How do you teach "fetch"?

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How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by Klein L » Sun, 29 Jan 1995 06:51:07




  Here's the thing:  she loves for us to throw it.  She'll chase it and

Quote:
> bring it right back to us, snuggling up so she's touching it, but she just
> won't "drop it" and let us throw it again.  She just wants to chew the thing
> into tiny shreds.  I'm sure she thinks we're as fond of it as she is, and she
> no doubt thinks we won't ever return it to her.   By the way, she is
> absolutely fine about us being near her when she eats, not posessive about
> food or anything.  

> Any ideas about how to teach her to fetch it?  Actually, she does fetch it,
> now that I think about it, she just won't return it...
> Mary Hegeman
> University of Missouri


One way to teach her to drop it, is to squeeze her upper lips onto
her teeth until it gets so uncomfortable that she open her mouth and
drops it.  Then give lots of praise.  If it's not something forbidden,
give it back right away, giving her the message that you won't keep
it.  The return of the toy also serves as a reward for her relinquishing
her toy.  

If she loves for you to throw it, don't throw it unless she drops it
in front of you.  Don't try to grab for it (after she's learned to
drop it), just hold your hand out open until she drops it.  And
especially don't pull on it.  This tends to escalate into a tug-of-war.

Hope this helps.  Good luck.

Julia Hsi Morris

 
 
 

How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by amy young-leit » Mon, 30 Jan 1995 15:14:40



[...]

Quote:
>Any ideas about how to teach her to fetch it?  Actually, she does fetch it,
>now that I think about it, she just won't return it...
>Mary Hegeman
>University of Missouri


Your description of the *** moose had me rolling.  =-)

We had a similar "problem" with Bijou (it's not really a problem, she
just doesn't know what you want from her; you have to teach her).  She
would fetch and bring something back, but she'd play the great teasing
game where she's run righ tat us and then veer off at the last second,
then run around us as if to say, "I've got the ball, I've got the ball
neener neener neener."

We taught her "release" in one short afternoon by doing the following:

We went to play ball as normal, and we took treats (we've found random
food rewarding to really up her "absorbtion" of concepts) with us,
along with a duplicate item that she'd be interested in.

We'd throw item one, and call her to return to us, praising her when
she did.  We'd then say "release" and hold up the other item.  She'd
drop the item in her mouth because she wanted item #2.  She'd get
praise and periodically a treat for dropping the item.  We started
this off on leash so she wouldn't run around.  After only a few
moments she was doing this pretty reliably on leash, but then once you
move to off leash the proceedure sort of starts all over again.  If
she wouldn't come to us and release we'd turn out back to her and
ignore her, and within seconds she's be in front of us and dropping
the object, and she quickly learned to come to us and drop the object
when we commanded her to.

This works in all types of situations now, whether she's got toys or
something else.

amy

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \       Amy Young-Leith       Bloomington, Indiana       Lifetime Student
   \ /\                (That thing to the left is a bunny!)
   ( )        The views expressed within represent only my opinions.
 .( o ).              http://www.moonsgarden.com/~alyoung

 
 
 

How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by Damon Feldm » Tue, 31 Jan 1995 12:00:27


Quote:
(Mary Hegeman) writes:
>But it's her favorite toy to shake furiously, toss into the air and
>chase.  Here's the thing:  she loves for us to throw it.  She'll chase it and
>bring it right back to us, snuggling up so she's touching it, but she just
>won't "drop it" and let us throw it again.  She just wants to chew the thing
>into tiny shreds.  I'm sure she thinks we're as fond of it as she is, and she
>no doubt thinks we won't ever return it to her.

Is she right?  What do you do when you take the moose?

Anyhow, you should always teach the retrieve with two mooses (meese?).
The one you are waiving around should be more interesting than the
one just laying there in her mouth.  If she is not more interested in
the mooose you are throwing around (shake it, bounce it, bobble it
and, if a moose is so equiped, make it squeak) loose the moose for
the retreive.  Use balls or tug ropes or (my favorite) soft ***
squeaky toys.  In this case, she's got a possessive thing about the
moose so using it will start you at a disadvantage.  ONce she learns
the retreive with a ball or squeaky you can move up to the moose.

Damon
--
---------

Tulane University Computer Science Dept.

