dog
>when he see's my other dog staying in.  I can't think of anything else
>i can do and still save what furniture i have left.  

>Also, when we go out of town to my sister's house, we've brought Buddy
>with us.  He sleeps out under her cabanna.  I can't trust bringing him
>back there either fearing he'll destroy her pool furniture.

>I guess i'm needing to whine and hopeful somebody will have some ideas
>that will pull me out of this hole of a depression.  Other than this
>incident, he's been a loving family member.

Kath
Love your dog? Feed him BARF
http://members.aol.com/kf2357/barf.htm
 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Nola » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
> Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
> possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
> can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
> have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
> him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.

I agree with you...a temperature over 100 can be dangerous.  I dare anyone
who says 100 degrees is comfortable to spend the day in a wading pool, even
under a tree.  Uh uh, not me.  Crate-training is always a good idea,
although be warned I had a hound mix eat her way out of a plastic one
once...one of those huge Pet Taxi things?  Before she decided that it was
tasty too, she could open the door by herself.  In addition, in the yard,
you have him digging holes, etc...more boredom activity.

Phyllis, I am not trying to mean, honestly I am not.  I just have trouble
understanding people who buy / adopt animals without realizing the
commitment involved with it.  Getting a puppy, especially a lab mix, means
to me that my house would be a mess for a while.  My furniture might get
eaten.  My prized Persian rug might get munched.  Everything but the
foundation of the house is vulnerable when you bring home a puppy! *grins*
But people repeatedly adopt animals without a backup plan.  Without thinking
about what will happen if the puppy wets on the rug.  Without an agreement
from their landlords first...or their spouse.  Most reasons for returning
shelter dogs are things like "We're moving," "She won't stop digging holes
in the yard," or "He won't stop marking the furniture."  My animals are part
of my life, and my responsibility, and I can't see getting rid of them just
because they don't behave exactly the way I wish they would.

You seem very compassionate, Phyllis, and I think you care about your dogs
very much.  Perhaps you didn't realize all that a lab involved.  Having
worked with them at a shelter, I know I don't have the patience (or the
furniture-replacement funds) to own one myself.  I stick to terriers.  At
least they weigh less ;)  Maybe you could consider obedience training, and
lots of exercise...including the wading pool in the backyard.  If you don't
have the time to invest in him, please make sure he goes to a home where he
won't be passed on again if he's ***.

Nolan
Peanut & Queso's mom

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Phyll » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
to obedience school.  Thanks all!

Phyllis



Quote:
>> When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
>> Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
>> possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
>> can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
>> have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
>> him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.

>I agree with you...a temperature over 100 can be dangerous.  I dare anyone
>who says 100 degrees is comfortable to spend the day in a wading pool, even
>under a tree.  Uh uh, not me.  Crate-training is always a good idea,
>although be warned I had a hound mix eat her way out of a plastic one
>once...one of those huge Pet Taxi things?  Before she decided that it was
>tasty too, she could open the door by herself.  In addition, in the yard,
>you have him digging holes, etc...more boredom activity.

>Phyllis, I am not trying to mean, honestly I am not.  I just have trouble
>understanding people who buy / adopt animals without realizing the
>commitment involved with it.  Getting a puppy, especially a lab mix, means
>to me that my house would be a mess for a while.  My furniture might get
>eaten.  My prized Persian rug might get munched.  Everything but the
>foundation of the house is vulnerable when you bring home a puppy! *grins*
>But people repeatedly adopt animals without a backup plan.  Without thinking
>about what will happen if the puppy wets on the rug.  Without an agreement
>from their landlords first...or their spouse.  Most reasons for returning
>shelter dogs are things like "We're moving," "She won't stop digging holes
>in the yard," or "He won't stop marking the furniture."  My animals are part
>of my life, and my responsibility, and I can't see getting rid of them just
>because they don't behave exactly the way I wish they would.

