Hybrid or Species?

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Hybrid or Species?

Post by Diana Kulag » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 05:29:48



Hi, All,

I recently acquired Bulb. dearei "Golden Dragon" x Bulb. dearei "Soft Red".
If I am reading this correctly, someone was able to name two species plants
(by getting awarded?) and then the two were crossed.

I hope this isn't a really dumb question, but don't you still end up with a
species plant?  When does the species name disappear in the naming?

Diana

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by woodwar » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 08:16:13


The result is still the species, but the fact that the parents are both
select may produce a particular effect in the progeny.  When the cross is
between different species or to a hybrid, then the species name may be lost.
Until it is named it is still written as a cross between the two parents --
species parent x hybrid, etc.
Ken Woodward
Newton, MA
http://kwoodward.net


Quote:
> Hi, All,

> I recently acquired Bulb. dearei "Golden Dragon" x Bulb. dearei "Soft
Red".
> If I am reading this correctly, someone was able to name two species
plants
> (by getting awarded?) and then the two were crossed.

> I hope this isn't a really dumb question, but don't you still end up with
a
> species plant?  When does the species name disappear in the naming?

> Diana

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Ray » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 09:42:24


Expanding on Ken's accurate response in an effort to make it even clearer,
you own the species Bulb. dearei ('Golden Dragon' x 'Soft Red'), and you can
name yours Bulb. dearei "whateveryouwant', if you choose to do so.

--

Ray Barkalow <> First Rays orchids
http://www.firstrays.com
Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!


Quote:
> The result is still the species, but the fact that the parents are both
> select may produce a particular effect in the progeny.  When the cross is
> between different species or to a hybrid, then the species name may be
lost.
> Until it is named it is still written as a cross between the two
parents --
> species parent x hybrid, etc.
> Ken Woodward
> Newton, MA
> http://kwoodward.net



> > Hi, All,

> > I recently acquired Bulb. dearei "Golden Dragon" x Bulb. dearei "Soft
> Red".
> > If I am reading this correctly, someone was able to name two species
> plants
> > (by getting awarded?) and then the two were crossed.

> > I hope this isn't a really dumb question, but don't you still end up
with
> a
> > species plant?  When does the species name disappear in the naming?

> > Diana

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Diana Kulag » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 09:59:01


Thanks.  Guess I was on the right track.

Diana



Quote:
> Expanding on Ken's accurate response in an effort to make it even clearer,
> you own the species Bulb. dearei ('Golden Dragon' x 'Soft Red'), and you
can
> name yours Bulb. dearei "whateveryouwant', if you choose to do so.

> --

> Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> http://www.firstrays.com
> Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > The result is still the species, but the fact that the parents are both
> > select may produce a particular effect in the progeny.  When the cross
is
> > between different species or to a hybrid, then the species name may be
> lost.
> > Until it is named it is still written as a cross between the two
> parents --
> > species parent x hybrid, etc.
> > Ken Woodward
> > Newton, MA
> > http://kwoodward.net



> > > Hi, All,

> > > I recently acquired Bulb. dearei "Golden Dragon" x Bulb. dearei "Soft
> > Red".
> > > If I am reading this correctly, someone was able to name two species
> > plants
> > > (by getting awarded?) and then the two were crossed.

> > > I hope this isn't a really dumb question, but don't you still end up
> with
> > a
> > > species plant?  When does the species name disappear in the naming?

> > > Diana

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Mick Fournie » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 11:49:15


Long live Species.

Mick
www.OrchidFlask.com

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by George Wilkin » Sun, 16 Jun 2002 21:09:44


Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
explain.................
What is a species
            and what constitutes a hybrid
thanks
george
 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Reka » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 00:33:50


Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A species is a
plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name is the
genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name, like
"stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The genus is
always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross between two
species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis stuartiana x
Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal. Twilight x
Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an "epithet",
a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple Gem.  The
fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a hybrid is
known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are hybrids
which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

Did I forget anything?
--
Reka
http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
"I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models and they
don't move."
       --Georgia O'Keeffe


Quote:
> Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> explain.................
> What is a species
>             and what constitutes a hybrid
> thanks
> george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Ray » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 04:54:43


Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later on - there
are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny breeding
true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a hybrid, on
the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the other.

--

Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
http://www.firstrays.com
Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!


Quote:
> Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A species is a
> plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name is the
> genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name, like
> "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The genus
is
> always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross between
two
> species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis stuartiana
x
> Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal. Twilight
x
> Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
"epithet",
> a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple Gem.
The
> fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a hybrid is
> known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are hybrids
> which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

> Did I forget anything?
> --
> Reka
> http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models and
they
> don't move."
>        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> > explain.................
> > What is a species
> >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> > thanks
> > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Diana Kulag » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 06:36:31


Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you can't
just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in the case
of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean it's
recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
orchid-grubbing habits?

For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this thread:
there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it then
possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now name
the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make lots
of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more and
more species plants.

TIA.

Diana



Quote:
> Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later on -
there
> are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

> I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny breeding
> true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a hybrid,
on
> the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the other.

> --

> Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> http://www.firstrays.com
> Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A species is
a
> > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name is
the
> > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name, like
> > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The genus
> is
> > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross between
> two
> > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
stuartiana
> x
> > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
Twilight
> x
> > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
> "epithet",
> > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple Gem.
> The
> > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a hybrid
is
> > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
hybrids
> > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

> > Did I forget anything?
> > --
> > Reka
> > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models and
> they
> > don't move."
> >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> > > explain.................
> > > What is a species
> > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> > > thanks
> > > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Ray » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 06:51:16


Diana,

Anyone may give a name to an unnamed plant.  My comment on the dearei is
correct.

