Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

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Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by rick » Tue, 20 Mar 2001 12:06:07



I recently brought home a 10 week old Yellow Lab Pup. He's a beauty.

Anyway, In comparing him to my now-departed and much beloved Black Lab,
I'm finding significant differences. For one thing, the new pup doesn't
appear interested in chasing a ball or a stick. I've tried a number of
times to get him into it, but he generally doesn't respond. There have
been a few cases in which he's gone after a small *** ball, but he
then just kind of forgets about it, and doesn't retrieve it.

Again, my Black Lab was enthusiastic and energetic at this point. He
chased anything that I threw, and brought it back immediately (for
another round.)

Further, my Yellow Lab doesn't look interested in much of anything.
He's sleeping quite a bit, and is not very animated when awake. The Vets
say that he's in great shape, and he's been checked for worms and stuff.

I'm just wondering whether it's possible that this Lab just isn't as
genetically wired to do this Lab stuff. By the way, he has excellent
lineage, but his parents weren't field dogs.

I'm not into hunting; my lab will never go "into the field" per se. But
I do excercise my dogs by throwing balls, sticks, frisbees, etc. I take
them to swim fairly often, and I like them to be enthusiastic about
playtime, as it keeps them in great shape. We have a Golden Retiever who
is very gung ho; the Yellow Lab just watches him, and doesn't want to
get involved.

Now, it's worth mentioning that I've only had this guy for a week, or so.
It's possible that he's just getting used to the new gig. My guess is
that he'll come around, in time.

But I'm interested in hearing what you have to say regarding these
matters. If you have useful feedback, then I'm all ears.

rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Elizabet » Tue, 20 Mar 2001 13:09:20




Quote:
>I recently brought home a 10 week old Yellow Lab Pup. He's a beauty.

>Anyway, In comparing him to my now-departed and much beloved Black Lab,
>I'm finding significant differences. For one thing, the new pup doesn't
>appear interested in chasing a ball or a stick. I've tried a number of
>times to get him into it, but he generally doesn't respond. There have
>been a few cases in which he's gone after a small *** ball, but he
>then just kind of forgets about it, and doesn't retrieve it.

>Again, my Black Lab was enthusiastic and energetic at this point. He
>chased anything that I threw, and brought it back immediately (for
>another round.)

>Further, my Yellow Lab doesn't look interested in much of anything.
>He's sleeping quite a bit, and is not very animated when awake. The Vets
>say that he's in great shape, and he's been checked for worms and stuff.

>I'm just wondering whether it's possible that this Lab just isn't as
>genetically wired to do this Lab stuff. By the way, he has excellent
>lineage, but his parents weren't field dogs.

>I'm not into hunting; my lab will never go "into the field" per se. But
>I do excercise my dogs by throwing balls, sticks, frisbees, etc. I take
>them to swim fairly often, and I like them to be enthusiastic about
>playtime, as it keeps them in great shape. We have a Golden Retiever who
>is very gung ho; the Yellow Lab just watches him, and doesn't want to
>get involved.

>Now, it's worth mentioning that I've only had this guy for a week, or so.
>It's possible that he's just getting used to the new gig. My guess is
>that he'll come around, in time.

>But I'm interested in hearing what you have to say regarding these
>matters. If you have useful feedback, then I'm all ears.

>rick

This/your case is a perfect example of NOT trying to get another dog
just like old ----.
To even begin to compare him is so unfair to the new pup I cannot tell
you.
Every dog is different. Every line is different. You must not expect
your new puppy to do anything your old dog did. He's a new little
being. Don't judge him by your old dog. Encourage him in what he is
good at. Feel him out gradually. Actually he sounds like the kind of
dog most of the world would like these days according to some of the
posts we see here. Certainly sounds like my type of a dog these
days.<G>
Love him and be happy he isn't tearing your house apart and barking
and peeing 24/7. And if you really don't like his type temperament,
then next time make sure you go for a wild puppy in a litter from wild
and energectic parents.
Liz
 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by MaliMor » Tue, 20 Mar 2001 16:38:49


I have a Black Lab/Border Collie that could care less about toys, usually.
Sometimes he'll go get the ball when you throw it.  Other times, he just
looks at it and then looks at you like, "You threw it, you go get it."  Some
dogs are just crazy about toys and others aren't.  I couldn't tell you how
to make them that way.  I've got a Chihuahua/Terrier (?) mix that is nuts
about toys, but my Boxer tops them all on love for toys.  None of my other
Boxers in all my life had any interest in them.

