Rose Hardwood Cuttings

Description of your first forum.

Rose Hardwood Cuttings

Post by Brian Coo » Tue, 26 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Winter has come to Toronto and I would like to try my hand at hardwood
cuttings.

Is it too early to start?
If not, would the cuttings still require a cold period or can I start
rooting them inside under lights now?

Thank You
--
        Brian Cook                              

        Toronto Ontario

        "Over The Garden Wall" Some Money Saving Ideas For The Garden
                        http://www.interlog.com/~bcook

 
 
 

Rose Hardwood Cuttings

Post by cbuz » Tue, 10 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Brian,
I have had great success just taking the cuttings, dipping the ends in
rooting hormone, sticking them in a pot with moist potting soil, covering
them with a plastic bag,(no air holes) and forgetting about them for 6 to 7
weeks. So for I have rooted everything I treated this way. Most of my roses
are old garden types. I place mine outside on a shelf or on the ground in
some sun but not full. I live in zone 8 so it is still in the 70's here. I
don't know what your temp. is. Now is the perfect time to root roses. This
is a good time to dig runners from rugosa roses too.
Claire:-)



Quote:
> Winter has come to Toronto and I would like to try my hand at hardwood
> cuttings.

> Is it too early to start?
> If not, would the cuttings still require a cold period or can I start
> rooting them inside under lights now?

> Thank You
> --
>    Brian Cook                              

>    Toronto Ontario

>    "Over The Garden Wall" Some Money Saving Ideas For The Garden
>                    http://www.interlog.com/~bcook

 
 
 

Rose Hardwood Cuttings

Post by Kay Cange » Tue, 10 Dec 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> Brian,
> I have had great success just taking the cuttings, dipping the ends in
> rooting hormone, sticking them in a pot with moist potting soil, covering
> them with a plastic bag,(no air holes) and forgetting about them for 6 to 7
> weeks. So for I have rooted everything I treated this way. Most of my roses
> are old garden types. I place mine outside on a shelf or on the ground in
> some sun but not full. I live in zone 8 so it is still in the 70's here. I
> don't know what your temp. is. Now is the perfect time to root roses. This
> is a good time to dig runners from rugosa roses too.
> Claire:-)



> > Winter has come to Toronto and I would like to try my hand at hardwood
> > cuttings.

> > Is it too early to start?
> > If not, would the cuttings still require a cold period or can I start
> > rooting them inside under lights now?

OK, you've dragged me out from under whatever rock I was hiding under for
this one.

I don't exactly live in Toronto, but I think I can relate to the weather
there:) The method Claire is describing is fairly standard procedure for
*softwood* cuttings. I personally have not had good luck with softwood
cuttings taken here after about early September. Also, even if you get one
to take, it has to be kept inside, under lights, until it can be planted
out in late April. A just rooted cutting would never survive outside.
Tenderer varieties won't necessarily survive their first winter even if
they have all summer to grow. Will they survive inside? I'll tell you in
March. I've got three sitting in pots in the ba***t.

We are trying our luck at hardwood cuttings for the first time this winter.
Steve planted a little forest of Jacques Cartier cuttings when we had to
cut down the main plant to move it. The Jacques Cartiers have been joined
by a couple of found Alba cuttings that we had no luck with this summer as
softwood cuttings.

From what I have read of the process (I am very open to corrections here:))
hardwood cuttings first need to form a callus, which can take a very long
time. This is where roots will form. Cold is involved in this somewhere,
but it could simply be that it prevents the cutting from rot. The cuttings
do not need a humid area, but are simply stuck into fairly well draining
ground.

There are many books on propagating. Watch where they are published. A lot
of the are British and designed for a much milder climate than much of the
US (and Canada) possesses. Any book the talks about a frost free cold frame
isn't talking about this climate.

Kay Cangemi
New York, USDA Zone 5