*** The General's Children (part 2) ***

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*** The General's Children (part 2) ***

Post by BCD » Mon, 05 Nov 2001 00:40:29



Sheer Force of Numbers:

The Immediate Progeny of

'Gnral Jacqueminot'

Through 1920

by

Brent C.***erson

Copyright 2001 Brent C.***erson

(Part 2)

A Few Notes

It is interesting to see the effect of 'Gnral Jacqueminot' in contributing
color to a cross. While crimson reds, maroons, and purples abound, as we
might expect, the General's commitment to shades of red is only a shallow
one; in the majority of crossings with other, non-red, parents, the General
surrenders his colors and the offspring are pink in various shades (for some
instances: 'Archiduchesse Marie Marguerite', 'Comte de Grassin', 'Dawson',
'Mme. Ballu', 'Triomphe des Noisettes'), or even (though one generation
removed) yellowish white in one exceptional case ('Lydia Grimm'). But the
General has sympathies this way even when left to himself; though there is
no way of knowing of whether they are selfings or outcrosses in which the
other parent is unknown (as, for instance, with open pollination), we do see
pinks in various shades among offspring in which 'Gnral Jacqueminot' is
the only recorded parent: 'Chevalier Nigra', 'Cora', 'Mlle. Louise Chrtien'
, 'Mlle. Marie Mtral', 'Mme. Rosalie de Wincop', 'Monsieur mile Lelong'.

Significant Hybrid Perpetual children of the General, such as 'Alfred Colomb
', 'Charles Lefebvre', 'Horace Vernet', 'Louis Van Houtte', 'Marie Baumann',
'Monsieur Bon?enne', 'Snateur Va?sse', 'Souvenir du Dr. Jamain', 'Xavier
Olibo', and several others-so important on the exhibition tables of
Victorian rosarians-constitute a group all to themselves, rich in comment
and literature. We leave these for another time, and place under the view of
the reader several roses which were, for one reason or another, unusual
among the progeny of 'Gnral Jacqueminot'; rather than extend this article
unnecessarily, for those roses given treatment in one or another of my books
I provide the reader a reference to the book in which fuller remarks may be
found.

. 'Albert la Blotais' (Pernet pre, 1887) HP cl.  'Gloire de Dijon' (N) x
GJ. One of several crosses over the years between HP and Noisette. As
described upon introduction (Journal des Roses [hereafter abbreviated JR]
11, p. 163):  "Vigorous plant; flower very large, nearly full, globular,
peduncle upright and strong, very good hold; of a beautiful bright red,
sometimes darker red passing to crimson . . . Freely remontant; plant of
premier merit." This rose is also seen spelled 'Albert la Blottais'.

. 'Comte de Grassin' (Corbouf-Marsault/Bruzeau-Proust, 1889) HP  GJ x 'La
France' (B). Interesting parentage, bringing together two noble but distinct
lines. As described upon introduction (JR13/165-166): "Flower large, full,
well formed, opening well, beautiful long bud, flowers in corymbs, color
deep pink shaded bright carmine, very fragrant and extremely floriferous;
bush vigorous."

. 'Daniel Lacombe' (Allard/Moreau-Robert, 1885) Mult  Sdlg. 'Polyantha Alba
Plena Sarmentosa' (Mult) x GJ. Full notes on this variety may be seen in The
Old Rose Adventurer, p. 335. The contribution of 'Gnral Jacqueminot' to
this is questionable, and indeed wasn't advanced evidently until some two
decades after introduction.

. 'Dawson' (Dawson/Strong, 1888) Mult  This American result of the selfing
of a seedling which itself arose from a cross of the Multiflora 'Polyantha'
and 'Gnral Jacqueminot' was described by G.A. Stevens (Climbing Roses,
1933) as: "The first authentic hybrid of R. multiflora made in America. The
blooms are bright pink, double, clustered, and come very early. Of
historical interest only."

.  'Dr. Reymont' (Algatire, 1888) Pol  GJ x a Polyantha.  Should we call
such a cross a Polyantha or an early Floribunda? Fuller notes will be found
in volume II of the second edition of The Old Rose Advisor, p. 153.

