Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

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Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Dazzle » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00



All this talk about dud roses made me think... Henry Mitchell tackled
the problem of growing roses that most people dont want. (Heres an
idea for a Garden Theme! What about a rose garden that is made up of
roses that nobody else can stand? This isnt a theme that has been
explored to any great extent, so theres lots of potential!) This from
Henry Mitchell on Gardening (ISBN 0-395-87821-7), pp. 100-1,  a
collection of Henry Mitchells entertaining gardening columns over the
years in the Washington Post.

------- quote -----------

Now that the sun is supposed to come out again, it appears the roses
have been gaining strength (and not rotting, as ones gloomy forebodings
suggested), and frankly there is some triumph in having Agalaia
blooming over an arch. All the best writers say it is not worth growing,
being pale and ineffectual, so naturally it was a rose I had to have.
Admittedly it did not bloom for two years, but now it is a mass of
primrose fading to white, far more delicate and refined than Goldfinch
and with a finer scent and glossier, more elegant foliage. Of course it
is pale if its primrose fading to white, and if you want purple and
gold it will not do at all. It is a child of the old noisette rose Reve
dOr.

Aglaia should not be recommended to anybody, necessarily, and it never
is. The flowers in small clusters are an inch and a half wide with
perhaps twenty-five small petals and a brush of orange-gold stamens in
the middle of the shallow saucer. It has only one flush of bloom, and
possibly small gardeners would do better to give an arch to a rose that
blooms off and on through the summer. Still, Aglaia is an important
rose, as ancestor of the so-called hybrid musks. Besides, whenever I
hear some flower dismissed as relatively worthless I am seized with an
urge to grow it.

--------------- end of quote -----------

 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by James Delahant » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>All this talk about dud roses made me think... Henry Mitchell tackled
>the problem of growing roses that most people dont want.

I have a few roses that would fit that category--John S. Armstrong, Porto
Rico,
and Lemon Spice, which has been through the cycle of introduction, fadeaway
and
revival.  I bought it about twenty-two years ago as part of one of the J&P
fragrance groups; it has survivied terrible neglect, drought, and occasional
kicking in its career.
It does have a lemon spice, blooms prodigiously, but the blooms 'blow' very
quickly.
This past year it was reintroduced by a couple of nurseries--including
Arena, and I
wondered why.  While it is a perfectly nice rose, I could not see any
features that warranted restoration,but there it was and there it is.  I
don't know if Yankee Doodle
qualifies as a rose nobody wants, but I have that, too.  JimD
 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Dazzle » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> >  I
> don't know if Yankee Doodle
> qualifies as a rose nobody wants, but I have that, too.

*** Do you want it?
 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by James Delahant » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>> >  I
>> don't know if Yankee Doodle
>> qualifies as a rose nobody wants, but I have that, too.

>*** Do you want it?

An interesting question.  I  _keep_ it because it was a gift of a friend and
although
the friend is now a thousand miles away (albeit not literally), it is a
reminder of better
and happier days.  As a rose per se, it is a virused plant that looks
terrible in spring;
there is no scent whatever that I can detect, and the blooms get blowsy very
quickly.
And yet....the sentimental value outweighs the detriments noted above.   I
also keep
Mme Louis Lavecque which is really unsuitable for my purposes--it balls
something terrible,  is a space eater, and the rebloom is so sparse as to be
non-existant; but, again, it is a 'memory' rose of a friendship of over
forty years standing....

Okay, the answer is yes.

JimD

 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Dazzle » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Okay, the answer is yes.

I figured we'd get it out of you... eventually...
 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Pat Walke » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Hey Dazzler,  Mitchell sounds like a man after my own heart.  What a coincidence
that I was looking at his books two weeks ago in the bookstore, trying to decide
if I wanted to try them.  (I've never gotten the Washington Post).  Cheapness
prevailed that day, but the next time I have some "disposable" income, I'll have
to try one or two.  I think there are two or three collections of essays.

