New Human Baby + Old Dog Baby

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New Human Baby + Old Dog Baby

Post by Joanna Joh » Thu, 29 Jun 1995 04:00:00



We are expecting (two days ago !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) a baby, and are
looking for suggestions to maximize the chances of our canine
baby (3 year old spayed hyper female lab) getting used to the
idea.  My cousin had to put his dog down because the dog was
aggressive and I am determined to make this work.  Tessa is
very excitable, but extremely friendly to humans.  She hates
other dogs but that is another story altogether.  She has been
to obedience school and is very well behaved when she doesn't get
over e***d and has never shown any aggression to humans.

My plan so far, is to have my husband bring a blanket with baby
smell on it home from the hospital to let her smell it.  When
we come home from the hospital, I (mom who will have been away),
will come in first and say hi to Tessa and with Dad controlling
Tessa, let her smell the baby.  I will do my best to show Tessa
affection and attention when I am up with the baby - she follows
me everywhere in the house so it won't take much to scratch her ear
or rub her tummy with my foot when I am feeding.  I am looking
forwards to walks with Tessa and the baby later on.

Any other suggestions?  Is there something that worked really well
for you?   Something to avoid?  
I will never leave the two together unsupervised but I hope
Tessa will be as good a friend to my baby as she is to me!

Thanks
Joanna  - Big, uncomfortable and impatient

 
 
 

New Human Baby + Old Dog Baby

Post by Diane Steec » Fri, 30 Jun 1995 04:00:00


If you haven't already, you might read "Childproofing your Dog" by Brian
Kilcommons (or Killcommons?) and Sarah Wilson.  

Quote:

> We are expecting (two days ago !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) a baby, and are
> looking for suggestions to maximize the chances of our canine
> baby (3 year old spayed hyper female lab) getting used to the
> idea.  My cousin had to put his dog down because the dog was
> aggressive and I am determined to make this work.  Tessa is
> very excitable, but extremely friendly to humans.  She hates
> other dogs but that is another story altogether.  She has been
> to obedience school and is very well behaved when she doesn't get
> over e***d and has never shown any aggression to humans.

> My plan so far, is to have my husband bring a blanket with baby
> smell on it home from the hospital to let her smell it.  When
> we come home from the hospital, I (mom who will have been away),
> will come in first and say hi to Tessa and with Dad controlling
> Tessa, let her smell the baby.  I will do my best to show Tessa
> affection and attention when I am up with the baby - she follows
> me everywhere in the house so it won't take much to scratch her ear
> or rub her tummy with my foot when I am feeding.  I am looking
> forwards to walks with Tessa and the baby later on.

> Any other suggestions?  Is there something that worked really well
> for you?   Something to avoid?  
> I will never leave the two together unsupervised but I hope
> Tessa will be as good a friend to my baby as she is to me!

> Thanks
> Joanna  - Big, uncomfortable and impatient

 
 
 

New Human Baby + Old Dog Baby

Post by Katharine E. Ma » Mon, 03 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Joanna,

If Tessa is basically human-friendly she probably won't act
aggressive to the baby. Actually, we found that the initial
months were no big deal--the baby is up high in your arms, its
crib, the changing table, etc. so even if the dog isn't so keen
on it it won't have much opportunity to express its feelings.
Things can get more problematic once the baby starts crawling
around, even if the dog's intentions are entirely friendly.
You can teach a kid that's 18 months or up not to maul
a dog, but babies in the first flush of mobility, at around 9-10
months, just don't get it. Moreover the dog can hurt the baby
(usually not seriously!)
without meaning too, say by wagging its tail hard against it or
knocking it over by mistake when its balance is still wobbly.
This is the point where your supervision is crucial. If you're
lucky Tessa will realize that the baby is immature and treat it
with unusual gentleness--many big dogs are like this--but in
case she doesn't, you may want to work on her "stays" and buy
some baby-gates or a crate for Tessa so you can keep your two
dependents separated when necessary. During these months you
also may want to feed Tessa when the baby is having its nap, so
you won't have altercations over the food bowl.

Katharine Maus