>You seem very compassionate, Phyllis, and I think you care about your dogs
>very much.  Perhaps you didn't realize all that a lab involved.  Having
>worked with them at a shelter, I know I don't have the patience (or the
>furniture-replacement funds) to own one myself.  I stick to terriers.  At
>least they weigh less ;)  Maybe you could consider obedience training, and
>lots of exercise...including the wading pool in the backyard.  If you don't
>have the time to invest in him, please make sure he goes to a home where he
>won't be passed on again if he's ***.

>Nolan
>Peanut & Queso's mom

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Spectre&TheBeatCa » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
> 3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
> new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
> annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
> children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

> We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
> have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
> and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
> now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
> I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
> go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
> was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
> go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
> toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
> probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
> he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
> walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
> either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
> to obedience school.  Thanks all!

I'm glad you are keeping Buddy.  I also had to laugh when I read your story.  We
got Guenther when he was 5 months old, and we are his 5th owners.  He was a
bundle of energy and we loved him instantly.  However, over the next year or so,
he had many 'not so cute' moments.  He was a pretty good dog, but suffered from
separation anxiety.  I'll give you a list of some of what we've lost/replaced in
that time, so you know many of us go through the same thing:  shampoo,
conditioner, toothbrushes, cutlery, dishes, glasses, books, CD's, carpet, drapes,
shoes, shirts, razors!, brushes, hair clips, toilet paper, how many boxes of cat
food can a rotty/sheperd eat?.  After a year someone finally told us it was
separation anxiety, and we got a cage immediately.  We thought it was just
energetic puppy behaviour.

It's now been 2 years and he is wonderful.  Thankfully, nothing was too expensive
to replace, though we moved to a cheaper carpet 'just in case'.  We caged him
when we left him alone, and took him to an obedience class and continued the
lessons at home.  We are still training, and I'd like to teach him 'other
things', but at this point he knows the basics and the commands that will keep
him safe (finally).  We haven't used the cage in I don't know how long, though he
likes to sleep in it.

It is maddening to come home to a destroyed place, but one day you will laugh
about it.  Have patience, and follow the good advice given here.  Find a good
trainer that both of you are comfortable with, one that doesn't force a dog to be
'human', but understands dogs and helps you understand them.  Dogs love
unconditionally, and want nothing more than to be with you.  Remember, you've
adopted your best friend.

Good luck with obedience training.  And just think, a few years from now, he'll
clue in!  He sounds like a very lucky dog.

--
Spectre

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Sharon Le » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi Phyllis,

Hang in there, it will get better....  Based on the old saying that
misery loves company, our male GSD destroyed about a $1000
worth of stuff, from air conditioner wires to expensive area rugs,
until we realized that he was bored and we had to limit his access.

This destructive period started early (he's a high energy dog compared
to our female GSD) and I can't remember exactly when it ended......
He's now over 2 yrs. old and definitely knows what he can and cannot
touch.

Hang in there, Buddy sounds like he is going to be a wonderful
"grown-up" once he gets there.  Thanks for caring and giving
this poor fellow a chance at a good life!

Sharon


Quote:
> Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
> 3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
> new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
> annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
> children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

> We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
> have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
> and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
> now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
> I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
> go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
> was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
> go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
> toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
> probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
> he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
> walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
> either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
> to obedience school.  Thanks all!

> Phyllis



> >> When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
> >> Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
> >> possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
> >> can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
> >> have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
> >> him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.

> >I agree with you...a temperature over 100 can be dangerous.  I dare
anyone
> >who says 100 degrees is comfortable to spend the day in a wading pool,
even
> >under a tree.  Uh uh, not me.  Crate-training is always a good idea,
> >although be warned I had a hound mix eat her way out of a plastic one
> >once...one of those huge Pet Taxi things?  Before she decided that it was
> >tasty too, she could open the door by herself.  In addition, in the yard,
> >you have him digging holes, etc...more boredom activity.

