propagating hardwood cuttings

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propagating hardwood cuttings

Post by Hatt » Sat, 18 May 1996 04:00:00



I've found it real easy to grow roses (old ramblers and some climbers)
from hardwood cuttings in the late fall.  Take cuttings from wood that
is from that year's growth, but which has already hardened - doesn't
need to look green - - dip in rooting hormone and stick in the dirt in
a lightly shaded spot and they will have new growth in the spring.
FWIW Grace

Fred and Grace Hatton, Hawley, PA

 
 
 

propagating hardwood cuttings

Post by Patrick J. Burk » Wed, 22 May 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I've found it real easy to grow roses (old ramblers and some climbers)
> from hardwood cuttings in the late fall.  Take cuttings from wood that
> is from that year's growth, but which has already hardened - doesn't
> need to look green - - dip in rooting hormone and stick in the dirt in
> a lightly shaded spot and they will have new growth in the spring.
> FWIW Grace

> Fred and Grace Hatton, Hawley, PA


Fred & Grace,

Do you mulch them, or bury them, or just let them sit out all winter?  
Also, since I'm unfamiliar, is Hawley in the zone 6 eastern end, or the
zone 5 western end?

--
Patrick Burke
Technical Writer/Training Specialist
Biological Sciences Division Academic Computing
The University of Chicago

5-1282

 
 
 

propagating hardwood cuttings

Post by DDiebo » Sat, 25 May 1996 04:00:00


Take a cutting with about 5 leaf eyes on it.  Strip the leaves from the
bottom three.  Cut an x in the end of the stem.  Smear Rootone all over
the stripped portion of the cutting.  Dig a hole deep enough to plant 3
eyes in and 2 above ground.  Mix the soil to go back in the hole with some
root stimulator fertilizer.

Cover the cutting with a plastic milk bottle with the bottom cut out.  Use
a coathanger or some kind of wire to hold the bottle onto the ground.
Water well and hope for the best.  I usually get about 75% success this
way.  

When the weather starts to warm in the spring take the cap off of the
bottle to keep the heat from building up too much.  If you can root them
where you want them to stay it is best but you can transplant them in the
spring if required

Doug Diebold