good deeds not rewarded

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good deeds not rewarded

Post by John Bell » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00



we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.  
basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.

this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.  
she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my own
business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, screaming at it,
etc.   now i could care less about this idiot, but i do care about the
dog, and will take it in next time i find it loose.  my question, i guess
is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.  
any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Speedy-P.. » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
>sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
>didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
>her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
>them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.  
>basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
>both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
>didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
>the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.

>this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
>the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
>down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.  
>she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
>her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my >own business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, s=

creaming at >it, etc.  
Quote:
>now i could care less about this idiot, but i do care about the
>dog, and will take it in next time i find it loose.  my question, i >guess is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i =

insist >that she bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am >concerned about this situation, and obviously the dog=
 will continue to >get out.  any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

Unfortunately, if you hold the dog against her will and ask for proof
of a collar, they could begin some legal problems (criminal & civil)
that wouldn't be worth it!

I got the impression the dog probably prefers staying at your home
because it has some friends who treat it good.

My main concern is the dog may be neglected and abused. I feel very
sorry for this poor dog. I know what you'd like to do to the owners,
but it's not worth getting in trouble over.

Maybe a complaint to the apartment manager would help the situation.
I only hope they won't take their frustrations out on the dog.

Hopefully...someone will have a solution to the problem. Please keep
us updated. Yes, the owners are "idiots!"

=KEN=

--

=================================================================
**If you call me and I am not at home my "Always-In-Touch" paging
    unit will transfer your Caller ID number to my pager. For
    additional information ask me and I'll send you e/mail**

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Marku » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
> sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
> didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
> her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
> them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.
> basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
> both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
> didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
> the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.

> this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
> the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
> down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.
> she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
> her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my own
> business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, screaming at it,
> etc.   now i could care less about this idiot, but i do care about the
> dog, and will take it in next time i find it loose.  my question, i guess
> is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
> bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
> about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.
> any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

Now that you know who the dog belongs to you are legally responsible to bring
it back. It is considered ***ping if you take it to the pound.
Complain to your manager.

Also next time you see the dog call animal control and have them remove it.
Before hand though tell the owner you plan to call animal control the next
time you see it so if the dog is missing they will know where to look.
They can't prove you called the dog catcher.

Markus

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Diane Blackm » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Talk to animal control.  See if you bring the dog in (1) will they
keep your name confidential and (2) will they make sure to notify
you if the owner does not redeem the dog.  I found my local animal
control very helpful in that regard.  I brought the dogs in (2 from
the same family) and stressed that I did not want the dogs to pay
for the owner's carelessness.  Animal control agreed to cooperate.
The primary advantage is that it will protect you legally.  If you
do wind up with the dog I do recommend you do not keep it, even
while finding it a better home.  Find someone to foster it, perhaps
a rescue group.

Diane Blackman

http://www.moonsgarden.com/

: we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
: sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
: didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
: her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
<snip>
: this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
: the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
: down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.  
: she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
<snip>
: bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
: about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.  
: any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

--
Diane Blackman  

Companion of Tanith and Oso; Nox, Yoda, Lady Greystoke
and Mr. Doublestuff
_  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _
You must speak to be heard.

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Lisa Olson-McDonal » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
>sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
>didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
>her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
>them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.  
>basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
>both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
>didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
>the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.
*snip*
>is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
>bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
>about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.  
>any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

Gee, this sounds very similar to some neighbors we had.  Unfortunately my
neighbors were not only a**holes, but they were also malicious.  When
they lived in the house attatched to ours, they had a black lab puppy
that they would leave outside all day in below zero weather, tie it up
with a ***collar and leave for the store, etc.  I could go on and on
about these people.  Thank God they moved out in May.