> >Phyllis, I am not trying to mean, honestly I am not.  I just have trouble
> >understanding people who buy / adopt animals without realizing the
> >commitment involved with it.  Getting a puppy, especially a lab mix,
means
> >to me that my house would be a mess for a while.  My furniture might get
> >eaten.  My prized Persian rug might get munched.  Everything but the
> >foundation of the house is vulnerable when you bring home a puppy!
*grins*
> >But people repeatedly adopt animals without a backup plan.  Without
thinking
> >about what will happen if the puppy wets on the rug.  Without an
agreement
> >from their landlords first...or their spouse.  Most reasons for returning
> >shelter dogs are things like "We're moving," "She won't stop digging
holes
> >in the yard," or "He won't stop marking the furniture."  My animals are
part
> >of my life, and my responsibility, and I can't see getting rid of them
just
> >because they don't behave exactly the way I wish they would.

> >You seem very compassionate, Phyllis, and I think you care about your
dogs
> >very much.  Perhaps you didn't realize all that a lab involved.  Having
> >worked with them at a shelter, I know I don't have the patience (or the
> >furniture-replacement funds) to own one myself.  I stick to terriers.  At
> >least they weigh less ;)  Maybe you could consider obedience training,
and
> >lots of exercise...including the wading pool in the backyard.  If you
don't
> >have the time to invest in him, please make sure he goes to a home where
he
> >won't be passed on again if he's ***.

> >Nolan
> >Peanut & Queso's mom

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by shell » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
>go freely.  

i have one destruct-O-doggie who has to be crated when i'm
not home.  she gets a little anxious when i'm not with her
and tears stuff up.  she even does it when i'm in the shower
if i forget to leave door open (she likes to check up on
me).  my other dog is a perfect angel in the house and
wouldn't dream of touching anything that wasn't his.  so,
harriet the terror gets crated and elliott the angel gets
the run of the house.  it's worked out great.  i wouldn't
worry about the puppy being upset because the other dog is
loose and he isn't.  they will both adapt to the arrangement
quickly.

also, it sounds like he's been pretty good out of the crate
and that this is just a set back.  he's hit that awful
puppy-*** age when they lose what little brain they had.
he *will* outgrow it. <G>  you can see why, though, so many
dogs are sent to the shelter when they hit this age.  it's
frustrating for owners to see their dogs regress.

Quote:
> He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
>probably a bad combination.  

au contraire!  elliott, my "good" dog, is a pit bull/chow
mix.  pit bulls are wonderful dogs.  they're people
friendly, very tolerant of kids mauling them, athletic and
all-around good family companions.  the ones i've met have
also had *great* senses of humor.  they can be dog
aggressive, so that's something to keep an eye on.  when i
began looking for a second dog, my top two breed picks were
pit bulls and boxers.

Quote:
>I do know we can't give him away, because
>he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
>walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
>either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
>to obedience school.  Thanks all!

it sounds like you will be able to get the situation under
control.  i would definitely up his exercise level.  if he's
a pit bull/lab mix, he's probably always going to have a
high energy level.  obedience school is a fantastic idea.
not only will it help with his behavior, but it will be
great for his socialization.  since he's a pit mix, lots of
socialization is a Very Good Thing!

to be honest, he sounds like my kind of dog--i like the
rotten ones. <G>  let us know how things progress with him.
good luck!

shelly and elliott & harriet
http://www.moonsgarden.com/
remove SPAMALOPE to e-mail me
--
I recommend to all rpdb readers that Jerry Howe
should be ignored as a crank and waste of time

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Lori » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


My 3 yr. GR once chewed a huge hole in my sons brand new mattress...full
sized!  My 11/2 yr old GR chewed a hole in the wall in the hallway.  Puppies
will chew!
   I'd go back to the crating for awhile...I  did, and the dog was
fine...and so was my furniture.

--
Lori, and Lacie,Sam, and Bubba ( the *** people)

Quote:


> > Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
> > 3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
> > new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
> > annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
> > children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

> > We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
> > have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
> > and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
> > now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
> > I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
> > go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
> > was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
> > go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
> > toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
> > probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
> > he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
> > walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
> > either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
> > to obedience school.  Thanks all!

