1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

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1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

Post by Doroth » Sat, 12 May 2001 00:47:03



I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make my dog ( Desi) stop
barking so damn much. All he does is bark bark bark. I have tried everything
from the ten penny can, to water bottle, to saying quiet and when he does
praise praise.
Does anyone have ANY other ideas. I'd really appreciate it!
Thanks alot!
 
 
 

1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

Post by Ron Ayou » Sat, 12 May 2001 01:04:36


Try a bit of exercise. My dog barks when she sees people outside because she
feels lonely inside and wants to play with the neighbors kids. So I take her
out until she is tired and then she doesn't bark until the next day when it
is time for more exercise.

I think my dog barks specifically because she expresses her frustration of
wanting to run around but not being able to. I don't consider this a problem
since daily exercise is a requirement anyway and she is not being
unreasonable in barking.


Quote:
> I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make my dog ( Desi) stop
> barking so damn much. All he does is bark bark bark. I have tried
everything
> from the ten penny can, to water bottle, to saying quiet and when he does
> praise praise.
> Does anyone have ANY other ideas. I'd really appreciate it!
> Thanks alot!

 
 
 

1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

Post by Jerry How » Sat, 12 May 2001 01:42:18


Hello Dorothy,


Quote:
> I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make my dog
> ( Desi) stop barking so damn much.

Yeah. That's EZ.

Quote:
> All he does is bark bark bark.

Dogs are built for that.

Quote:
> I have tried everything from the ten penny can,

Yeah? That always works for me. Perhaps you didn't follow the proper
technique? No reason why you shouldn't be able to use it effectively
if you use the scientific technique properly, wouldn't you agree?

Quote:
> to water bottle,

I don't know that method.

Quote:
> to saying quiet and when he does praise praise.

Heel, if that was gonna work, I'd do that myself. Telling the dog
quiet is an oppositional command. That's going to immediately set
you and the dog against each other. The liklihood that he'll quiet
down long enough to be told he's good, is slim.

Were you to understand the way dogs think, you'd perhaps tell him
quiet good boy, that's a nice dog, and he'd be more than happy to
comply. When you hold out the reward, he holds out the response, and
nobody gets nuthin but frustrated. That's why dog bark much of the
time... And our efforts to correct them only make the situation
worse in most cases.

Quote:
> Does anyone have ANY other ideas.

Yeah. I also got a machine that teaches dogs not to bark.

Quote:
> I'd really appreciate it!

But I've also got the instructions so you'll be able to do the work
yourself.

Quote:
> Thanks alot!

Using this technique is the easiest and fastest way to
break any behavior. There are a number of things that
have to be considered when beginning this approach. A
few preliminary exercises in the FREE Wits' End Dog
Training Method manual will explain the basic handling
techniques you should learn. Using them will insure that
this method will work to a high degree of proficiency.

SOUND DISTRACTION AND PRAISE TECHNIQUE

The problem is that not many people understand how
to use the sound distraction and praise techniques
correctly, and do not know HOWE to use the come
command as a default, if the sound does not work on
occasion. When you are told these methods have been
tried and didn't work, rest assured that whomever
"tried" it and for whom it did not work, did not
"try" doing it correctly. If the technique does not work,
the come command is to be used as a default, and a
new attempt at addressing the problem can begin.

I've heard a couple of the "experts" saying they've
tried it, and it didn't work for them or it made their dog
nervous. Those are usually the experts who ***and
shock dogs, and are trying to FORCE the dog using
sound instead of *** or shocking... Many of them
have never read the techniques presented here, and
are using inappropriate or incorrect methods.

There are some people who do not follow directions
and get lousy results, and there are people who do not
allow the technique adequate repetition to be
successful. There is no excuse that these techniques
will not work if done correctly, they are a scientific
fact.

Any sound will suffice. Ideally, the sound would be the
same each time, but that is not always possible. A
single clap of the hands or snap of the fingers would
do, if it were followed by praise, and as long as it does
not happen twice in succession from the same point of
origin. That's why several penny cans are required, or
a friend or family member can be enlisted to clap their
hands or snap their fingers, to create another source
of sound distraction. You cannot use the same penny
can for more than two occasions in succession.

Once it's been tossed, it must remain where it falls,
till the exercise if finished.

The sound must always be instantly followed by
PROLONGED (5-15 seconds), non physical praise.
The sound must never occur from the same point of
origin twice in succession. The sound must be brief.
Any UNINTENTIONAL sounding should be avoided and
PRAISED if it occurs. That will let the dogs know it was
not intended for them.