I was afraid to call the humane society, or the police because we had
horses on the property that I was afraid something might "accidentally"
happen to them when I left for work during the day.  The husband was
arrested for battery (for beating up a guy that cut him off in traffic).
 So as guilty and as "wrong" as it sounds, I didn't do anything.  I
regret it, but at the same time, I feared for my animals, my safety, and
my property.  They've stolen from us, destroyed property, and so on.  Of
course they were clever enough to not leave any evidence that they did
it.  Once they did move out, I did report them to the police, but nothing
became of it.  The police simply asked them if all this was true, they
said "no" and it was simply my word against theirs.  And of course, they
also have two children and another one on the way (why do a**holes
reproduce?).

ANYWAY, if you do not feel threatened by these jerks, I would either call
the authorities, or call the humane society.  If you live in an urban
area, there are probably regulations on having a dog license, a leash
law, proof of current rabies vaccinations, etc. None of which I'm sure
the owners have.  I feel bad for this dog, as he/she sounds very sweet
and kind.  If the dog is impounded, it will probably not be returned
until the owners consent to rabies vaccinations, license, a leash, etc.  
If they do not claim the dog, perhaps you can adopt him/her?  Do you know
of any friends who might want the dog if it were put up for adoption?

I would not try to take the matters into your own hands, mostly for legal
reasons.  A**holes can be malicious,and might stop at nothing to "get
even".  They might sue, call the police ON YOU, or destroy property.  I
tried to help out with our neighbors - politely showing them what to do
and not to do with their puppy.  They nodded, smiled, and then did what
they wanted anyway.  They had their heads too far up their butts to hear
what I was saying.

I wish you luck, because I've been in your shoes, more or less.  Please
let us know what becomes of this.

Lisa Olson-McDonald
Old McDonald's Farm
Sparta, WI

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Ben Brinkman » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
> the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
> down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.
> she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
> her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my own
> business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, screaming at it,
> before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
> bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
> about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.
> any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

How about calling animal control next time? I'd bet that a trip to
the local pound and a $50 fine will get their attention. That is,
if they bother to retrieve the dog from the authorities. I don't
know your local ordinances, but here, a dog running around without
city tags or rabies vacc. tags would raise quite a few questions
with animal control.

Actually, that brings up another question- has the loose dog had
a rabies vaccination? Without the tags, you can't be sure, and
I'd definitely not let a potentially unvaccinated dog into my home.
This sounds like a situation for the local authorities to handle.

Good Luck.
-Ben

--
_______________________________________________________

The Brinkmanns                 913 Ninth St. NE
Ben, Deb, and Dahlia           Rochester, MN 55906

_______________________________________________________

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Bob6 » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
(John Bell jr) writes:
>we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
>sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
>didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
>her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
>them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.  
>basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
>both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
>didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
>the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.

Next time just turn the dog over to the apartment office. if you keep
doing that, Imam sure things will get better. The way I in the past have
dealt with dogs that roam on my property is the hang on to the dog and
have shelter pick dog up. They'll come out if they do not have to chase
the dog. When I first moved here backin '82, roaming dogs were a minor
problem. No more. Peole do get the point when they have to bailout their
dog.

Bob Maida
Manassas,Va

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Bill Brau » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
> sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
> didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
> her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
> them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.
> basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
> both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
> didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
> the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.

> this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
> the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
> down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.
> she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
> her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my own
> business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, screaming at it,
> etc.   now i could care less about this idiot, but i do care about the
> dog, and will take it in next time i find it loose.  my question, i guess
> is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
> bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
> about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.
> any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

Hi John,

I would be thinking of doing the same thing under similar circumstances.  I have a
couple of thoughts...

From your narrative I get the impression you were trying to have a rational
conversation with someone who was not rational, at least during your conversation
with each other.  Before you decide on any definitive action, keep that in mind in
terms of anticipating the future.

I have to admit that these situations present a dilemma regarding the balance
between rights and responsibilities.  I didn't read anywhere in your post that you
thought the dog was ill-treated or poorly fed, etc. (not ignoring the potential
danger the dog faces running loose).  In that context, it would be hard to say that
the dog really must have a different home.

Although I share your sentiment, I would be cautious about personally intervening
in the situation.  Perhaps letting the owner know that you intend to notify local
authorities the next time the dog is loose is one step you could take.  I would
anticipate a rough response based on your experience so far but she wouldn't be
able to say she didn't get a fair chance to rectify the problem herself.