Maybe your pup will never have an interest in that.  Like Liz K said, just
love your puppy :O)  If he's a couch potato, so be it.  Plus, he's just a
pup...maybe he'll grow into toys or something.  Try getting ones that make
noise, those seem to work best at getting their attention (even if it's only
for a short time).

Mali


Quote:
> I recently brought home a 10 week old Yellow Lab Pup. He's a beauty.

> Anyway, In comparing him to my now-departed and much beloved Black Lab,
> I'm finding significant differences. For one thing, the new pup doesn't
> appear interested in chasing a ball or a stick. I've tried a number of
> times to get him into it, but he generally doesn't respond. There have
> been a few cases in which he's gone after a small *** ball, but he
> then just kind of forgets about it, and doesn't retrieve it.

> Again, my Black Lab was enthusiastic and energetic at this point. He
> chased anything that I threw, and brought it back immediately (for
> another round.)

> Further, my Yellow Lab doesn't look interested in much of anything.
> He's sleeping quite a bit, and is not very animated when awake. The Vets
> say that he's in great shape, and he's been checked for worms and stuff.

> I'm just wondering whether it's possible that this Lab just isn't as
> genetically wired to do this Lab stuff. By the way, he has excellent
> lineage, but his parents weren't field dogs.

> I'm not into hunting; my lab will never go "into the field" per se. But
> I do excercise my dogs by throwing balls, sticks, frisbees, etc. I take
> them to swim fairly often, and I like them to be enthusiastic about
> playtime, as it keeps them in great shape. We have a Golden Retiever who
> is very gung ho; the Yellow Lab just watches him, and doesn't want to
> get involved.

> Now, it's worth mentioning that I've only had this guy for a week, or so.
> It's possible that he's just getting used to the new gig. My guess is
> that he'll come around, in time.

> But I'm interested in hearing what you have to say regarding these
> matters. If you have useful feedback, then I'm all ears.

> rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by rick » Tue, 20 Mar 2001 23:59:33



Quote:

> This/your case is a perfect example of NOT trying to get another dog
> just like old ----.
> To even begin to compare him is so unfair to the new pup I cannot tell
> you.
> Every dog is different. Every line is different. You must not expect
> your new puppy to do anything your old dog did. He's a new little
> being. Don't judge him by your old dog. Encourage him in what he is
> good at. Feel him out gradually. Actually he sounds like the kind of
> dog most of the world would like these days according to some of the
> posts we see here. Certainly sounds like my type of a dog these
> days.<G>
> Love him and be happy he isn't tearing your house apart and barking
> and peeing 24/7. And if you really don't like his type temperament,
> then next time make sure you go for a wild puppy in a litter from wild
> and energectic parents.
> Liz

Hang on a minute: it's perfectly "fair" to expect and anticipate that a
given breed of dog will act in a manner consistent with the known traits
of that breed!

In other words, if one is to "compare" one dog to another, it's done
largely within the scope of the traits for which that breed is known. In
this case, it's a Labrador Retriever, which is a breed famous for, well,
retrieving. . .

So, to compare two dogs on that basis is doing no harm. It doesn't mean
that the new puppy will be any less loved.

rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Elizabet » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 00:40:52




Quote:


>> This/your case is a perfect example of NOT trying to get another dog
>> just like old ----.
>> To even begin to compare him is so unfair to the new pup I cannot tell
>> you.
>> Every dog is different. Every line is different. You must not expect
>> your new puppy to do anything your old dog did. He's a new little
>> being. Don't judge him by your old dog. Encourage him in what he is
>> good at. Feel him out gradually. Actually he sounds like the kind of
>> dog most of the world would like these days according to some of the
>> posts we see here. Certainly sounds like my type of a dog these
>> days.<G>
>> Love him and be happy he isn't tearing your house apart and barking
>> and peeing 24/7. And if you really don't like his type temperament,
>> then next time make sure you go for a wild puppy in a litter from wild
>> and energectic parents.
>> Liz

>Hang on a minute: it's perfectly "fair" to expect and anticipate that a
>given breed of dog will act in a manner consistent with the known traits
>of that breed!