When more than one dog is present when using sound
distractions and praise techniques, all dogs present must
receive praise with direct eye contact so they will
UNDERSTAND they were not being addressed. The
praise must continue constantly for several seconds
following any sound cue to allow the thought process
to be completed.

The behavior MUST be allowed or CAUSED to be
repeated and interrupted AGAIN using sound and
praise until the behavior is broken. And most
importantly, the moment the dog thinks of resuming
the behavior, you must praise him.

That's right. When the dog thinks about resuming the
behaviorpraise him at that exact moment, and the
previous DISTRACTIONS will be restimulated in the
dogs mind, and the behavior will QUICKLY be
extinguished. That's why trying to prevent the dog
from doing a behavior is COUNTERPRODUCTIVE.
You end up distracting the dog's thoughts from the
behavior we are teaching or breaking.

That seems to be the real hard part for the trainers
here to understand. They want to make it happen, and
they interfere with the dog's thought process. The dog
will learn through the process of elimination of
alternative actions or behaviors. It ONLY takes a few
minutes, and the behavior is eliminated, rather than
repressed and seething to resume, as is the case with
physical or verbal corrections, confrontation, or
punishment "techniques."

The trainer will confound his efforts when they insist
on telling the dog "NO!," instead of relying on the
conditioning that has been established. Shouting at the
dog will often trigger the opposite of the desired effect.
Phyisical opposition is triggered through force or pressure,
emotional opposition is triggered through negative emotions.

What further complicates the process for the trainer, is
that they break the conditioning when they respond
with a different corrective technique out of a
reflexive reaction of their own, such as screaming
"No!," or reaching out to grab the dog and physically
correcting the dog for a further instance of
malbehavior, rather than taking the moment to THINK
about the best way to address the problem, and
if necessary, search for a can or figure out some way
to create an appropriate, brief, distraction, and follow
through with the appropriate sound distraction and praise.

(If you're still following, you now understand why "traditional?"
trainers confound their dogs, by jerking the lead and
shouting NO. Someone ought to mention that, don't you
agree?)

The process must be carried out using an alternate
source of sound for the next interruption. An associate
could be enlisted and instructed to clap their hands on
signal to accomplish the desired sound interruption, a
can with some pennies may be used, a coincidental.
spontaneous occuring sound might serve us well.

Just imagine HOWE your dog is going to react if you
knew there's going to be a peal of thunder, and you
timed it so as to correspond to a failed come command???

We want the dog to exhaust all of the alternative
malbehaviors he can pull out of his bag of tricks,
in order for us to extinguish them EACH in turn.

Any time we interact in a behavior by telling the dog
no, or physically restrain or correct him, we are
becoming part of the behavior, either as a player or
competitor in the dog's mischief.

Using sound as a distraction must always be followed
by immediate, prolonged, non physical praise.
Interrupting a behavior with sound should never be
associated with us, as in voicing "no," or telling the
dog to "stop it." That's going to cause animostiy,
and teach the dog to control you.

The behavior should NOT be distracted with any
PHYSICAL INTERVENTION. We want the behavior to
begin again, so that we may have another opportunity
to properly address the behavior with another sound
distraction and praise.

That way, we can completely end a problem while the
dog is THINKING about it, and we are prepared to
address the issue before it becomes out of control. The
sound must never occur twice in a row from the same
direction.

In other words, if you snapped your fingers in front of
the dog to stop him from chewing on your shoelace,
you'd praise him for five to fif*** seconds immediately
upon snapping your fingers.

The behavior will hopefully resume, and the next
attempt at chewing the shoelace, the sound of the
snap of your fingers must come from behind the dog, or
even from a friend assisting from across the room, from
a soda can with a few pennies in it, or any source of
sound (except our voice!), followed by prolonged, non
physical praise, until the dog is no longer thinking
about the behavior, or resumes it.

The third interruption of the behavior usually gets the
message across, and the dog will think about the
behavior for just a moment before engaging in it once
again for the fourth and last time...

That split second of thinking about engaging in the
behavior requires praise. Do not react to it with a
challenge of shouting no, or physically removing
the temptation.

That moment of thinking about resuming the behavior
and the praise it earns him, will validate the prior
interruptions of that behavior.The dog then needs to
test it out, to be sure that the same behavior will be
dealt with in exactly the same manner. They will
usually make a fourth attempt at the behavior, and if
you follow through appropriately, he will learn not to do
that behavior anymore. But only on the one shoelace!
He must take that behavior to other instances to fully
extinguish his desire for the behavior.