Bill Braun

------------------------------------------------------
Medical Practice Systems Inc.  (216) 382-7111 (Voice)
and The Health Systems Group   http://www.moonsgarden.com/
Mergers - Planning - Management Services
Marketing - Managed Care - Education & Training

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Walter Eric Johns » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00



: we live in an apartment complex.  one day while i was at lunch to walk
: sammy, a corgi was running around the yard, out in the street, etc.  i
: didn't know what to do, but she followed us inside, so i decided to put
: her in kitchen with sammy for afternoon and called the complex to let
: them know i had a stray.  that evening, the owners came to get the dog.  
: basically were real a**holes about me taking the dog in.  i told them
: both to do us all a favor, and put a collar and tag on the dog.  they
: didn't like that one bit, and basically told me to f*** off.  of course
: the kicker was "she never gets out".  no comment.
:
: this morning, i open my door to take sammy out before going to work, and
: the corgi runs inside, eats, drinks, and takes a toy to the couch to lay
: down.  i coax the dog outside with sammy, and we run into her mother.  
: she insinuated that i was attempting to *** her dog.  i again asked
: her if she had a collar and tag, and she basically told me to mind my own
: business.  meanwhile she's chasing the dog everywhere, screaming at it,
: etc.   now i could care less about this idiot, but i do care about the
: dog, and will take it in next time i find it loose.  my question, i guess
: is, before i turn the animal back over to her, should i insist that she
: bring me a collar and tag, or even proof of ownership?  i am concerned
: about this situation, and obviously the dog will continue to get out.  
: any advice would be helpful.  thanks.

Next time, call the Dog Pound and have them come pick up the
dog.  Having to pay the fees to get the dog back will
hopefully teach them a lesson.  If they don't want to pay
the fees, see if the Pound will let you adopt the dog if
you want it.

Eric Johnson

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Walter Eric Johns » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


: Now that you know who the dog belongs to you are legally responsible to bring
: it back. It is considered ***ping if you take it to the pound.
: Complain to your manager.

You mean that if I see a dog walking down the street and I know who
it belongs to, I am required by law to go get it and deliver it to
the owner's hands?  Nonsense.

: Also next time you see the dog call animal control and have them remove it.
: Before hand though tell the owner you plan to call animal control the next
: time you see it so if the dog is missing they will know where to look.
: They can't prove you called the dog catcher.

He could hang a banner across his newly installed bullet-proof glass
declaring that he was the one who called the pound.

Eric Johnson

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Marku » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


> : Now that you know who the dog belongs to you are legally responsible to bring
> : it back. It is considered ***ping if you take it to the pound.
> : Complain to your manager.

> You mean that if I see a dog walking down the street and I know who
> it belongs to, I am required by law to go get it and deliver it to
> the owner's hands?  Nonsense.

You seem to miss the boat on alot of threads these days. You can just ignore
the dog. But in NC you can't attempt to place a dog in another home or just
turn in into the pound without notification of who it belongs to.

Get a clue,
Markus

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Lisa Olson-McDonal » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Don't know where the Corgi was running around, but in western Wisconsin
(especially rural areas), rabies is common in the skunk population.  
There are also an overpopulation of racoons, opposums, and coyotes.  Even
in urban areas, you'll see racoon & opposum road kill quite often.

We vaccinate our horses for rabies, as well.

Just my 2 cents . . .

Lisa

 
 
 

good deeds not rewarded

Post by Walter Eric Johns » Fri, 12 Jul 1996 04:00:00


:
: Actually, that brings up another question- has the loose dog had
: a rabies vaccination? Without the tags, you can't be sure, and
: I'd definitely not let a potentially unvaccinated dog into my home.
: This sounds like a situation for the local authorities to handle.

Is rabies a big problem around there?  In Texas, we  
have a far higher chance of dying from eating at the local
fast-food place than from rabies.

Eric Johnson