Good Vet Bad Vet?

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Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Glen Dixo » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00



My dog has just been bitten quite badly, a 2 inch circumfrance wound
exposing his muscle underneath, and I took him strait away up to the vet.
He said that it looked quite bad, gave us some antibiotics and told us to
bring him in tomorrow morning when he would anethatise him and stich him
up.

Is this the right response, as I thought that with cuts it was very
important to stich it as soon as possible, the sooner the better, I believe
it is called the first 24 golden hours.

Anybody know?

Thanks

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Lady DarkRos » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> My dog has just been bitten quite badly, a 2 inch circumfrance wound
> exposing his muscle underneath, and I took him strait away up to the vet.
> He said that it looked quite bad, gave us some antibiotics and told us to
> bring him in tomorrow morning when he would anethatise him and stich him
> up.

> Is this the right response, as I thought that with cuts it was very
> important to stich it as soon as possible, the sooner the better, I believe
> it is called the first 24 golden hours.

> Anybody know?

Sounds like a bad vet to me! I'm no expert, but I would think if the
wound was that bad, the doctor would take care of it immediately. You
might want to take him to another vet for a secon opinion.

Lily

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Elaine Galleg » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


 Bad bites are generally stitched up. Stitching wounds, of course, is a
lot of work. Wounds are generally stitched right away, before swelling
sets in.
 Puncture wounds and especially animal bites are sometimes not stitched
up. Sometimes, they leave them open so that the wound can drain.
Sometimes, they even install plastic drains to facilitate draining.
 If he planned to stitch it, the proceedure should have been done right
away. My neighbor's dog got all torn up in a fight. They stitched him up
right away.
 An alternative to stitching is to use super glue, which was invented to
seal skin. I could accept proper gluing as opposted to stitching, but
would naturally expect the proceedure to being immediately. Waiting a day
first is not acceptable.

: My dog has just been bitten quite badly, a 2 inch circumfrance wound
: exposing his muscle underneath, and I took him strait away up to the vet.
: He said that it looked quite bad, gave us some antibiotics and told us to
: bring him in tomorrow morning when he would anethatise him and stich him
: up.

: Is this the right response, as I thought that with cuts it was very
: important to stich it as soon as possible, the sooner the better, I believe
: it is called the first 24 golden hours.

: Anybody know?

: Thanks

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Ton » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


I know that I would be quite unhappy with such a response- the dog is
there, the vet is there, and I can think of no reason to wait.( I
thought the "golden hours" were only 12!!)

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by r_sc.. » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


I'm assuming Elaine does *not* mean Superglue, a trademarked product
distinctly not recommended for faux skin suturing, but rather Cut 'n
Heal, which *is* used topically on wounds, et al.

Tracy Landauer

<snip>

Quote:
>  An alternative to stitching is to use super glue, which was invented to seal skin. I could accept proper gluing as opposted to stitching, but
> would naturally expect the proceedure to being immediately. Waiting a

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Karen Maillo » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I'm assuming Elaine does *not* mean Superglue, a trademarked product
> distinctly not recommended for faux skin suturing, but rather Cut 'n
> Heal, which *is* used topically on wounds, et al.

> Tracy Landauer

SuperGlue was, indeed, developed as a quick, easy substitute for suturing
in some situations (specifically for use in the battlefield, as I recall).
It was later promoted as a multi-purpose adhesive. The topic came up on
Spanie-L about a year ago--the husband of one of the list members works
for the manufacturer, and he provided a brief history of the
wonder-product.  

Karen

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Elaine Galleg » Wed, 20 May 1998 04:00:00


 I had heard that superglue was invented for use in brain surgery. Many
fine *** vessels in this area, and suturing would not be appropriate.
 As I hear, some emergency clinic use superglue to seal cuts that
otherwise would have to be stitched.


: > I'm assuming Elaine does *not* mean Superglue, a trademarked product
: > distinctly not recommended for faux skin suturing, but rather Cut 'n
: > Heal, which *is* used topically on wounds, et al.
: >
: > Tracy Landauer
: >
: >
: >

: SuperGlue was, indeed, developed as a quick, easy substitute for suturing
: in some situations (specifically for use in the battlefield, as I recall).
: It was later promoted as a multi-purpose adhesive. The topic came up on
: Spanie-L about a year ago--the husband of one of the list members works
: for the manufacturer, and he provided a brief history of the
: wonder-product.  

: Karen

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Cat in Alas » Wed, 20 May 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

> I had heard that superglue was invented for use in brain surgery. Many
>fine *** vessels in this area, and suturing would not be appropriate.
> As I hear, some emergency clinic use superglue to seal cuts that
>otherwise would have to be stitched.

My husband underwent triple-by-pass surgery about 10 weeks ago
(Mar.11th). They took a vein from his leg to do the by-passes, and both
outer incisions (leg and chest) were closed with the new type of surgical
glue. No stiches at all, since his sternum was bound back together with
wire, and absolutely no problem with the glue... incisions stayed closed
and neat.
Heck... I thought it was pretty neat, the scar is not _nearly_ as bad
looking as one would be that used stiches.

Cat in Alaska
(for those who didn't know... *yes*, he's doing fine not, was undiagnosed
*** onset diabetes, now under control, that caused the whole thing.
He's been back at work for almost 2 weeks now)

 
 
 

Good Vet Bad Vet?

Post by Shannon Larki » Wed, 20 May 1998 04:00:00


Your vet may have been being cautious.  It is safer to stitch a wound
after antibiotics have been given, than stitch it, have it infect and
fester, and have to undo the stitches and let it drain.  

Did you ask your vet why s/he recommended this course of action?

-Shannon and Guinness

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