>In other words, if one is to "compare" one dog to another, it's done
>largely within the scope of the traits for which that breed is known. In
>this case, it's a Labrador Retriever, which is a breed famous for, well,
>retrieving. . .

>So, to compare two dogs on that basis is doing no harm. It doesn't mean
>that the new puppy will be any less loved.

>rick

I'm sure you "will" love him Rick - or at least I hope so, but I
wanted to point out - since this "is" a discussion group, that it's
never fair to a new pup to compare it to an older recently deceased
dog. And many, many do - according to letters we have had here over
the years. We have actually had people ask for mix breeds with spots
on their bodies in certain places "just like old Suzie"
Now, expecting Labs to be as their heritage might imply, is something
else again. The majority bred these days have not come from stock who
have a heavy retrieving background. They have been bred for pets for
generations, and while they might "look" like a Lab, again the
majority will not know what to do when presented with a object to
retrieve or put in a field situation. When one wishes for this kind of
a dog, then it's better to seek out breeders who have a very strong
field background with their dogs - as well as a show background if you
like a certain look to your dog also. It's the same in many breeds and
much to the lament of some who feel the show people should also stay
with that which the particular breed was meant to do.  I can't say I'd
go along with that since the average very alert, on the go, highly
birdy dog, might not be the perfect companion dog for most. However I
sincerely do admire those who have wonderful show dogs and who also
put titles on them according to that for which they were originally
bred - and that has increased enormously in the last few years.
If you feel that this puppy isn't really going to work for you, I
suggest finding him a home - maybe with an older couple who appreciate
so much this kind of a dog. A wild home with children doesn't sound
like his type of a home by what you tell me. Quiet laid back puppies
stress enormously when faced with large loud and wild families.
Then I'd start looking for someone who is breeding dogs who are pretty
birdy. You might find an older pup  who didn't quite have what it took
to be a good field dog, but might suit you perfectly.
I have no doubt that your hear is in the right place since dogs are
obviously a large and involved part of your life, but if this little
guy doesn't look like the type of boy you will have lots of fun with,
then I'd place him and start again. I know people always say that a
dog is a forever commitment, but I'd rather think that mistakes can be
rectified and would be happier for all concerned. It's not your fault
- or his, but see to it now before he's too much older and you are he
are too bonded.
Liz
 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Nancy Holmes or Nelson Ruffi » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 01:15:16



snip

Quote:

> Hang on a minute: it's perfectly "fair" to expect and anticipate that a
> given breed of dog will act in a manner consistent with the known traits
> of that breed!

Not unless you tested the litter for that particular quality.
Were the parents of this pup big on playing fetch?
Were the pups in the litter given play time and taught to play fetch?

snip
So some suggestions for you :-)
To get a dog interested in playing a game with you like this first you find
out what the pup did have for toys or if that is not possible try out a
bunch of different things to see what the pup likes to play with best - a
branch, a paper tube from paper towels, a rolled up sock, a squeaky toy, a
tennis ball that has been buried in a bag of dog food for long enough to get
scented with it, a *** toy, a bone, a ball with a bell in it, a bumper (as
in field dog training bumpers :-) etc
Once you find something the pup is interested in encourage the pup to play
with it. Throw a short distance and reward the pup even if it goes to sniff
the toy (praise with or without a treat will work). Be enthusiastic and
don't throw the item very far (young pups who have not been taught to do it
won't be able to track an item on  a far throw) and praise the pup like it
gave you a winning lottery ticket :-) for even showing interest in the game
with you. Once you teach the game with one toy moving on to others is pretty
easy.
10 week old pups do sleep a lot still. Enjoy this time - the supercharged
energy months are coming :-)
Nancy

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Lea » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 02:08:14


Quote:


>I have a Black Lab/Border Collie that could care less about toys, usually.
>Sometimes he'll go get the ball when you throw it.  Other times, he just
>looks at it and then looks at you like, "You threw it, you go get it."

