Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

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Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by ve » Thu, 25 Feb 1999 04:00:00



I'm a first time dog owner and I just adopted a 2 yr old GSD.  He's
got a fantastic disposition.  Very friendly, and wants to play w/
everyone, and likes other dogs.

I've only had him 3 days and we're still getting to know each other.
We had our first training class last night.  He was a handful.  Didn't
pay much attention to me, but wanted to meet and play w/ everyone else
and smell everything else so was constantly tugging on the leash.  He
then got frustrated and started chewing the leash. The trainer put a
Halti collar on him and he definitely calmed down (after trying to get
it off).

He's got a sweet disposition and listens fairly well when we're alone
in the house.

But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.

We were out practicing sit/down/stand at lunchtime, and went back in.
He started whining so I thought he had to go.  We went back out and it
turns out he wanted to play tug-of-war again w/ the leash (growling
and pulling).  I tried the loud "No!" to no avail (sometimes works),
and a quick tug on the ***collar.  This did nothing so I quietly
turned and walked back into the house and he followed me.  (I'm in the
process of fencing in my backyard, so I can't just drop the leash and
ignore him yet.)  He thinks he's playing, so I don't want to be harsh
to him.  He hasn't done anything wrong in his eyes, right?

What should I do in the future if he does this?  I can go inside the
house in my backyard, but what if we're in public?  His previous owners
definitely played tug-of-war w/ him and his original leash was frayed
from him tugging.  He's off leash in the house.  Should I always keep
him on the leash even at home to get him used to it?  Will it be easier
to break him of it while he's in the house?

Thanks for any insight you can provide!

Rgds,
Vel Natarajan &
Austin the GSD

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by Robert Cr » Thu, 25 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Vel, get you and Austin into a training class right away.  Sounds like
neither of you have been to doggie school yet.  Just because he is 2
years old doesn't mean he has two years of training/experience behind
him.

Now for the fun part.  He obviously has been at this chewing the leash
game for quite a while and has learned to win it.  What you have to do
is fix it so winning isn't fun.  Get a big bottle of "Bitter Apple"
and soak the leash in it for a couple of hours.  Use a plastic bag,
like you would marinate stuff for cooking in.  Pull out the leash and
wipe it off.  Then take Austin out for a walk.  

The first time he grabs the leash for his game, you should see a
marked difference in his demeanor.   Ignore his pawing and drooling,
it's just because the bitter apple is soooo very bitter.  Just go for
your walk-a-bout and pretend nothing has changed.  Repeat the soaking
when necessary.

Wanna know what he is tasting that is so bad?  Touch the end of your
tongue to part of the leash.  Bleeeegh!!!  Spit, spit, spit!!!  I
know, 'cause I tried it.  I had a dog that just loved to grab the
newspaper and make mulch out of it before I could get to it.  So I got
a squeeze bottle of Bitter Apple and soaked the Sunday paper before he
could get to it and just left it in the yard for him.  He grabbed it,
but didn't want to play with it.  I did it again with the Monday
paper, and the Tuesday paper. By the Thursday paper, he didn't want
anything to do with it.

Same principle applies to the leash.

Robert
If you can't find Bitter Apple, hot sauce works pretty well too, but
it has a lot of aroma.


Quote:
>I'm a first time dog owner and I just adopted a 2 yr old GSD.  He's
>got a fantastic disposition.  Very friendly, and wants to play w/
>everyone, and likes other dogs.

>I've only had him 3 days and we're still getting to know each other.
>We had our first training class last night.  He was a handful.  Didn't
>pay much attention to me, but wanted to meet and play w/ everyone else
>and smell everything else so was constantly tugging on the leash.  He
>then got frustrated and started chewing the leash. The trainer put a
>Halti collar on him and he definitely calmed down (after trying to get
>it off).

>He's got a sweet disposition and listens fairly well when we're alone
>in the house.

>But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
>tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
>grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
>will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.

>We were out practicing sit/down/stand at lunchtime, and went back in.
>He started whining so I thought he had to go.  We went back out and it
>turns out he wanted to play tug-of-war again w/ the leash (growling
>and pulling).  I tried the loud "No!" to no avail (sometimes works),
>and a quick tug on the ***collar.  This did nothing so I quietly
>turned and walked back into the house and he followed me.  (I'm in the
>process of fencing in my backyard, so I can't just drop the leash and
>ignore him yet.)  He thinks he's playing, so I don't want to be harsh
>to him.  He hasn't done anything wrong in his eyes, right?

