Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Description of your first forum.

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Mary Winters-Mey » Fri, 05 Apr 1996 04:00:00



Hi All!

This seems like a real friendly NG. I've only been reading for a couple days,
and I know it's recommended to read longer than that before posting, but
I have a question that I don't think can wait! The other day at our grocery
store I fell in love with a couple miniature roses in the plant section and let
my impulsive nature take over. I now have two tiny pots and I have no idea
how to take care of roses! Never had them before.

I'm following the directions on the little tags, keeping them in a southern
window and keeping the soil moist at all times, but I'm not sure what else to
do. Should I cut off the flower heads when they start to fade? Also, each pots
seems to have 4 different plants in it. In fact, one of the plants in the "pink"
pot is a different color than the rest. I thought if I could get the plants a little
bushier, I could separate them out and have 8 roses instead of 2. But I don't
want to cut off all the lovely buds that haven't bloomed yet. Any advice
would be welcome.

Oh yes, the tags say they were grown in Canada (my mom thinks they're from
her birthplace - what a coincidence!) and are hardy in many areas in Canada.
I don't really want to plant them outdoors, however, since we don't have a
good southern bed that I can see from my window - I want to enjoy these as
much as possible!

My other question is with regard to hedge roses - I would really love to get
some to plant around our eyesore of a gas tank, but my hubby refuses to get
anything with thorns, since he would have to mow around them. Are there
hedge roses that don't have thorns? I've heard of thornless roses, but I always
thought they were the greenhouse, fragile, used for cut flowers variety.
Anyone know any different?

Thanks for putting up with my long, rambling post! And TIA for any advice!

Mary
Possibly another rose convert... ;->


University of Illinois |  Management Methods Analyst
Urbana - Champaign     |  Department of Student Financial Aid

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Victoria Mitchel » Sat, 06 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Mary, regarding your "hedge rose" question--how high is your gas tank?  Seems like
maybe you could plant a (or however-many) tall shrub/short climber or "pillar
rose". You might be able to train them to grow over/cover the gas tank. There is
one that might meet your needs perfectly: 'Zephrine Drouhin', a Bourbon.  I think
that the Bourbons are quite hardy, having a large dose of old European Garden rose
in their genetic make-up; they are certainly not "fragile greenhouse" roses.  
Z.D.(a rather bright pink) and her paler-pink sport Kathleen Harrop (sp?) are, for
some reason, completely thornless; also fragrant.  These roses--esp. Z.D.,
apparently quite popular-- are carried by a number of rose suppliers.  The only
negative thing I've read about Z.D. and her sports is that they're rather prone to
mildew, at least if they're grown so that they don't have good air circulation.

Happy rose hunting, and I won't be at all surprised if you become another rose
convert--or should I say ***.  (Watch out!)
Victoria

Quote:
>[snip]
>My other question is with regard to hedge roses - I would really love to get
>some to plant around our eyesore of a gas tank, but my hubby refuses to get
>anything with thorns, since he would have to mow around them. Are there
>hedge roses that don't have thorns? I've heard of thornless roses, but I always
>thought they were the greenhouse, fragile, used for cut flowers variety.
>Anyone know any different?

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Kay Cange » Sat, 06 Apr 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> There is
> one that might meet your needs perfectly: 'Zephrine Drouhin', a
Bourbon.  I think
> that the Bourbons are quite hardy, having a large dose of old European
garden rose
> in their genetic make-up; they are certainly not "fragile greenhouse" roses.  

Zephrine Drouhin is not very hardy beyond Zone 6.  Since the goal is to
cover an eyesore, winter die-back would be a definite negative. Bourbons
as a class vary in hardiness between zone 6 and zone 5. We can grow them,
but need to be careful with our selections.

Kay Cangemi
New York, USDA zone 5

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Gretchen Jorgens » Sat, 06 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Hi Mary -

: I have a question that I don't think can wait! The other day at our grocery
: store I fell in love with a couple miniature roses in the plant section and let
: my impulsive nature take over. I now have two tiny pots and I have no idea
: how to take care of roses! Never had them before.

: I'm following the directions on the little tags, keeping them in a southern
: window and keeping the soil moist at all times, but I'm not sure what else to
: do. Should I cut off the flower heads when they start to fade? Also, each pots
: seems to have 4 different plants in it. In fact, one of the plants in the "pink"
: pot is a different color than the rest. I thought if I could get the plants a little
: bushier, I could separate them out and have 8 roses instead of 2. But I don't
: want to cut off all the lovely buds that haven't bloomed yet. Any advice
: would be welcome.

Do cut off the old flowers when they fade - this will encourage new growth/
blooms.  Just cut off the flowers 1/4" above a group of 5 leaflets facing
towards the outside of the plant.

