Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

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Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Terr » Thu, 22 Apr 1999 04:00:00



My dog loves to chew and eat street garbage so I always keep a good eye on
her.
So I'm walking my beagle tonight, just like any other night... I see her
about 30 meters ahead of me chewing and eating something... I call her over
and she drags this long thing over.  Immediately, I yelled at her for
picking up garbage again and instinctively she took off ahead again.

I walked up to the object she had been chewing and eating, and guess what it
was?
It was another dog's feces!!!!

I was absolutely shocked and angry!!!  Thoughts of me play fighting with her
and having my hand in her mouth (suddenly) made me feel sick.

My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?
I mean, before tonight, I have never seen this type of behaviour from my
dog.  Usually, when she sees another dog's poo, she just sniffs at it and
then leaves it as is.  She is a year and two months old now.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.  Please reply to the newsgroup.
Thanks in advance.

Terry

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Erik H. Hofmeiste » Thu, 22 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

   This, to me, is The Big Question.  My research colleagues and I
postulate that it's an abnormal behavior, but we have to do more research
to evaluate it.  I encourage you to check out my website on the topic at:
http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/pets/study.htm

Erik "Rouleaux" Hofmeister
WSU Class '00

PLEASE NOTE: In the absence of a traditional veterinarian-client-patient
relationship, this information should be taken as a friendly opinion, not
as an official clinical recommendation.  Also realize that I am a veterinary
student, and anything stated should be taken with that in mind.

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Ron Hardi » Thu, 22 Apr 1999 04:00:00


My favorite dog catalog ad is for a diet additive that is said
to ``give feces an unpleasant taste.''
--
Ron Hardin

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Carol E Kaniewsk » Thu, 22 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

Completely!
Although you will want to make sure to have a stool sample checked at your
Vet for worms....

Carol

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Elaine Gallan » Thu, 22 Apr 1999 04:00:00


 It's common for Beagles to eat feces. Keep her on a long lead so that you
can have more control over what goes into the dog's mouth.


Quote:

>My dog loves to chew and eat street garbage so I always keep a good eye on
>her.
>So I'm walking my beagle tonight, just like any other night... I see her
>about 30 meters ahead of me chewing and eating something... I call her over
>and she drags this long thing over.  Immediately, I yelled at her for
>picking up garbage again and instinctively she took off ahead again.

>I walked up to the object she had been chewing and eating, and guess what
it
>was?
>It was another dog's feces!!!!

>I was absolutely shocked and angry!!!  Thoughts of me play fighting with
her
>and having my hand in her mouth (suddenly) made me feel sick.

>My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?
>I mean, before tonight, I have never seen this type of behaviour from my
>dog.  Usually, when she sees another dog's poo, she just sniffs at it and
>then leaves it as is.  She is a year and two months old now.

>Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.  Please reply to the newsgroup.
>Thanks in advance.

>Terry

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by GRNFLDBR » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

Yup. In fact, I've thought about trying to market "essence of cat litterbox" as
an appetite aid for dogs-some are almost compulsive/***ive about it.  Some
vets and other animal gurus will tell you it means the dog is lacking some
vital nutrient or mineral. This is worth checking out, as we had one dog that
was re-injesting his own 'goodies' and it turned out he was lacking an enzyme,
so he needed to twice-digest everything.  Kinda like a cow with it's cud.
 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Elaine Gallan » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>> My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

>   This, to me, is The Big Question.  My research colleagues and I
>postulate that it's an abnormal behavior, but we have to do more research
>to evaluate it.

 Eric- of course it's a normal behavior. The droppings of a very well fed
animal have a lot of nutrient. How much nutrient the animal removes from
foodstuff is dependent on how well it is used to being fed. If the animal's
body really needs food, most of the food value will be absorbed. Most pet
dogs are very well fed, and underexercised. That leaves a lot of food in the
digestive waste.
 Some dogs are just more prone to wolfing down the waste products than
other. Beagles are notorious for this.
 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Terr » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Thank you all for your replies and comments.

From what I've read here, it is a common problem among dog owners.  (Even
so, I am asking myself why I never heard of it before if it was so
common?!?)

