rooting hardwood cuttings

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rooting hardwood cuttings

Post by Hatt » Mon, 31 Jul 1995 04:00:00



Someone mentioned that commercial rose growere perhaps bud onto field
grown rootstock that are propagated by hardwood cutting.  I may not be
remembering this correctly, but if that is true, how does one start
roses from wood that is is older?

Also when attempting to root softwood cuttings, the expression "strip
off the lower two sets of leaves" was used.  Am I assuming that one
cuts these off, rather than ripping.  Also does anyone know if keeping
cuttings that one has collected in a cooler or refrigerator will in
any way inhibit their growth?

Grace Hatton, Hawley, PA

 
 
 

rooting hardwood cuttings

Post by Karen Baldw » Tue, 01 Aug 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> Also when attempting to root softwood cuttings, the expression "strip
> off the lower two sets of leaves" was used.  Am I assuming that one
> cuts these off, rather than ripping.

personally, i've always stripped them away by hand, gently breaking
them away in a downward motion ... mine, at least, come away cleanly
without trouble.  i suppose one could carefully cut them away to the
same effect, should you see them pulling away strips from the stem.

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rooting hardwood cuttings

Post by Mel Hul » Wed, 02 Aug 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>> Also when attempting to root softwood cuttings, the expression "strip
>> off the lower two sets of leaves" was used.  Am I assuming that one
>> cuts these off, rather than ripping.

>personally, i've always stripped them away by hand, gently breaking
>them away in a downward motion ... mine, at least, come away cleanly
>without trouble.  i suppose one could carefully cut them away to the
>same effect, should you see them pulling away strips from the stem.

Naah!  Carefully pull them off.  You want to leave no competition
with the bud inside the leaf set.
 
 
 

rooting hardwood cuttings

Post by Cathy E Bey » Wed, 02 Aug 1995 04:00:00


: Someone mentioned that commercial rose growere perhaps bud onto field
: grown rootstock that are propagated by hardwood cutting.  I may not be
: remembering this correctly, but if that is true, how does one start
: roses from wood that is is older?

Rosa multiflora will root easily from cuttings, including hardwood
cuttings.  Some roses with a great deal of multiflora in the background
will do the same.  Don't bother trying to root hardwood cuttings of HTs
and other modern roses in your climate.

: Also when attempting to root softwood cuttings, the expression "strip
: off the lower two sets of leaves" was used.  Am I assuming that one
: cuts these off, rather than ripping.

If you cut the leaves off you will leave behind a stub that will invite
fungus, which may rot into the cutting itself.  Better to pull the leaves
off in a downward motion.

: Also does anyone know if keeping
: cuttings that one has collected in a cooler or refrigerator will in
: any way inhibit their growth?

This is done with wood for budding all the time.  You can also hold leafy
cuttings for a few days this way before sticking them, but it is better
to stick them as soon as possible.

Cathy in MA z/5

 
 
 

rooting hardwood cuttings

Post by George Morris » Wed, 02 Aug 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>Someone mentioned that commercial rose growere perhaps bud onto field
>grown rootstock that are propagated by hardwood cutting.  I may not be
>remembering this correctly, but if that is true, how does one start
>roses from wood that is is older?
>Also when attempting to root softwood cuttings, the expression "strip
>off the lower two sets of leaves" was used.  Am I assuming that one
>cuts these off, rather than ripping.  Also does anyone know if keeping
>cuttings that one has collected in a cooler or refrigerator will in
>any way inhibit their growth?

Hardwood cuttings seem to take a little longer to root for me.
I clip off the leaves, I don't rip them.
I think it depends on the sturdiness of the variety. I have managed to
grow several old & species roses from dead-looking cuttings that sat,
unwatered, in the trunk of a hot car for two days. And I have failed
to get other, pampered, cuttings to grow.
Good Luck --- Helen