. 'Fimbriata' (J.C. Schmidt, 1901) HP  GJ x 'Turner's Crimson Rambler'
(Mult). Rather obscure, and of interesting parentage for something offered
as an HP, in 1906 the Journal des Roses (p. 16) describes it as, "Sparkling
scarlet red, the blossoms with fimbriated petals." Not to be confused with
the flesh-colored-and very pretty-Rugosa of the same name.

. 'Gipsy' (Laxton, 1884) HP  'Gloire de Dijon' (N) x either 'Souvenir du
Comte de Cavour' (HP) or GJ.  Released (see JR8/179) as: "Vigorous plant,
very floriferous; flower medium-sized, full, pale red. This variety,
exhibited to the Bedford Horticultural Society, was found to be very
beautiful." It may be compared to such roses as 'Albert la Blotais' or
'Reine Marie Henriette', and was probably a climbing HP.

. 'Grossherzog Ernst Ludwig von Hesse' (Mller/Lambert, 1898) HT  From
either GJ or 'Pierre Notting' x 'Marchal Niel' (N). Again, interesting
parentage! Fuller notes on this may be found in the second edition of The
Old Rose Advisor, volume II, p. 234.

. 'Grossherzogin Sophie Louise' (J.C. Schmidt, 1895) HP 'Baronne Adolphe de
Rothschild' (HP) x GJ.  Another obscure rose; but it brings onto the scene
yet another famous rose in its parentage, 'Baronne Adolphe de Rothschild',
usually called 'Baroness Rothschild' by Anglophones, which itself was from
the line of 'La Reine', that early HP from Laffay which set the HPs on the
road to ***. 'Grossherzogin Sophie Louise' was salmon in color.

. 'Luise Mller' (Mller/Lambert, 1897) HP cl.  Sdlg. (from 'Pierre Notting'
[HP] x 'Safrano' [T]) x Sdlg. (from GJ x 'Empereur du Maroc' [HP]).  The
strength of 'Safrano' as grandparent muscles out all the red, crimson, and
maroon contributed by the other forebears. Release notes (JR21/68) tell us
that, "This rose doesn't stop blooming from June until the onset of Winter's
frosts. It is bright red, and blooms in panicles. It is excellent budded
high. Unique among climbing roses."

. 'Lydia Grimm' (Geduldig, 1907) HT  Sdlg. (from GJ x 'Mme. Caroline Testout
' [HT]) x 'Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria' (HT).  See The Old Rose Adventurer, p.
421. In this, the General's coloration has been completely lost.

. 'Max Singer' (Lacharme, 1885) Lam  'Polyantha Alba Plena Sarmentosa'
(Mult) x GJ. Called a "Polyantha" upon introduction, no doubt in reference
not to what we understand as a Polyantha but rather to the big shrubby
Multiflora variety 'Polyantha' and its race, one of which was a parent of
this variety. It fits best into the Lambertiana group. Fuller notes may be
found in The Old Rose Adventurer, p. 359.

. 'Mme. Ballu' (Gravereaux/Cochet-Cochet, 1904) Rg  GJ x ('Souvenir de la
Malmaison' [B] x R. rugosa).  Branching out in another direction of
breeding, this Rugosa reminds us that the General played a part in the
ancestry of several Rugosa crosses. An entry on 'Mme. Ballu' may be found in
The Old Rose Adventurer, p. 234.

. 'Monsieur Clerc' (Vigneron, 1894) B  'Mrs. Bosanquet' (B) x GJ. In this,
the General returns to his Bourbon roots. As told in the release notes
(JR18/146): "Vigorous bush, beautiful dark green foliage, flower large or
medium-sized, full, cupped, beautifully colored sparkling velvety red . . .
It maintains the vigor and floriferousness of 'Mrs. Bosanquet' and the color
of 'Gnral Jacqueminot'."