I haven't separated minis before - there has been some discussion of this
on the group as of late, so hopefully an expert will chime in!

: Oh yes, the tags say they were grown in Canada (my mom thinks they're from
: her birthplace - what a coincidence!) and are hardy in many areas in Canada.
: I don't really want to plant them outdoors, however, since we don't have a
: good southern bed that I can see from my window - I want to enjoy these as
: much as possible!

Eventually you will probably want to plant them outdoors.  It is difficult
to grow roses well inside the house, because most home environments don't
provide enough humidity or light for the plants to do well long-term.  
However, you should be able to keep the plants healthy until planting
season in your area.  You can always get some new minis next year to
have some color in the house during the winter/spring! :-)

[snippage about thornless roses - my plants all have plenty of thorns!]

Gretchen Jorgensen

Fort Collins CO  USDA Zone 5

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by CLBart » Mon, 08 Apr 1996 05:00:00


Quote:
Mary Winters-Meyer writes:
>My other question is with regard to hedge roses - I would really love to
get
>some to plant around our eyesore of a gas tank, but my hubby refuses to
get
>anything with thorns, since he would have to mow around them. Are there
>hedge roses that don't have thorns? I've heard of thornless roses, but I

always thought they were the greenhouse, fragile, used for cut flowers
variety.
Quote:
>Anyone know any different?

Here's a suggestion for a less-thorny hedge I heard recently-- R.
***iana.  pink, spring blooming, red shoots, good fall color and hips.
Hardy in this area but haven't grown it or seen it.  Anyone have anymore
info?

Lynn, No. Illinois, Zone 4b

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Steve Cange » Tue, 09 Apr 1996 04:00:00



|> My other question is with regard to hedge roses - I would really love to get
|> some to plant around our eyesore of a gas tank, but my hubby refuses to get
|> anything with thorns, since he would have to mow around them.

For this purpose, in addition to thornlessness, I would want a fuss free
rose.  Albas come to mind.  They feature beautiful, well scented white or
pink flowers and beautiful foliage.  In winter you will see that even the
canes are attractive.  `Chloris' is virtually thornless and has a fairly
erect habit.  Most other Albas are quite smooth caned, and have a more
arching habit.  Another advantage is they grow quite large.  Most get to
be about person height.

I hadn't thought of Rosa ***iana.  There is a single bush growing around
here amid the legions of Multiflora, and the occasional Canina.  I'll check
it out.

Steven in the Mid-Hudson Valley
USDA Zone 5

where the current stars in the garden are the Iris Reticulata.  Today I
suppose they are peeking through snow.

--

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Mack Stephens » Tue, 09 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>>My other question is with regard to hedge roses - I would really love to get
>>some to plant around our eyesore of a gas tank, but my hubby refuses to get
>>anything with thorns, since he would have to mow around them. Are there
>>hedge roses that don't have thorns?

I have an eyesore of a gas tank myself, and long ago planted
a Betty Prior at the end that mattered, and I no longer see that
gas tank.  I would have planted them all around it, but there's
this thing about being able to get to it.  Outblooms any rose,
period, and grows like a weed, who could ask for more.  Ya want
more?  It doesn't hurt me and seldom even hooks me when I walk by it,
and inevitably brush up against it, which is often.  Still more:
the buds on it--you'll have a hard time not eating them.

lms

 
 
 

Miniatures & Hedge Roses - a lurker's ?s

Post by Victoria Mitchel » Wed, 10 Apr 1996 04:00:00


I'm glad Kay caught my message--I wouldn't want to mislead anyone out of my
own ignorance.  I didn't realize that Bourbons were not that hardy -- I had
thought of Zephrine Drouhin because of the lack of thorns.  Being in Zone 8,
my perceptions of hardiness can be a little fuzzy, plus I'm still a neophyte
at all this.  I try to remember to preface any suggestions I dare to offer
with the caveat that I'm still just learning.  And I'm certainly learning a
lot from people on this list!  It's a wonderful resource.

How about the Hybrid Perpetuals?  At least *some* of them are quite hardy are
they not?  And I know there a few HP varieties with very few thorns.  I have a
Reine des Violettes and a Mrs. John Laing, which, while not thornless, have
small, relatively harmless little spines.

I thought of another possibility, after going home and seeing it: Schoener's
Nutkana.  Very smooth canes, vigorous grower and I would *think* it would be
quite hardy.  It's a cross between the species R. nutkana and a HP--Paul
Neyron, I think.  I love the big, single, fragrant pink flowers.  It's a
once-bloomer, but it also seems to need no special care.

Quote:

>Zephrine Drouhin is not very hardy beyond Zone 6.  Since the goal is to
>cover an eyesore, winter die-back would be a definite negative. Bourbons
>as a class vary in hardiness between zone 6 and zone 5. We can grow them,
>but need to be careful with our selections.