Mulch choice - pinebark, cypress, hardwood; fine, medium, coarse?

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Mulch choice - pinebark, cypress, hardwood; fine, medium, coarse?

Post by Dilip Barm » Sun, 26 Feb 1995 02:40:41



I'm getting mulch for my new rose bed and the place I found that sells
it in bulk ($20 per cubic yard for pine and cypress, $15 for hardwood)
has a variety of mulches in a variety of sizes.  I was thinking of
going with medium or coarse, about 1-1.5" brickets.  I like the look of
the pine teh best - but will it acidify the soil?  If so, should I stick
with hardwood?

          Dilip
--
  Dilip Barman, Dept. of Computer Science
  University of North Carolina, CB 3175
  Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599    
  (919)962-1821, fax 962-1799

 
 
 

Mulch choice - pinebark, cypress, hardwood; fine, medium, coarse?

Post by b.. » Sat, 04 Mar 1995 22:54:48


No one has answered this (anyway public) yet
and I want to add my interest in the question.

Here are some questions in my mind about mulch for roses:

1) Should we really buy hardwood mulch  since hardwood is becoming rare?
2) Does lots of mulch harbour sickness and harmfull insects,
     read somewhere here that folks rince it in bleach (should use a chorine
    alternative thinking of baby seals and such..)

3) And as Barman asks, will the PH have an affect on the roses.

Sandra
Stockholm,
Sweden

 
 
 

Mulch choice - pinebark, cypress, hardwood; fine, medium, coarse?

Post by Jeffrey A. Del C » Sun, 05 Mar 1995 04:41:09



Quote:
>No one has answered this (anyway public) yet
>and I want to add my interest in the question.

>Here are some questions in my mind about mulch for roses:

>1) Should we really buy hardwood mulch  since hardwood is becoming rare?

Should we therefore throw it away? The mulch is a by-product; it isn't
the reason the trees are being cut.

Quote:
>2) Does lots of mulch harbour sickness and harmfull insects,
>     read somewhere here that folks rince it in bleach (should use a chorine
>    alternative thinking of baby seals and such..)

Never heard of sterilizing mulch with bleach, but if this was done, the
bleach would be de-activated pretty quickly

The only problem I've heard of is that the mulch might attract termites
or other wood-boring pests

Baby seals? (Unless the hardwood is made into clubs to kill them, I don't
see the connection here.)

Quote:
>3) And as Barman asks, will the PH have an affect on the roses.

Maybe, maybe not.  If so, it can be corrected fairly easily.  A lot depends
on original soil conditions.

J. Del Col
--
Jeff Del Col   * "Sleeplessness is like metaphysics.
A-B College    *  Be there."
Philippi, WV   *
               * ----Charles Simic----

 
 
 

Mulch choice - pinebark, cypress, hardwood; fine, medium, coarse?

Post by Lourain Penningt » Tue, 07 Mar 1995 04:37:32



Quote:
> No one has answered this (anyway public) yet
> and I want to add my interest in the question.

> Here are some questions in my mind about mulch for roses:

> 1) Should we really buy hardwood mulch  since hardwood is becoming rare?
> 2) Does lots of mulch harbour sickness and harmfull insects,
>      read somewhere here that folks rince it in bleach (should use a chorine
>     alternative thinking of baby seals and such..)

> 3) And as Barman asks, will the PH have an affect on the roses.

> Sandra
> Stockholm,
> Sweden

I live in an area where lumbering is a local industry. The most common
tree is oak, cut for barrel staves. Oaks are not rare in this area!
Hardwood mulch is a byproduct. You should try to use mulchs that are
readily available, so if hardwood mulch is made of a dwindling resource in
your area, you should definitely switch to something else.

The only insects I have ever found in new hardwood mulch were those
associated with decomposition of wood. I would be more careful if the
mulch came from an area with one of the foreign insect pests such as
Gypsy moth or Japanese beetles. Most areas have enough of their own pests
that you have to watch for insect pests anyway.

NO matter what type of mulch you use, you should check soil pH
periodically, and adjust to the proper pH. My oak mulch tends to acidify
the soil, but very slowly. I add lime as needed.

--
Lourain Pennington