I too am drawn to things no-one else wants to grow.  Why else American Pillar?
and a whole bunch of once blooming climbers and ramblers?  that mildew magnet
Permanent Wave?   All the Teas and chinese roses I can afford?  Singles galor!
Fleeting blooming species roses!   The list goes on and on.  In fact, nothing
turns me more off to a rose than a glossy article in the Jacson Perkins catalog.
Almost didn't get Sunrunner because of it.  (very nice groundcover BTW).


Quote:

>All this talk about dud roses made me think... Henry Mitchell tackled
>the problem of growing roses that most people dont want. (Heres an
>idea for a Garden Theme! What about a rose garden that is made up of
>roses that nobody else can stand? This isnt a theme that has been
>explored to any great extent, so theres lots of potential!) This from
>Henry Mitchell on Gardening (ISBN 0-395-87821-7), pp. 100-1,  a
>collection of Henry Mitchells entertaining gardening columns over the
>years in the Washington Post.

>------- quote -----------

>Now that the sun is supposed to come out again, it appears the roses
>have been gaining strength (and not rotting, as ones gloomy forebodings
>suggested), and frankly there is some triumph in having Agalaia
>blooming over an arch. All the best writers say it is not worth growing,
>being pale and ineffectual, so naturally it was a rose I had to have.
>Admittedly it did not bloom for two years, but now it is a mass of
>primrose fading to white, far more delicate and refined than Goldfinch
>and with a finer scent and glossier, more elegant foliage. Of course it
>is pale if its primrose fading to white, and if you want purple and
>gold it will not do at all. It is a child of the old noisette rose Reve
>dOr.

>Aglaia should not be recommended to anybody, necessarily, and it never
>is. The flowers in small clusters are an inch and a half wide with
>perhaps twenty-five small petals and a brush of orange-gold stamens in
>the middle of the shallow saucer. It has only one flush of bloom, and
>possibly small gardeners would do better to give an arch to a rose that
>blooms off and on through the summer. Still, Aglaia is an important
>rose, as ancestor of the so-called hybrid musks. Besides, whenever I
>hear some flower dismissed as relatively worthless I am seized with an
>urge to grow it.

>--------------- end of quote -----------

pat walker
zone 9/10 Coastal Calif.
 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Dazzle » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hey Dazzler,  Mitchell sounds like a man after my own heart.  What a coincidence
> that I was looking at his books two weeks ago in the bookstore, trying to decide
> if I wanted to try them.  (I've never gotten the Washington Post).  Cheapness
> prevailed that day, but the next time I have some "disposable" income, I'll have
> to try one or two.  I think there are two or three collections of essays.

Next chance you get, you should try one of his books. They're alternately funny,
informative, sentimental, you name it! He had a small garden in the Washington area
that was chock full of all sorts of plants -- from the way he describes it, he
must've crammed all sorts of things in there, way more than you'd think would fit.
The essays are beautifully written, too.
 
 
 

Aglaia or Growing Roses Most People Don't Want to Grow

Post by Jeffrey A. Del C » Fri, 09 Jul 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>> Hey Dazzler,  Mitchell sounds like a man after my own heart.  What a coincidence
>> that I was looking at his books two weeks ago in the bookstore, trying to decide
>> if I wanted to try them.  (I've never gotten the Washington Post).  Cheapness
>> prevailed that day, but the next time I have some "disposable" income, I'll have
>> to try one or two.  I think there are two or three collections of essays.

>Next chance you get, you should try one of his books. They're alternately funny,
>informative, sentimental, you name it! He had a small garden in the Washington area
>that was chock full of all sorts of plants -- from the way he describes it, he
>must've crammed all sorts of things in there, way more than you'd think would fit.
>The essays are beautifully written, too.

Yes, Henry Mitchell was a first class horticultural writer.  Too bad there'll
be no more of him.

J. Del Col
--
Summer's bright weight lies light
on cicadas shrilling under its heat,
Seven*** years' burden of clay and darkness
for a few loud weeks of sun and air.