The behavior will not be completely broken until he has
taken the process of elimination to the second, third,
and fourth opportunity to explore that behavior. And,
even at that, you may need to repeat the process in
four completely different places to generalize it.

That means that the worst behavior may need up to
sixty-four properly timed interruptions and praise.
Usually it happens much quicker than that.

Breaking a behavior in this manner reduces stress, ...

read more »

 
 
 

1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

Post by Lea » Sat, 12 May 2001 08:51:33


Quote:

>I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make my dog ( Desi) stop
>barking so damn much. All he does is bark bark bark. I have tried everything
>from the ten penny can, to water bottle, to saying quiet and when he does
>praise praise.
>Does anyone have ANY other ideas. I'd really appreciate it!
>Thanks alot!

LOL!  Welcome to the wonderful world of eskies.

I ended up learning how to live with it.  I kept my windows closed, blinds
drawn (so he wouldn't see leaves fall or grass blow in the wind, since that's
all it took to start a barking fit), and was always ready to quickly grab him
and get him inside when he started announcing his presence in the neighborhood.

I found ONE method that would help.  I would get on the floor with him, start
to cuddle him, and whisper, "Shhh, shhh" to him.  He wouldn't stop completely,
but he would calm down to a lower-decibel. :}

Of course, distraction helps too - "Want a cookie?" was usually a good way to
get his mind off whatever he was barking at (such as the air :}.

If he was being really obnoxious - such as barking at guests non-stop - I would
put him in another room until he calmed down.

Eskies are communicators.  Most of the time, I found my eskie's vocalizations
charming - he had such a wide range of them.  Not so for the barking, though.
Guess you gotta take the good with the bad. :}

Learn How to Can Spam
http://www.whew.com/Spammers/reportspam_stepbystep.shtml
http://www.spamfree.org/
WHITE HAT OF THE MONTH - Nominate At:  http://www.whitehat.com/whotm/
Internet Secrets, 2nd Edition, by John Levine (All About Spam, p. 277)

 
 
 

1 Year Old American Eskimo BARK BARK BARK

Post by Jerry How » Sun, 13 May 2001 01:07:33


Hello leah,


Quote:
> LOL!  Welcome to the wonderful world of eskies.

Yeah? A dog is a dog, leah.

Quote:
> I ended up learning how to live with it.

Yes, because you're an inconsiderate, vicious lout.

Quote:
> I kept my windows closed, blinds drawn

You can run, but you can't hide.

Quote:
> (so he wouldn't see leaves fall or grass blow in the wind, since
> that's all it took to start a barking fit),

Because he's anxious and insecure and untrained and improperly
handled and managed. All small little human problems.

Quote:
> and was always ready to quickly grab him and get him
> inside when he started announcing his presence in the
> neighborhood.

Yes, blame the dog for you not being intelligent enough to outwit a
puppy dog even when I tell you HOWE.

Quote:
> I found ONE method that would help.

Did you really now? This ought to be precious...

Quote:
> I would get on the floor with him, start to cuddle him, and
whisper,
> "Shhh, shhh" to him.  He wouldn't stop completely,
> but he would calm down to a lower-decibel. :}

Good idea leah. I'll teach that to my students.

Quote:
> Of course, distraction helps too - "Want a cookie?"

No thanks. HOWE about a nich ear pinch or shock or ***instead?

Quote:
> was usually a good way to get his mind off whatever he was barking
> at (such as the air :}.

Yeah. That air does it all the time.

Quote:
> If he was being really obnoxious - such as barking at guests non-
> stop - I would put him in another room until he calmed down.

Excellent training tip. I'll share that with my students too...

Quote:
> Eskies are communicators.

Yeah? What's he tell you besides you're frustrating him?

Quote:
> Most of the time, I found my eskie's vocalizations charming -

Yes, must be love stories he's telling you when he barks out of
control at everything. Nice you enjoy his disomfit.

Quote:
> he had such a wide range of them.

No doubt. Eskies are real communicators. What do you suppose he's
communicating when he barks uncontrollably?

Quote:
>  Not so for the barking, though.

Yeah. That kind of persistent barking usually just means you're not
listening to him, and he's gonna keep insisting till he bursts.

Quote:
> Guess you gotta take the good with the bad. :}

Yeah. Just ignore it. That communication stuff is best dealt with
using a shock or pronged ***collar.

Have a SLEAZY day, leah. Bye! j;~}

Quote:
> Learn How to Can Spam
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/
> WHITE HAT OF THE MONTH - Nominate At:

http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Quote:
> Internet Secrets, 2nd Edition, by John Levine (All About Spam, p.
277)