My Eskie was the same way.  The best we could hope for, when throwing a ball,
was that he'd "tag" it.  That is, run after it, touch it with his paws, then
lose interest.

But more often, we'd get the same look as you described. :}

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Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by rick » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 05:36:47


Quote:
> If you feel that this puppy isn't really going to work for you, I
> suggest finding him a home - maybe with an older couple who appreciate
> so much this kind of a dog. A wild home with children doesn't sound
> like his type of a home by what you tell me. Quiet laid back puppies
> stress enormously when faced with large loud and wild families.
> Then I'd start looking for someone who is breeding dogs who are pretty
> birdy. You might find an older pup  who didn't quite have what it took
> to be a good field dog, but might suit you perfectly.
> I have no doubt that your hear is in the right place since dogs are
> obviously a large and involved part of your life, but if this little
> guy doesn't look like the type of boy you will have lots of fun with,
> then I'd place him and start again. I know people always say that a
> dog is a forever commitment, but I'd rather think that mistakes can be
> rectified and would be happier for all concerned. It's not your fault
> - or his, but see to it now before he's too much older and you are he
> are too bonded.
> Liz

Maybe I didn't do a good job of explaining:

I'm going to keep this dog whether he's got the aptitude or not.
In truth, it's not _that_ important to me, since I don't hunt. But
because we enjoy excercise and outdoor activities, we like to involve
the dogs; it just makes it more fun for everybody (including the dogs.)

Even if the new dog --Martin-- doesn't have the Lab gift for fetching,
he'll fit right in, since he can walk and run. ; - )

The main thrust of my post was not to imply that I'm unhappy with this
dog. Instead, it's about getting useful information in a discussion type
of forum, where people would share their experiences, and possibly
assist me in getting my new guy pointed in what I perceive to be the
right direction.

While I'm certain that there are people who would prefer to "trade in"
the non-performing dog for a newer model, I'm not one of them. We'll be
perfectly happy either way. And so will our new family member.

I'm also sure that there _are_ people in the world who would prefer that
their new dog have the same spots -- literally -- as the old dog. To me,
that's a form of pathological behavior, bordering on what some would
call an emotional illness. But I doubt that it's the norm. It certainly
isn't applicable in this case.

In short, all I wanted was some feedback on how to possibly get a Lab
Puppy interested in chasing stuff. Again, it's possible that I didn't
provide enough information initially.

rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Tricia99 » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 05:51:23


Rick:

Some dogs don't kick in with this interest as early as others. I can't tell you
the numbers of people who have said "My new pup isn't interested in retrieving
like previous dogs." Then, a couple of months later, the dog is ball crazy and
loves a great game of fetch. Don't give up hope. These things evolve at
different times with different dogs.

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Manade » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 06:09:49


Quote:

>In other words, if one is to "compare" one dog to another, it's done
>largely within the scope of the traits for which that breed is known. In
>this case, it's a Labrador Retriever, which is a breed famous for, well,
>retrieving. . .

That's true, in a very broad context.  What I hear you saying is "this puppy
isn't at all like my old Lab".  That, in and of itself, shows that you are
setting yourself up for failure.  The relationship that we have with individual
dogs is based on much more than physical appearance or breed traits.


<<Anyway, In comparing him to my now-departed and much beloved Black Lab,
I'm finding significant differences. For one thing, the new pup doesn't
appear interested in chasing a ball or a stick. I've tried a number of
times to get him into it, but he generally doesn't respond. There have
been a few cases in which he's gone after a small *** ball, but he
then just kind of forgets about it, and doesn't retrieve it.>>

This statement is about a 10 week old puppy that you've owned for a week.  Not
to flame, but IMO, you are being more than a little bit unfair to the little
guy.

Yes, he's a Lab, but there are always different personalities, different levels
of ability and drive.

I'm curious.  In interviewing with your puppy's breeder, what did they tell you
when you told them that you wanted a very active, ball crazy dog that could
keep up with you and your family?  I have to wonder about anyone that would
place a laid back puppy in that situation.  A good breeder would have either
picked out the puppy best suited to your needs, or, if they didn't have it,
referred you elsewhere.