>What should I do in the future if he does this?  I can go inside the
>house in my backyard, but what if we're in public?  His previous owners
>definitely played tug-of-war w/ him and his original leash was frayed
>from him tugging.  He's off leash in the house.  Should I always keep
>him on the leash even at home to get him used to it?  Will it be easier
>to break him of it while he's in the house?

>Thanks for any insight you can provide!

>Rgds,
>Vel Natarajan &
>Austin the GSD

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by Suz » Thu, 25 Feb 1999 04:00:00


I had a golden who like to  play, chew, pull on the leash and my hands
during training or anytime she was on a leash.  I put tobasco sauce or
bitter apple on her leash (soaked it!).  I've known people who have done
this or similar things and were successful.   For us however, it didn't
work that well.  She liked to eat everything!!!!  (Still does.....) and the
bad or hot taste didn't appear to phase her. (The other theory was she was
just to stupid to understand, gotta love  them goldens :)
Quote:

> I'm a first time dog owner and I just adopted a 2 yr old GSD.  He's
> got a fantastic disposition.  Very friendly, and wants to play w/
> everyone, and likes other dogs.

> I've only had him 3 days and we're still getting to know each other.
> We had our first training class last night.  He was a handful.  Didn't
> pay much attention to me, but wanted to meet and play w/ everyone else
> and smell everything else so was constantly tugging on the leash.  He
> then got frustrated and started chewing the leash. The trainer put a
> Halti collar on him and he definitely calmed down (after trying to get
> it off).

> He's got a sweet disposition and listens fairly well when we're alone
> in the house.

> But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
> tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
> grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
> will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.

> We were out practicing sit/down/stand at lunchtime, and went back in.
> He started whining so I thought he had to go.  We went back out and it
> turns out he wanted to play tug-of-war again w/ the leash (growling
> and pulling).  I tried the loud "No!" to no avail (sometimes works),
> and a quick tug on the ***collar.  This did nothing so I quietly
> turned and walked back into the house and he followed me.  (I'm in the
> process of fencing in my backyard, so I can't just drop the leash and
> ignore him yet.)  He thinks he's playing, so I don't want to be harsh
> to him.  He hasn't done anything wrong in his eyes, right?

> What should I do in the future if he does this?  I can go inside the
> house in my backyard, but what if we're in public?  His previous owners
> definitely played tug-of-war w/ him and his original leash was frayed
> from him tugging.  He's off leash in the house.  Should I always keep
> him on the leash even at home to get him used to it?  Will it be easier
> to break him of it while he's in the house?

> Thanks for any insight you can provide!

> Rgds,
> Vel Natarajan &
> Austin the GSD

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by Chris Kosmak » Thu, 25 Feb 1999 04:00:00


: But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
: tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
: grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
: will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.

Congratulations on your newly adopted dog.  He sounds like a happy boy.
You're absolutely right in not coming down *** him or making an
issue out of his favorite game, just 3 days after adopting him.  You both
need some adjustment time.  I would suggest you get a much shorter lead
to walk him on, and simply avoid the problem until the two of you learn
other ways to play together.

Lynn K.
--

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by AVRAMA GINGO » Thu, 25 Feb 1999 04:00:00


He initiates tug of war and you don't want to play.  Simple:
you say NO!  He drops lead in surprise, you inform him that
he is the greatest thing since chopped liver.

After he has urinated and defecated, you go back into the
house, and start contacting the owners of well behaved
dogs, and your vet, to get the address of an obedience
class.  You contact trainer, and sign up.  GSDs are great
obedience dogs.

I have a middle of the road position on tug-of-war.  If
you already are pack leader, then it can be fun.  Shomer,
for example, will not chase balls (altho he has CAUGHT
pigeons in the park) and seldom plays with toys, so I
am happy to play tug of war with him.  It gives him a
good deal of pleasure (me too), and after a couple of
minutes, I say "enough" and he stops.  However, should
he not drop it when I say so, tug-of-war would be a thing
of the past.

I'd hesitate to play it with a new dog.  Later, it can
join your collection of games.

Meanwhile, for fun, go to obedience classes and teach your
GSD to heel.

avrama & shomer

.. nfx v2.7 [C0000] Our dogs--may we deserve them!                          

