Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

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Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by Nirav N. Tol » Sat, 22 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Hello!

I am in the process of deciding which type of dog to bring into my home,
and I was hoping that y'all could help by giving your suggestions and
advice.

I have read a few of the FAQs regarding choosing a breed and have done
some reading on the subject, but I have yet to narrow my choices.

Here are some important facts:

1 - I live in an apartment, but there is a park and plenty of trails nearby.

2 - I desire a small (max. 17 inches) dog.

3 - I prefer a dog who sheds minimally, and who is known as clean.

4 - I prefer a dog who has a short coat.

5 - I am willing to spend plenty of time with my dog, but I want very
strongly to be able to train my pet, both for obedience and for sport.

6 - I MUST be able to housebreak my pet, so I need to choose a breed
condusive to housetraining.

That's all I can think of for now -- please let me know if I've forgotten
important considerations. I will be a first time owner (though my family
adopted a 3 yr old Lhaso Apso), and so I am fairly ignorant about training
and especially ignorant about puppies.

I've been advised to look at dalmations, miniature pinschers, beagles,
labrador retrievers, chihauhaus, and several other breeds, and yet I don't
have a good idea of what would suit my situation best.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Nirav N. Tolia

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by Stacy Jone » Sun, 23 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> 1 - I live in an apartment, but there is a park and plenty of trails nearby.

> 2 - I desire a small (max. 17 inches) dog.

> 3 - I prefer a dog who sheds minimally, and who is known as clean.

> 4 - I prefer a dog who has a short coat.

> 5 - I am willing to spend plenty of time with my dog, but I want very
> strongly to be able to train my pet, both for obedience and for sport.

> 6 - I MUST be able to housebreak my pet, so I need to choose a breed
> condusive to housetraining.I don't know much about this breed, you might want to look more up on

them, but a friend of mine has a Basenji.  His dog is not very large,
bout the same size a full grown Jack Russell.  She is very well trained.
And she lives in a small house with no problems.  Nice thing about
Basenji's is they don't bark.  Great apartment dog.

Good Luck
Stacy and Fuzzy

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by Salvatore Profeta Jr » Mon, 24 Jun 1996 04:00:00


                Hi! I read your article and thought I could help.  I'm in the process
of moving and and my sister and I are planning to get two dogs (one for
each) so for a while (at least a year and half) we have been studing
different breeds and one I have studied is the Italian Greyhound.  They
grow to be about 10 to 12 inches tall, very short coat, very clean and
amost never smells but, it is prone to the cold.  Also it has thin bone
and thin skin. I'm not sure about training but from what I have read
about Greyhounds and simlar dogs they should be fairy easy.

Hope I helped.
Luisa      

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by Gail B. Mackierna » Tue, 25 Jun 1996 04:00:00


I would strongly suggest that you attend a dog show to see what type of
breed appeals to you, and at the same time, start reading books. Many of
the breeds which have been suggested to you 1) shed profusely, 2) are
active and not suited well to apartment living and 3) range the gamut
from tiny to large. Keep in mind that short-coated dogs shed continually
and that the short stiff hairs work their way into everything. A small
short-haired breed, esp. one with a fine thin coat like an Italian
Greyhound, shed the least (or it is less apparent). You may wish to look
at a small wire-haired breed, such as a miniature wire Dachshund, which
requires relatively little grooming but also sheds little.

You may wish to consider an older puppy, say 4-5 months old, *if* it has
been living in a household situation. Many breeders retain their best
pups for a while to choose the pick, and may sell the other as a pet.
Also, a promising pup may get too large (or stay too small), develop
crooked front teeth, etc. These puppies are often fully house and crate
trained, lead trained, used to kids, noise and confusion. Many have been
to Kindergarten Puppy Training, so they have a head start.

Gail Mackiernan

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by Katharine E. Ma » Wed, 26 Jun 1996 04:00:00


I'd rule out dalmatians and labs as too large and bumptious
(labs also shed quite a lot).
A smooth dachshund or basset would be good for your
situation; the first would be livelier, the second more laid
back. Or a pug, possibly; or a whippet, if you have a safe place
where the dog could stretch its legs. If you don't mind
grooming (as opposed to shedding), miniature poodles can be
lovely dogs.

Katharine Maus and Ch. Csillag's Bartok (vizsla)

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by BBre » Thu, 27 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Yes, you are correct "Basenjis do not bark" -- they yodel.

 
 
 

Help Wanted: Choosing a Breed.

Post by l.. » Fri, 28 Jun 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>Hello!
>I am in the process of deciding which type of dog to bring into my home,
>and I was hoping that y'all could help by giving your suggestions and
>advice.
>1 - I live in an apartment, but there is a park and plenty of trails nearby.
>2 - I desire a small (max. 17 inches) dog.
>3 - I prefer a dog who sheds minimally, and who is known as clean.
>4 - I prefer a dog who has a short coat.
>5 - I am willing to spend plenty of time with my dog, but I want very
>strongly to be able to train my pet, both for obedience and for sport.
>6 - I MUST be able to housebreak my pet, so I need to choose a breed
>condusive to housetraining.
>That's all I can think of for now -- please let me know if I've forgotten
>important considerations. I will be a first time owner (though my family
>adopted a 3 yr old Lhaso Apso), and so I am fairly ignorant about training
>and especially ignorant about puppies.

American Eskimos (the White Spitz) can meet all your requirements
except that they do shed and have long, but easily maintained white
coats. However they are extremely clean dogs. They are highly
intelligent, active dogs and can readily adapt to apartment living.
They are eager to please and hence can make good obedience dogs
(despite a slight streak of stubbornesss). They enjoy the
outdoors/nature hikes. Eskies require daily exercise, running,
retrieve games, etc. to be tractable and happy. They are typically of
medium build and are fairly sturdy. They NEED daily human
companionship/communication and are extremely loyal dogs.

Due to their high intelligence they require focused training in order
to reach their maximum potential and to learn to modulate their
considerable energy. If you are looking for a highly intelligent,
active, beautiful, loyal, and normally sweet dog then you should
investigate the breed.

Final Note: No breed is perfect and there is considerable variation
within a breed. Further the limits to your dog's potential will
probably be more a function of YOUR limitations than the dog's.
Remember this and seek ways of creatively understanding and teaching
your dog. If you exert the effort you will end up with a vibrant,
intelligent companion that will give you undying loyalty, love and
spontaneity. If you don't exert the effort, then you will have a pet.