 
 
 

How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by Damon Feldm » Tue, 31 Jan 1995 12:13:56


Quote:
(Klein Lab) writes:

>> bring it right back to us, snuggling up so she's touching it, but she just
>> won't "drop it" and let us throw it again.  She just wants to chew the thing
>One way to teach her to drop it, is to squeeze her upper lips onto
>her teeth until it gets so uncomfortable that she open her mouth and
>drops it.  Then give lots of praise.

This will make the dog drop it, but may make the dog refuse to come
anywhere near you when she has it (esp. if she has shown reluctance
to give it up).  The praise after may not be enough of a reward
to make the lip-pinch and the loss of the toy worthwhile.
Also, she may decide that the whole game is no fun anymore and
stop chasing it in the first place, which means forcing her to
"take it" with an ear-pinch.  Too much pinching for my tastes -- she
has a natural prey/retreval desire, so use it.

Damon
--
---------

Tulane University Computer Science Dept.

 
 
 

How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by John Wee » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 09:33:13



Quote:


>  Here's the thing:  she loves for us to throw it.  She'll chase it and
>> bring it right back to us, snuggling up so she's touching it, but she just
>> won't "drop it" and let us throw it again.  She just wants to chew the thing
>> into tiny shreds.  I'm sure she thinks we're as fond of it as she is, and she
>> no doubt thinks we won't ever return it to her.   By the way, she is
>> absolutely fine about us being near her when she eats, not posessive about
>> food or anything.  

>> Any ideas about how to teach her to fetch it?  Actually, she does fetch it,
>> now that I think about it, she just won't return it...
>> Mary Hegeman
>> University of Missouri

>One way to teach her to drop it, is to squeeze her upper lips onto
>her teeth until it gets so uncomfortable that she open her mouth and
>drops it.  Then give lots of praise.  If it's not something forbidden,
>give it back right away, giving her the message that you won't keep
>it.  The return of the toy also serves as a reward for her relinquishing
>her toy.  

>If she loves for you to throw it, don't throw it unless she drops it
>in front of you.  Don't try to grab for it (after she's learned to
>drop it), just hold your hand out open until she drops it.  And
>especially don't pull on it.  This tends to escalate into a tug-of-war.

But note that what you are teaching her here is the "drop" or "out" or "release"
command. Note also that when you do the squeeze, it is preceeded by some
such command. Now this is good-one of the necessary commands for dog
that's easy to live with. It is not, however, the same as teaching the dog to
fetch.

To fetch, a dog goes to an object on command, picks the object up and
carries it back to you, releasing it in whatever manner it has been tought
(e.g. dropping it at your feet, holding it and dropping it in your hand on
command ... ). Many if not most dogs who are not retrievers will not retrieve
or "fetch" naturally. There are various techniques to "force break" a dog to
retrieve - not a *** thing, no more so than "force breaking" them to heel.
Terriers don't in general have retrieving instincts. I'm not sure I'd worry about
it. You might note that it may work better in the long run if you initiate this
kind of play - it preserves your alpha status :-)

-John Weeks-

 
 
 

How do you teach "fetch"?

Post by Mary Hegem » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 17:24:47


Quote:
>But note that what you are teaching her here is the "drop" or "out" or "release"
>command. Note also that when you do the squeeze, it is preceeded by some
>such command. Now this is good-one of the necessary commands for dog
>that's easy to live with. It is not, however, the same as teaching the dog to
>fetch.
>To fetch, a dog goes to an object on command, picks the object up and
>carries it back to you, releasing it in whatever manner it has been tought
>(e.g. dropping it at your feet, holding it and dropping it in your hand on
>command ... ). Many if not most dogs who are not retrievers will not retrieve
>or "fetch" naturally. There are various techniques to "force break" a dog to
>retrieve - not a *** thing, no more so than "force breaking" them to heel.
>Terriers don't in general have retrieving instincts. I'm not sure I'd worry about
>it. You might note that it may work better in the long run if you initiate this
>kind of play - it preserves your alpha status :-)
>-John Weeks-


I guess my goal here is to involve myself in her playtime by having her
release her toy to me so that I can throw it for her.  I've never had a dog
that did the old classic
"here-it-is-I'll-drop-it-at-your-feet-please-throw-it-for-me-again!"  But  
then again, she's not a retriever.

I've had some success in an accidental way with two tennis balls.  I throw
one, then the other.  She doesn't relinquish them on purpose, but we manage a
play session that way.

Mary Hegeman
University of Missouri