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by black.. » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


: I'm a first time dog owner and I just adopted a 2 yr old GSD.  He's
: got a fantastic disposition.  Very friendly, and wants to play w/
: everyone, and likes other dogs.

: I've only had him 3 days and we're still getting to know each other.
: We had our first training class last night.  He was a handful.  Didn't

Only three days and already you have started training.  Good for you!
I wish more people did that.  Most never train at all, and half those that
do wait until problems are bad.  You are off to a great start.

: pay much attention to me, but wanted to meet and play w/ everyone else

Well you haven't been together long enough yet for him to be really
bonded.  Don't worry - you will get there.

: and smell everything else so was constantly tugging on the leash.  He
: then got frustrated and started chewing the leash. The trainer put a
: Halti collar on him and he definitely calmed down (after trying to get
: it off).

OK so the Halti worked for you.  Did you have to leave it behind or did
you get to take it home?

: He's got a sweet disposition and listens fairly well when we're alone
: in the house.

In three day?  Great!

: But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
: tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
: grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
: will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.

Good idea

: We were out practicing sit/down/stand at lunchtime, and went back in.
: He started whining so I thought he had to go.  We went back out and it
: turns out he wanted to play tug-of-war again w/ the leash (growling
: and pulling).  I tried the loud "No!" to no avail (sometimes works),

He probably won't understand "No" right away.  He will be reacting more
to your body language and tone of voice.  

: and a quick tug on the ***collar.  This did nothing so I quietly
: turned and walked back into the house and he followed me.  (I'm in the

YES! good instincts.  That is exactly right.  BUT do get that fencing
fixed so you can do that safely.

: process of fencing in my backyard, so I can't just drop the leash and
: ignore him yet.)  He thinks he's playing, so I don't want to be harsh
: to him.  He hasn't done anything wrong in his eyes, right?

Correct.  And while that doesn't mean you let him "get away with it" it
does mean selecting a different style.  It takes quite a bit of practice
to use a slip (choke) collar properly.  Some people never master it.
I recommend that for walks away from the house you use the Halti or some
other style of head halter.  That should make it fairly easy for you to
stop him from tugging.  Good timing will help as well.  The idea in
correcting unwanted behavior is to stop it before the dog has the chance
to derive any pleasure of it.  In short stop the dog for even "thinking"
of tugging on the leash.  How?  Well you will have to vary it depending
upon your dog.  Watch the dog carefully.  You will be able to see the
little perk of interest in the leash.  When you see that give the dog
something else to do and catch his interest with a high voice. "Hey, let's
go" and turn and go the other direction - or have him sit, or bounce a
ball in front of him.

If you are using the head halter you probably won't need this but consider
using two short leashes (the advantage of a big dog) leave one loose and
hold the other.  If he grabs the one you are holding let go, grab the
other, and turn and walk the other way.

: What should I do in the future if he does this?  I can go inside the
: house in my backyard, but what if we're in public?  His previous owners
: definitely played tug-of-war w/ him and his original leash was frayed
: from him tugging.  He's off leash in the house.  Should I always keep
: him on the leash even at home to get him used to it?  Will it be easier
: to break him of it while he's in the house?

Tethering is a method of helping not only housetrain a dog but build
bonding with a dog.  Its kind of a pain at first but you quickly get used
to it.  It involves attaching the dog to you as much of the time as you
can tolerate then just going about your business.  No need to warn the dog
when you are going to move let him keep his eye on you and figure it out.
With the leash tugging habit this may be a bit more difficult than usual.
I would do it only with the head halter unless you can get some special
help on correct use of the slip collar.  The same rules apply, however, if
he wants to play tug don't say anything to him - reject him - ostracise
him, walk away - let your body say not that you are angry, but that the
game does not interest you and you just don't want to play.  The second he
drops the leash give him a reward that means something.  Toss a toy, let
him give you a kiss, praise.

Daily grooming and massage will also help in the bonding.

I'm very impressed that you are actually practicing what you have learned
in training class.  I'm sure most instructors are much more used to
students that don't practice and aren't honest about it.  Keep up the good
work.  Several short sessions a day beat one longer session.  

