Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

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Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by Bertha » Sun, 04 Aug 1996 04:00:00



I live in Rochester, New York. My vet says there is a lot of parvo virus
up here. My puppy is now 15 weeks old, and her 4th set of shots. She's due
for another at 18 weeks. My pup is a very energetic Lab, and I'm dying to
let her run off some of this energy in local parks. But my vet is saying
to be cautious, and wait until she's had all of her shots. How is parvo
transmitted? Airborne? Through contact with other dogs' feces? Do you
think he's being too conservative? If you can, please e-mail me directly.
Thanks!

-Barbara


barbarak

 
 
 

Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by Stephen Barnar » Sun, 04 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I live in Rochester, New York. My vet says there is a lot of parvo virus
> up here. My puppy is now 15 weeks old, and her 4th set of shots. She's due
> for another at 18 weeks. My pup is a very energetic Lab, and I'm dying to
> let her run off some of this energy in local parks. But my vet is saying
> to be cautious, and wait until she's had all of her shots. How is parvo
> transmitted? Airborne? Through contact with other dogs' feces? Do you
> think he's being too conservative? If you can, please e-mail me directly.
> Thanks!

> -Barbara


> barbarak

I'd wait, but I understand that it's tempting.

Socializing a young dog is important.  Your dog won't be in any danger
of parvo if she's just around other vaccinated dogs.  What you have to
watch out for is letting her walk around where all sorts of
who-knows-what dogs have been (i.e., local parks).  Maybe you have
friends with well cared-for dogs that you can introduce your dog to.

        Steve Barnard

 
 
 

Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by Lynda Oleks » Mon, 05 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>I live in Rochester, New York. My vet says there is a lot of parvo virus
>up here. My puppy is now 15 weeks old, and her 4th set of shots. She's due
>for another at 18 weeks. My pup is a very energetic Lab, and I'm dying to
>let her run off some of this energy in local parks. But my vet is saying
>to be cautious, and wait until she's had all of her shots. How is parvo
>transmitted? Airborne? Through contact with other dogs' feces? Do you
>think he's being too conservative? If you can, please e-mail me directly.

It's a fecal-***transmission -- unfortunately, the virus is very
resistant and can live in the dirt for years and is resistant to many
disinfectants. This means if your puppy eats some grass and roots from
dirt where a dog pooped two years ago at a park (if that dog was
shedding parvovirus in his feces) -- he can be exposed.

Ask your vet about the new high-titer parvo vaccines that protect
puppies as young as 12 weeks against parvo (although it won't help
your puppy a whole lot ...)

BTW -- some dogs can not have any symptoms at all and still shed
parvovirus, which is one reason why it's so hard to prevent.

BUT ... find a park where there aren't a lot of other dogs. Maybe you
can find some tennis courts (completely fenced in) and go after dark,
or a baseball field when it's raining -- that way you've got a
relatively low risk of parvo, since these aren't common places to take
dogs. Remember to take a couple of baggies so you can "pick up" after
your dog -- not to prevent parvo, but because the presence of dog poop
in "human" parks is unwelcome and may result in "NO DOGS ALLOWED"
signs going up.

Or find a friend with a pup of similar age who has a fenced yard.

It's a relatively small risk -- but it *is* a risk. It's yours to
take. Personally, I took Joy to puppy kindergarten classes from 12
weeks on, knowing that it was a risk -- but I think the socialization
was worth the risk.


& Edric, the Wonder Mutt, Kati, the world's hairiest Akita,__     /|__
Joy "quit helping!", the Aussie sheep-***puppy          /  \___/ ^_/  
and Battlecat & Cringer, who don't like to be herded      \ \/     |  
(oh, yeah, there might be a husband under all the hair)    \ / --\ /
                                                           ||     ||

 
 
 

Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by DobeF » Fri, 09 Aug 1996 04:00:00


I have always been told that Parvo is an airborne virus, and can be
carried on clothes, shoes, etc., as well as being transmitted via direct
contact with infected feces.  
Mary alice

 
 
 

Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by Lynda Oleks » Wed, 14 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>I have always been told that Parvo is an airborne virus, and can be
>carried on clothes, shoes, etc., as well as being transmitted via direct
>contact with infected feces.  

Distemper virus can aerosolize (source: The Small Animal Veterinary
Nerdbook). But infection with parvovirus is fecal-***(source:
Ettinger's Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine second edition) --
although of course you *can* carry the virus on your clothes and shoes
if you've come in contact with feces from a dog shedding the virus --
this is one reason I would not only change clothes but bleach
*everything* when Kati was a puppy and I was working at a shelter. But
as far as I know (and I wouldn't swear to it, but I did check several
different references) -- parvovirus is *not* airborne.


& Edric, the Wonder Mutt, Kati, the world's hairiest Akita,__     /|__
Joy "quit helping!", the Aussie sheep-***puppy          /  \___/ ^_/  
and Battlecat & Cringer, who don't like to be herded      \ \/     |  
(oh, yeah, there might be a husband under all the hair)    \ / --\ /
                                                           ||     ||

 
 
 

Parvo virus and getting puppy to the park

Post by JJP » Thu, 15 Aug 1996 04:00:00


My vet strongly advised me to not allow the dog ANYWHERE another
domestic dog has been until completely immunized.  I followed the
advice, although I was very tempted to get the puppy out and socialized,
and I now have a healthy pet and I don't think she missed any
socialization.

Of course, I can't take her out now ... she broke her femur two weeks
ago and needs to stay quiet.  But, that's the 'breaks'.