> I'm glad you are keeping Buddy.  I also had to laugh when I read your
story.  We
> got Guenther when he was 5 months old, and we are his 5th owners.  He was
a
> bundle of energy and we loved him instantly.  However, over the next year
or so,
> he had many 'not so cute' moments.  He was a pretty good dog, but suffered
from
> separation anxiety.  I'll give you a list of some of what we've
lost/replaced in
> that time, so you know many of us go through the same thing:  shampoo,
> conditioner, toothbrushes, cutlery, dishes, glasses, books, CD's, carpet,
drapes,
> shoes, shirts, razors!, brushes, hair clips, toilet paper, how many boxes
of cat
> food can a rotty/sheperd eat?.  After a year someone finally told us it
was
> separation anxiety, and we got a cage immediately.  We thought it was just
> energetic puppy behaviour.

> It's now been 2 years and he is wonderful.  Thankfully, nothing was too
expensive
> to replace, though we moved to a cheaper carpet 'just in case'.  We caged
him
> when we left him alone, and took him to an obedience class and continued
the
> lessons at home.  We are still training, and I'd like to teach him 'other
> things', but at this point he knows the basics and the commands that will
keep
> him safe (finally).  We haven't used the cage in I don't know how long,
though he
> likes to sleep in it.

> It is maddening to come home to a destroyed place, but one day you will
laugh
> about it.  Have patience, and follow the good advice given here.  Find a
good
> trainer that both of you are comfortable with, one that doesn't force a
dog to be
> 'human', but understands dogs and helps you understand them.  Dogs love
> unconditionally, and want nothing more than to be with you.  Remember,
you've
> adopted your best friend.

> Good luck with obedience training.  And just think, a few years from now,
he'll
> clue in!  He sounds like a very lucky dog.

> --
> Spectre

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Anne-Mari » Fri, 21 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi
My youngest Weimaraner is a real chewer, the cure?  we leave
cardboard boxes around for him to vent his boredom and
frustration on when we are not home.  Dogs don't reealize the
value of things, so slippers and sofa are the aame as........I
hope things go ok

AM

Information on Weimaraners

http://sites.netscape.net/annemariebrad/index.htm

-----------------------------------------------------------

Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
Up to 100 minutes free!
http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Phyll » Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Excellent idea!!  My folks just got a new computer and they have lots
of cardboard available.  Today, i went to buy a baby gate.  Buddy can
stay in my washer/dryer room.  I have a fan also set up for him. He
also has acess via doggie door from there. I thought tho i could use
the gate to separate him from the rest of the laundry room/kitchen.
That way he would sill have a/c.   I put it up at lunch, went back to
work. At five o'cloick i raced home and noticed he didn't greet me at
the door. Hmmmm, figured he must be in the backyard.  Good sign,  the
gate was still up and intact, however Buddy was stretching and yawning
on the other side of it along side Ginger.  Don't know exactly how he
got over it without knocking it down.  Best part is....he didn't TOUCH
the furniture.  I'm still thinking of ideas tho.  Will get cardboard
tomorrow.

Phyllis

On Thu, 20 Jul 2000 15:25:31 -0700, Anne-Marie

Quote:

>Hi
>My youngest Weimaraner is a real chewer, the cure?  we leave
>cardboard boxes around for him to vent his boredom and
>frustration on when we are not home.  Dogs don't reealize the
>value of things, so slippers and sofa are the aame as........I
>hope things go ok

>AM

>Information on Weimaraners

>http://sites.netscape.net/annemariebrad/index.htm

>-----------------------------------------------------------

>Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
>Up to 100 minutes free!
>http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Nola » Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:00:00


I apologize for my tirade, then.  Since you've had Buddy returned three
times, you can hopefully see where I was coming from.