Good luck

Diane Blackman

-     -    -    -    -    -    -    -     -
"Anytime we set about changing behavior because someone else things we
should, we start out at a tremendous disadvantage. . . . if any aspect of
the definition strikes us as untrue .  .  . our chances of effecting any
permanent changes plummet.  "The Body Language and Emotion of Dogs" by
Myrna M. Milani, DVM.

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by L » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


my dog loves to*** anything with bitter apple on it. honest!
instead, i soaked the leash in the hottest hot sauce i could find. he
chewed it once after that. once.

L.
________
Lincoln Stewart
Alien Tomato
http://www.moonsgarden.com/

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by black.. » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


: my dog loves to*** anything with bitter apple on it. honest!
: instead, i soaked the leash in the hottest hot sauce i could find. he
: chewed it once after that. once.

And my dog loves hot sauce - hotter than I can eat it. :-)  Jut proves the
rule - different things work for different dogs.

Diane Blackman  

Companion of Tanith and Oso; Nox, Yoda, Lady Greystoke
and Mr. Doublestuff
_  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _
You must speak to be heard.

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by star chave » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


ANd my dog seems to love jalapenos! SO dropped one once and dog snapped it
up quick. Now, he throws them to Sid and Sid catches them in mid-air.
But then he***s his lips for an hour after so however much he may like
them, SO is not allowed to give them when I am around as I feel hot pepper
empathy pains.

CHeers, Cin & Sid (the king boss doberboyX, 3 yo--waiting for a sister)


Quote:

> : my dog loves to*** anything with bitter apple on it. honest!
> : instead, i soaked the leash in the hottest hot sauce i could find. he
> : chewed it once after that. once.

> And my dog loves hot sauce - hotter than I can eat it. :-)  Jut proves the
> rule - different things work for different dogs.

> Diane Blackman  

> Companion of Tanith and Oso; Nox, Yoda, Lady Greystoke
> and Mr. Doublestuff
> _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _
> You must speak to be heard.

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by ve » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>: pay much attention to me, but wanted to meet and play w/ everyone else
>Well you haven't been together long enough yet for him to be really
>bonded.  Don't worry - you will get there.

That's what I was hoping.  Thanks.

Quote:
>OK so the Halti worked for you.  Did you have to leave it behind or did
>you get to take it home?

I got to take the Halti home.  I haven't used it since the class.  (He
was miserable when it was on.  He went *** for a while then tried
to get it off).  But he did listen better!

Quote:
>: But my problem is when we go out on leash, he wants to play by playing
>: tug-of-war with the leash.  He will also try to "reel" the leash by
>: grabbing a portion of the leash close to my hand.  I'm nervous that he
>: will bite me, but most importantly, I want to break him of this habit.
>Good idea

I tried the bitter apple on the leash, but he liked it!  But hot sauce
worked.

Quote:
>: He started whining so I thought he had to go.  We went back out and it
>: turns out he wanted to play tug-of-war again w/ the leash (growling
>: and pulling).  I tried the loud "No!" to no avail (sometimes works),
>He probably won't understand "No" right away.  He will be reacting more
>to your body language and tone of voice.  

He does know "No" in other circumstances, but I think he's so e***d
to be outside and playing, that he just doesn't listen and wants to
play.  (He play growls, wags his tail, gets down low w/ his ***in
the air, lunges for the leash -- AARGH! it gets frustrating.).  

Quote:
>: and a quick tug on the ***collar.  This did nothing so I quietly
>: turned and walked back into the house and he followed me.  (I'm in the
>YES! good instincts.  That is exactly right.  BUT do get that fencing
>fixed so you can do that safely.

I can't get it done soon enough!  It will be great to just "let him out"
in the morning to relieve himself instead of bundling up and taking
him on lead.  But also, it will be great to be able to throw a ball
and have him fetch it without being on a lead and me running after him
towards the ball as I do now - looks pretty silly.

Quote:
>: process of fencing in my backyard, so I can't just drop the leash and
>: ignore him yet.)  He thinks he's playing, so I don't want to be harsh
>: to him.  He hasn't done anything wrong in his eyes, right?
>Correct.  And while that doesn't mean you let him "get away with it" it
>does mean selecting a different style.  It takes quite a bit of practice
>to use a slip (choke) collar properly.  Some people never master it.

That's why I'm afraid of doing it incorrectly.  Jerk, then praise when
he listens?