I am still a little shocked and disgusted with my dog... and it is beginning
to show.
I no longer let her play with my hand in her mouth or even jump on top of
me... I can't get that mental picture out of my mind.

I think I need time to adjust to this.  Anyway, I just wanted to thank you
guys for the helpful comments and feedback.

Terry.

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Erik H. Hofmeiste » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> >> My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

> >   This, to me, is The Big Question.  My research colleagues and I
> >postulate that it's an abnormal behavior, but we have to do more research
> >to evaluate it.

>  Eric- of course it's a normal behavior. The droppings of a very well fed
> animal have a lot of nutrient. How much nutrient the animal removes from
> foodstuff is dependent on how well it is used to being fed. If the animal's
> body really needs food, most of the food value will be absorbed. Most pet
> dogs are very well fed, and underexercised. That leaves a lot of food in the
> digestive waste.

   While I may agree that your rationale is reasonable, that doesn't mean
it's correct.  It's difficult to determine what a 'normal' behavior is.
Is it something that 50%+1 of all dogs do?  How many dogs have to exhibit
coprophagia in order for us to consider the behavior normal?  Is
depression in humans normal?  It affects huge numbers of us, but I think
most people would say no, it's not a normal behavior.  Until we pursue
this line of thinking with scientific, peer-review studies of coprophagia,
we cannot say if it is normal or abnormal.

Erik "Rouleaux" Hofmeister
WSU Class '00

PLEASE NOTE: In the absence of a traditional veterinarian-client-patient
relationship, this information should be taken as a friendly opinion, not
as an official clinical recommendation.  Also realize that I am a veterinary
student, and anything stated should be taken with that in mind.

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Ton » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Until we pursue this line of thinking with
>scientific, peer-review studies of coprophagia,
>we cannot say if it is normal or abnormal.

Normal or abnormal, judging from this ng it is pretty damned common!
Pet owners are not necessarily looking for a thesis-- just assurrance
that their pup is not a weirdo, and suggestions on how to "eliminate"
the behaviors.

Yep, it's common.
Pick up your dogs poop the minute it drops (you should be doing this
anyway), and supervise him when he is in poop infested areas. Put the
cat box behind a gate that the cat can jump over. If you want to
experiment, try Forbid, Deter, meat tenderizer, or other taste altering
substances.

Good supervision and the habit will never develop.

Toni
www.irish-wolfhounds.com

 
 
 

Shocked at what I caught my dog doing...

Post by Lori Lecont » Fri, 23 Apr 1999 04:00:00


I think we can all agree that it is common behavior, if not
'normal'.                                                      Lori
Quote:


> > >> My question to you experienced dog owner's is:  IS THIS NORMAL?

> > >   This, to me, is The Big Question.  My research colleagues and I
> > >postulate that it's an abnormal behavior, but we have to do more research
> > >to evaluate it.

> >  Eric- of course it's a normal behavior. The droppings of a very well fed
> > animal have a lot of nutrient. How much nutrient the animal removes from
> > foodstuff is dependent on how well it is used to being fed. If the animal's
> > body really needs food, most of the food value will be absorbed. Most pet
> > dogs are very well fed, and underexercised. That leaves a lot of food in the
> > digestive waste.

>    While I may agree that your rationale is reasonable, that doesn't mean
> it's correct.  It's difficult to determine what a 'normal' behavior is.
> Is it something that 50%+1 of all dogs do?  How many dogs have to exhibit
> coprophagia in order for us to consider the behavior normal?  Is
> depression in humans normal?  It affects huge numbers of us, but I think
> most people would say no, it's not a normal behavior.  Until we pursue
> this line of thinking with scientific, peer-review studies of coprophagia,
> we cannot say if it is normal or abnormal.

> Erik "Rouleaux" Hofmeister
> WSU Class '00

> PLEASE NOTE: In the absence of a traditional veterinarian-client-patient
> relationship, this information should be taken as a friendly opinion, not
> as an official clinical recommendation.  Also realize that I am a veterinary
> student, and anything stated should be taken with that in mind.