Best of luck to you :)

Nolan

p.s. my same hound / lab mix that ate her way out of a crate also used to
sit and chew on the sheetrock on the walls...I was SO glad when her bad
puppy traits wore off ;)

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by jd.. » Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:00:00


One thing you might try, if it's not too hot, is to walk him in the morning
before you go to work.  I do that with my six year old dog, and I think it
helps her disposition. Good on you for rescuing this dog.  jdoee and Stacey
Dog

----------


Quote:
> Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
> 3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
> new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
> annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
> children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

> We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
> have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
> and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
> now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
> I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
> go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
> was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
> go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
> toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
> probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
> he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
> walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
> either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
> to obedience school.  Thanks all!

> Phyllis



>>> When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
>>> Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
>>> possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
>>> can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
>>> have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
>>> him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.

>>I agree with you...a temperature over 100 can be dangerous.  I dare anyone
>>who says 100 degrees is comfortable to spend the day in a wading pool, even
>>under a tree.  Uh uh, not me.  Crate-training is always a good idea,
>>although be warned I had a hound mix eat her way out of a plastic one
>>once...one of those huge Pet Taxi things?  Before she decided that it was
>>tasty too, she could open the door by herself.  In addition, in the yard,
>>you have him digging holes, etc...more boredom activity.

>>Phyllis, I am not trying to mean, honestly I am not.  I just have trouble
>>understanding people who buy / adopt animals without realizing the
>>commitment involved with it.  Getting a puppy, especially a lab mix, means
>>to me that my house would be a mess for a while.  My furniture might get
>>eaten.  My prized Persian rug might get munched.  Everything but the
>>foundation of the house is vulnerable when you bring home a puppy! *grins*
>>But people repeatedly adopt animals without a backup plan.  Without thinking
>>about what will happen if the puppy wets on the rug.  Without an agreement
>>from their landlords first...or their spouse.  Most reasons for returning
>>shelter dogs are things like "We're moving," "She won't stop digging holes
>>in the yard," or "He won't stop marking the furniture."  My animals are part
>>of my life, and my responsibility, and I can't see getting rid of them just
>>because they don't behave exactly the way I wish they would.

>>You seem very compassionate, Phyllis, and I think you care about your dogs
>>very much.  Perhaps you didn't realize all that a lab involved.  Having
>>worked with them at a shelter, I know I don't have the patience (or the
>>furniture-replacement funds) to own one myself.  I stick to terriers.  At
>>least they weigh less ;)  Maybe you could consider obedience training, and
>>lots of exercise...including the wading pool in the backyard.  If you don't
>>have the time to invest in him, please make sure he goes to a home where he
>>won't be passed on again if he's ***.

>>Nolan
>>Peanut & Queso's mom

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by Phyll » Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Thanks, i tried not to get too attached to him and giving him away got
harder everytime.  The 3rd time was the hardest and i told my husband
if he didn't bond with that families children, we were going to keep
him.  He's just the cutest thing.

My husband had begun jogging him around the block before his regular
morning jog, but has gone away this week on business.  He'll be back
today and hopefully resume taking him out in the morning tomorrow.

I have Rheumatoid Arthritis and sometimes can't get going that early.
I do take them both walking in the evening tho.  I loop their leash
over my cane.  Don't use the cane for walking, but for leverage when
they pull me.  LOL, I know my neighbors must laugh, because it looks
like i'm walking the Clydesdales or something.

Phyllis

Quote:

>One thing you might try, if it's not too hot, is to walk him in the morning
>before you go to work.  I do that with my six year old dog, and I think it
>helps her disposition. Good on you for rescuing this dog.  jdoee and Stacey
>Dog

>----------


>> Thanks all for the feedback.  I rescued Buddy and had found him a home
>> 3 times and 3 times he was returned.  The first decided to move in a
>> new house w/o a fence.  The second family's other dog was to old and
>> annoyed by him and the 3rd family wanted a dog to play with there
>> children.  Buddy was abandoned at a school track and abused by kids.