Robin

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by E. L. Ryan & C » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 08:14:02


I can relate to that!  As I have mentioned before on this NG, I got Jedda at
7 1/2 months.  Being a field spaniel x springer spaniel I had read that they
like to retrieve and carry things around in their mouths.  So, I bought some
toys for her.  No luck.  She was scared of the squeaky, bumpy, yellow ball
so I removed the squeak and the tennis ball was also less than appealing.  I
found a toy wombat (ex-olympic memorabilia) that I had handled alot.  She
would chase that around.  Then all of a sudden about a month and a half
after getting her she started going MENTAL for the aforementioned bumpy,
yellow ball.

All it took was time.  Jedda just LOVES playing fetch now, even if I do have
to chase her around and then stick my fingers in her mouth to get the ball
back!  Oh, well, it's all part of the game!

Michelle & Jedda (who is snoring gently at my feet)


Quote:
> Rick:

> Some dogs don't kick in with this interest as early as others. I can't
tell you
> the numbers of people who have said "My new pup isn't interested in
retrieving
> like previous dogs." Then, a couple of months later, the dog is ball crazy
and
> loves a great game of fetch. Don't give up hope. These things evolve at
> different times with different dogs.

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Andrea Ston » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 08:42:20


Yep, entirely possible. Some dogs just aren't that into toys and such.

And, as you pointed out, you just got him, and he's still very young. He
might decide at some point toys are fun. But he might not. Don't push him,
just have some fun at those things he does like.

--
Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis

"The average dog is a nicer person than the average person."
-- Andrew A. Rooney


<snip>

Quote:
> I'm just wondering whether it's possible that this Lab just isn't as
> genetically wired to do this Lab stuff.

<snip>
 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Marla Belzowsk » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 12:21:15


rick,

I think he's a bit young and going through "shell shock" to be really
rambunctious.
10 to 11 weeks is typically a fear period and often pups are reserved during
this time.
Don't worry about it.  Give it to 16 weeks and he'll be a little "hel*ion".
Promise.

Here's a nice site on puppy development for you.  If you haven't had a pup
in a while, you may have
forgotten just how much of "lumps" they are at the start.  It's when they
are in the 16 week stage that your ready to give them back.

here you go..
http://users.bigpond.com/winron/criticalstages.htm

I think your first post was a bit vague... but we're catching up with you
now...

Cheers,

Marla Belzowski
& the LegendHold Collie Clan


Quote:

> > If you feel that this puppy isn't really going to work for you, I
> > suggest finding him a home - maybe with an older couple who appreciate
> > so much this kind of a dog. A wild home with children doesn't sound
> > like his type of a home by what you tell me. Quiet laid back puppies
> > stress enormously when faced with large loud and wild families.
> > Then I'd start looking for someone who is breeding dogs who are pretty
> > birdy. You might find an older pup  who didn't quite have what it took
> > to be a good field dog, but might suit you perfectly.
> > I have no doubt that your hear is in the right place since dogs are
> > obviously a large and involved part of your life, but if this little
> > guy doesn't look like the type of boy you will have lots of fun with,
> > then I'd place him and start again. I know people always say that a
> > dog is a forever commitment, but I'd rather think that mistakes can be
> > rectified and would be happier for all concerned. It's not your fault
> > - or his, but see to it now before he's too much older and you are he
> > are too bonded.
> > Liz

> Maybe I didn't do a good job of explaining:

> I'm going to keep this dog whether he's got the aptitude or not.
> In truth, it's not _that_ important to me, since I don't hunt. But
> because we enjoy excercise and outdoor activities, we like to involve
> the dogs; it just makes it more fun for everybody (including the dogs.)

> Even if the new dog --Martin-- doesn't have the Lab gift for fetching,
> he'll fit right in, since he can walk and run. ; - )

> The main thrust of my post was not to imply that I'm unhappy with this
> dog. Instead, it's about getting useful information in a discussion type
> of forum, where people would share their experiences, and possibly
> assist me in getting my new guy pointed in what I perceive to be the
> right direction.