Quote:
>I recommend that for walks away from the house you use the Halti or some
>other style of head halter.  That should make it fairly easy for you to
>stop him from tugging.  Good timing will help as well.  The idea in
>correcting unwanted behavior is to stop it before the dog has the chance
>to derive any pleasure of it.  In short stop the dog for even "thinking"
>of tugging on the leash.  How?  Well you will have to vary it depending
>upon your dog.  Watch the dog carefully.  You will be able to see the
>little perk of interest in the leash.  When you see that give the dog
>something else to do and catch his interest with a high voice. "Hey, let's
>go" and turn and go the other direction - or have him sit, or bounce a
>ball in front of him.

In fact, the "lets go" seems to work some of the time when he tugs on
the leash.  He drops it and runs with me.  (but it doesn't work all
the time -- sometimes he will run w/ it in his mouth and go for the
part of the leash near my hand).  He once came very close and I yelled
"OW!" and turned around to ignore him.  He came around to my frontside
and calmed a bit.  I think he's learning.

Quote:
>: What should I do in the future if he does this?  I can go inside the
>: house in my backyard, but what if we're in public?  His previous owners
>: definitely played tug-of-war w/ him and his original leash was frayed
>: from him tugging.  He's off leash in the house.  Should I always keep
>: him on the leash even at home to get him used to it?  Will it be easier
>: to break him of it while he's in the house?
>Tethering is a method of helping not only housetrain a dog but build
>bonding with a dog.  Its kind of a pain at first but you quickly get used
>to it.  It involves attaching the dog to you as much of the time as you
>can tolerate then just going about your business.  No need to warn the dog
>when you are going to move let him keep his eye on you and figure it out.
>With the leash tugging habit this may be a bit more difficult than usual.

Inside the house, he's great.  I tried tethering a little the first
day, but will do it regularly now so he stays with me and watches me.

Quote:
>I would do it only with the head halter unless you can get some special
>help on correct use of the slip collar.  The same rules apply, however, if
>he wants to play tug don't say anything to him - reject him - ostracise
>him, walk away - let your body say not that you are angry, but that the
>game does not interest you and you just don't want to play.  The second he
>drops the leash give him a reward that means something.  Toss a toy, let
>him give you a kiss, praise.

I will try it that way.  Thanks.

Quote:
>Daily grooming and massage will also help in the bonding.

The past few nights before I go to bed, we've spent about 10-15.
minutes with me just petting and stroking him and touching him all
over (ears, head, paws), and massaging him while he lays by me.  I can
see he's feeling more comfortable being close to me.  I'll have to try
the brush on him this weekend.

Quote:
>I'm very impressed that you are actually practicing what you have learned
>in training class.  I'm sure most instructors are much more used to
>students that don't practice and aren't honest about it.  Keep up the good
>work.  Several short sessions a day beat one longer session.  

Thanks.  That's because I really want a well-behaved dog that bonds
with me.  Plus, it's FUN seeing the light go on in his head when he
associates sitting with getting his food, going out, etc.  The hard
part is always being patient and learning how to communicate with him
and read his signals and then know the proper action to take to
enforce, or discourage a particular behavior! :-)

Rgds,
Vel

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by ve » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>: my dog loves to*** anything with bitter apple on it. honest!
>: instead, i soaked the leash in the hottest hot sauce i could find. he
>: chewed it once after that. once.
>And my dog loves hot sauce - hotter than I can eat it. :-)  Jut proves the
>rule - different things work for different dogs.

I tried the bitter apple as some had suggested.  He LOVED it!  He
methodically***ed the leash from one end to the other.  I took a glob
of it from the bottle and***ed it myself.  It wasn't bitter at all!  This
was the "Extra bitter formula" in the Gel form.  Maybe the Petroleum
Jelly in the Gel form hides the bitterness.

So I tried washed it, and then put some Melinda's XXXtra Hot Habanero
sauce (Which I love).  I let him sniff it, and then he took a***.
"Snort!  Hmmphf!"  That stopped any***ing!  (and hopefully any
tug-of-war!)

Vel

 
 
 

Help needed w/ new dog (new owner)

Post by Kris Engele » Fri, 26 Feb 1999 04:00:00


I just love it when a person like Diane takes the time to read through all
these long, detailed postings and always gives clever answers !
Dog lovers are GOOD people, isn't it ?

Kris
http://members.xoom.com/Am_Cocker