>> We felt Buddy kept coming back because he was meant to be with us.  We
>> have no children so our pet are replacements for them.  My other dog
>> and cat are as well behaved than most children.  Buddy also up until
>> now has been blending in.  I think he was bored and decided to chew.
>> I have a huge yard and they have a doggie door and freedom to come and
>> go.  He was crated at first but hasn't been for some time because he
>> was doing so well.  I'm sure he will hate it especially seeing Ginger
>> go freely.  I didn't realized labs like to chew.  He does chew all his
>> toys and chewie stuff.  He's mixed i think with pit bull and that's
>> probably a bad combination.  I do know we can't give him away, because
>> he wouldn't get the attention he does with us.  They get an evening
>> walk and 2 on weekends.  Apparantly running in the yard isn't enuff
>> either.  I'm feeling a bit better this morning.  He's definitely going
>> to obedience school.  Thanks all!

>> Phyllis



>>>> When the temperature is over 100, leaving him outside is risky.
>>>> Even with shade and access to water, heat stroke is a real
>>>> possibility.  If you have neighbors, leaving him outside alone all day
>>>> can be risky too.  If he barks and annoys the neighbors, you would
>>>> have a problem. Someone could come and steal him; someone could hurt
>>>> him or he could get out of the fence and be gone.

>>>I agree with you...a temperature over 100 can be dangerous.  I dare anyone
>>>who says 100 degrees is comfortable to spend the day in a wading pool, even
>>>under a tree.  Uh uh, not me.  Crate-training is always a good idea,
>>>although be warned I had a hound mix eat her way out of a plastic one
>>>once...one of those huge Pet Taxi things?  Before she decided that it was
>>>tasty too, she could open the door by herself.  In addition, in the yard,
>>>you have him digging holes, etc...more boredom activity.

>>>Phyllis, I am not trying to mean, honestly I am not.  I just have trouble
>>>understanding people who buy / adopt animals without realizing the
>>>commitment involved with it.  Getting a puppy, especially a lab mix, means
>>>to me that my house would be a mess for a while.  My furniture might get
>>>eaten.  My prized Persian rug might get munched.  Everything but the
>>>foundation of the house is vulnerable when you bring home a puppy! *grins*
>>>But people repeatedly adopt animals without a backup plan.  Without thinking
>>>about what will happen if the puppy wets on the rug.  Without an agreement
>>>from their landlords first...or their spouse.  Most reasons for returning
>>>shelter dogs are things like "We're moving," "She won't stop digging holes
>>>in the yard," or "He won't stop marking the furniture."  My animals are part
>>>of my life, and my responsibility, and I can't see getting rid of them just
>>>because they don't behave exactly the way I wish they would.

>>>You seem very compassionate, Phyllis, and I think you care about your dogs
>>>very much.  Perhaps you didn't realize all that a lab involved.  Having
>>>worked with them at a shelter, I know I don't have the patience (or the
>>>furniture-replacement funds) to own one myself.  I stick to terriers.  At
>>>least they weigh less ;)  Maybe you could consider obedience training, and
>>>lots of exercise...including the wading pool in the backyard.  If you don't
>>>have the time to invest in him, please make sure he goes to a home where he
>>>won't be passed on again if he's ***.

>>>Nolan
>>>Peanut & Queso's mom

 
 
 

I am SOOOO Sick

Post by dogsnu » Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Excellent idea!!

snip
Excellent way to get a dead dog!
Cardboard is paper. When paper swells, as it does when the dog
drinks water, it's apt to cause a blockadge in the intestines.
If you're quick, you might be able to save the dog in surgery
to the tune of around 2k or more. If you're not quick enough,
you just come home to a dead dog.
Terri

Quote:

> >Hi
> >My youngest Weimaraner is a real chewer, the cure?  we leave
> >cardboard boxes around for him to vent his boredom and
> >frustration on when we are not home.  Dogs don't reealize the
> >value of things, so slippers and sofa are the aame as........I
> >hope things go ok

So, pick UP those things so the dog doesn't have access to them!
You do have hands and doors, yes?
Geesh!
Terri