. 'Pedro-Cost?' (da Costa, 1889) Pern  GJ x 'Harison's Yellow' (F). A
Portuguese variety which is unfairly obscure, as it is evidently the first
Pernetiana. As announced, "A very fortunate and unusual cross between two
differently-colored species now allows us to present fanciers of this
beautiful genus with a new rose having a completely novel coloration, a rose
which we put under the name 'Pedro-Cost?' to commemorate the name of its
breeder. This new rose, which constitutes a very distinctive race, comes
from crossing the rose 'Gnral Jacqueminot' with the rose 'Harisonii'
[i.e., 'Harison's Yellow']. The influence of the pollen parent (rose
'Harisonii') is manifested principally in the growth, form, and color of the
leaves; and from the rose 'Gnral Jacqueminot', it inherits the color of
the flower, somewhat modified. In a word, the rose 'Pedro-Cost?' thoroughly
resembles both the parents which gave it origin. Like the rose 'Harisonii',
it has slender, nodding canes covered with long straight ***les, which are
however shorter than those of this last. The leaves are willow-green,
slightly margined purple in youth. Flowers small, double, deep orange red in
color, on a yellow ground" (JR13/71-72). Further remarks will be found in my
book The Old Rose Index.

. 'Reine Marie-Henriette' (Levet, 1878) HT cl.  'Mme. Brard' (N) x GJ. This
well-known and important rose will be found described fully in the second
edition of The Old Rose Advisor, volume II, p. 122.

. 'Rose de Goubire' (Puyravaud, 1904) HT cl.  'Gloire de Dijon' (N) x GJ.
Yet another in the 'Albert la Blotais' category, Puyravaud released it as
(JR28/155) "Flower carmine pink, large, full, high center, well formed,
fading when fully open; bud oval; exquisite Centifolia perfume, the
distinction of this rose. Bush hardy, climbing, canes very strong, not many
thorns, ample foliage of a beautiful green."

. 'Triomphe de Pernet pre' (Pernet pre, 1890) HT  'Monsieur Dsir' (N) x
GJ. For once, Noisette x HP does not give us a climbing rose. Fuller notes
in The Old Rose Advisor, second edition, volume II, p. 293.

. 'Triomphe des Noisettes' (Pernet pre, 1887) N  GJ x 'Ophirie' (N). Back
to climbing for this sort of cross, once again fuller notes will be found in
the second edition of The Old Rose Advisor, volume II, p. 134.

. 'William C. Egan' (Dawson/Hoopes, 1900) W  R. wichuraiana x GJ. The
General's only dalliance with a Wichuraiana, remarks on the rose and the
fine American for whom it was named will be found in The Old Rose
Adventurer, p. 327.

The End.

Best Wishes,

--BCD

Web Site:  http://www.moonsgarden.com/~odinthor
Visit Unknown Los Angeles:  http://www.moonsgarden.com/~odinthor/socal1.html

 
 
 

*** The General's Children (part 2) ***

Post by Alice Flore » Fri, 09 Nov 2001 04:22:55




Quote:
> Sheer Force of Numbers:

> The Immediate Progeny of

> 'Gnral Jacqueminot'

> Through 1920

***** Yes!!!  Go Brent!  I've been waiting for this one.  I knew that
the General was the progenitor of a LOT of roses -- never had a good
list, though.  thankyouthankyou.  btw, the General himself does so
poorly in my yard that I can hardly justify keeping him -- but it is
such an important rose that I put up with the disease and dieback --
and then, every now and then, it throws out a huge, gloriously-colored,
hauntingly fragrant bloom and I love it all over again.
 
 
 

*** The General's Children (part 2) ***

Post by BCD » Mon, 12 Nov 2001 01:35:03



Quote:


> > Sheer Force of Numbers:
> > The Immediate Progeny of
> > 'Gnral Jacqueminot'
> > Through 1920

> ***** Yes!!!  Go Brent!  I've been waiting for this one.  I knew that
> the General was the progenitor of a LOT of roses -- never had a good
> list, though.  thankyouthankyou.  btw, the General himself does so
> poorly in my yard that I can hardly justify keeping him -- but it is
> such an important rose that I put up with the disease and dieback --
> and then, every now and then, it throws out a huge, gloriously-colored,
> hauntingly fragrant bloom and I love it all over again.

***Thanks!  Somehow it helps in understanding each member when a person sees
the whole clan cheek to jowl like this.  And maybe those breeding new
varieties will be able to construe some hints from pondering how the results
turn out when the General is crossed with different lines . . .

***Next in the spotlight will be . . . well . . . you'll see.    ;-)

Best Wishes,

--BCD

Home Site: http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor (has a picture of my new book "The
Old Rose Index," just released)
Visit old L.A.: http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor/socal1.html (now 17 exciting
episodes, cast of thousands)