> While I'm certain that there are people who would prefer to "trade in"
> the non-performing dog for a newer model, I'm not one of them. We'll be
> perfectly happy either way. And so will our new family member.

> I'm also sure that there _are_ people in the world who would prefer that
> their new dog have the same spots -- literally -- as the old dog. To me,
> that's a form of pathological behavior, bordering on what some would
> call an emotional illness. But I doubt that it's the norm. It certainly
> isn't applicable in this case.

> In short, all I wanted was some feedback on how to possibly get a Lab
> Puppy interested in chasing stuff. Again, it's possible that I didn't
> provide enough information initially.

> rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by April McCre » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 15:39:45


I have a dalmatian that is NOTHING at all like people say the breed is. She
is a couch potato (no she isn't fat). She hates to be outside. She doesn't
like to run much. Every dog is different. :-)


Quote:
> I have a Black Lab/Border Collie that could care less about toys, usually.
> Sometimes he'll go get the ball when you throw it.  Other times, he just
> looks at it and then looks at you like, "You threw it, you go get it."
Some
> dogs are just crazy about toys and others aren't.  I couldn't tell you how
> to make them that way.  I've got a Chihuahua/Terrier (?) mix that is nuts
> about toys, but my Boxer tops them all on love for toys.  None of my other
> Boxers in all my life had any interest in them.

> Maybe your pup will never have an interest in that.  Like Liz K said, just
> love your puppy :O)  If he's a couch potato, so be it.  Plus, he's just a
> pup...maybe he'll grow into toys or something.  Try getting ones that make
> noise, those seem to work best at getting their attention (even if it's
only
> for a short time).

> Mali



> > I recently brought home a 10 week old Yellow Lab Pup. He's a beauty.

> > Anyway, In comparing him to my now-departed and much beloved Black Lab,
> > I'm finding significant differences. For one thing, the new pup doesn't
> > appear interested in chasing a ball or a stick. I've tried a number of
> > times to get him into it, but he generally doesn't respond. There have
> > been a few cases in which he's gone after a small *** ball, but he
> > then just kind of forgets about it, and doesn't retrieve it.

> > Again, my Black Lab was enthusiastic and energetic at this point. He
> > chased anything that I threw, and brought it back immediately (for
> > another round.)

> > Further, my Yellow Lab doesn't look interested in much of anything.
> > He's sleeping quite a bit, and is not very animated when awake. The Vets
> > say that he's in great shape, and he's been checked for worms and stuff.

> > I'm just wondering whether it's possible that this Lab just isn't as
> > genetically wired to do this Lab stuff. By the way, he has excellent
> > lineage, but his parents weren't field dogs.

> > I'm not into hunting; my lab will never go "into the field" per se. But
> > I do excercise my dogs by throwing balls, sticks, frisbees, etc. I take
> > them to swim fairly often, and I like them to be enthusiastic about
> > playtime, as it keeps them in great shape. We have a Golden Retiever who
> > is very gung ho; the Yellow Lab just watches him, and doesn't want to
> > get involved.

> > Now, it's worth mentioning that I've only had this guy for a week, or
so.
> > It's possible that he's just getting used to the new gig. My guess is
> > that he'll come around, in time.

> > But I'm interested in hearing what you have to say regarding these
> > matters. If you have useful feedback, then I'm all ears.

> > rick

 
 
 

Need advice/help w/ Yellow Lab Puppy

Post by Sally Hennesse » Wed, 21 Mar 2001 21:38:05




Quote:
>I have a dalmatian that is NOTHING at all like people say the breed is. She
>is a couch potato (no she isn't fat). She hates to be outside. She doesn't
>like to run much. Every dog is different. :-)

But, again, you should be aware that it's your Dal that's unusual.
People don't just "say" the breed is high energy.  I pulled just a few
Dal books off my shelf and got the following descriptions: "extremely
energetic", "very active", "require a great deal of exercise...don't
adjust well to confined or sedentary living".  This isn't the way
"people say" the breed is; it's breed normally IS.  People aren't
making this stuff up.

Sally Hennessey