If you are showing it, it MUST have a name.  (Or maybe, if the AOS awards
it, it must.)

--

Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
http://www.firstrays.com
Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!


Quote:
> Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you can't
> just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in the
case
> of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

> Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean it's
> recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
> orchid-grubbing habits?

> For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this thread:
> there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it then
> possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now name
> the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

> This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make lots
> of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
> especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more and
> more species plants.

> TIA.

> Diana



> > Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later on -
> there
> > are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

> > I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny breeding
> > true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a
hybrid,
> on
> > the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the other.

> > --

> > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> > http://www.firstrays.com
> > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A species
is
> a
> > > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name is
> the
> > > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name,
like
> > > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The
genus
> > is
> > > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross
between
> > two
> > > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
> stuartiana
> > x
> > > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
> Twilight
> > x
> > > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
> > "epithet",
> > > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple Gem.
> > The
> > > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a hybrid
> is
> > > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> > > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
> hybrids
> > > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

> > > Did I forget anything?
> > > --
> > > Reka
> > > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> > > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models and
> > they
> > > don't move."
> > >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> > > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> > > > explain.................
> > > > What is a species
> > > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> > > > thanks
> > > > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Diana Kulag » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 10:08:42


Ray,

Does one then need to register the name?  Or is that not possible unless the
plant is somehow recognized?  Not trying to be a pain here, honestly.  Just
seems that it would be the Wild, Wild West if everyone could coin their own
names without some kind of sanction.

On the other hand, what's wrong with the Wild, Wild  West ............

Meanwhile, I am hard at work thinking up the right name for that pretty
little Bulbo.  Maybe I'll start a contest, with Frank's best pate as the
prize (oops - better check with Frank!).  Maybe a jar of Frank & Di's best
barbeque rub instead?

Diana



Quote:
> Diana,

> Anyone may give a name to an unnamed plant.  My comment on the dearei is
> correct.

> If you are showing it, it MUST have a name.  (Or maybe, if the AOS awards
> it, it must.)

> --

> Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> http://www.firstrays.com
> Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you
can't
> > just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in the
> case
> > of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

> > Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean
it's
> > recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
> > orchid-grubbing habits?

> > For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this thread:
> > there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it
then
> > possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now
name
> > the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

> > This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make
lots
> > of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
> > especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more and
> > more species plants.

> > TIA.

> > Diana



> > > Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later on -
> > there
> > > are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

> > > I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny
breeding
> > > true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a
> hybrid,
> > on
> > > the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the
other.

> > > --

> > > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> > > http://www.firstrays.com
> > > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > > > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A
species
> is
> > a
> > > > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name
is
> > the
> > > > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name,
> like
> > > > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The
> genus
> > > is
> > > > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross
> between
> > > two
> > > > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
> > stuartiana
> > > x
> > > > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
> > Twilight
> > > x
> > > > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
> > > "epithet",
> > > > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple
Gem.
> > > The
> > > > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a
hybrid
> > is
> > > > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> > > > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
> > hybrids
> > > > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

> > > > Did I forget anything?
> > > > --
> > > > Reka
> > > > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> > > > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models
and
> > > they
> > > > don't move."
> > > >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> > > > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> > > > > explain.................
> > > > > What is a species
> > > > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> > > > > thanks
> > > > > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Wend » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 11:36:08


Ok Diana, you are on.......how about
"Moving Dragon"
This could be fun.
Cheers Wendy

Quote:
> Ray,

> Does one then need to register the name?  Or is that not possible unless
the
> plant is somehow recognized?  Not trying to be a pain here, honestly.
Just
> seems that it would be the Wild, Wild West if everyone could coin their
own
> names without some kind of sanction.

> On the other hand, what's wrong with the Wild, Wild  West ............

> Meanwhile, I am hard at work thinking up the right name for that pretty
> little Bulbo.  Maybe I'll start a contest, with Frank's best pate as the
> prize (oops - better check with Frank!).  Maybe a jar of Frank & Di's best
> barbeque rub instead?

> Diana



> > Diana,

> > Anyone may give a name to an unnamed plant.  My comment on the dearei is
> > correct.

> > If you are showing it, it MUST have a name.  (Or maybe, if the AOS
awards
> > it, it must.)

> > --

> > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> > http://www.firstrays.com
> > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > > Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you
> can't
> > > just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in
the
> > case
> > > of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

> > > Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean
> it's
> > > recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
> > > orchid-grubbing habits?

> > > For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this thread:
> > > there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it
> then
> > > possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now
> name
> > > the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

> > > This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make
> lots
> > > of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
> > > especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more
and
> > > more species plants.

> > > TIA.

> > > Diana



> > > > Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later
on -
> > > there
> > > > are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

> > > > I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny
> breeding
> > > > true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a
> > hybrid,
> > > on
> > > > the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the
> other.

> > > > --

> > > > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> > > > http://www.firstrays.com
> > > > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> > > > > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A
> species
> > is
> > > a
> > > > > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species
name
> is
> > > the
> > > > > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name,
> > like
> > > > > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The
> > genus
> > > > is
> > > > > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross
> > between
> > > > two
> > > > > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
> > > stuartiana
> > > > x
> > > > > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
> > > Twilight
> > > > x
> > > > > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
> > > > "epithet",
> > > > > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple
> Gem.
> > > > The
> > > > > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a
> hybrid
> > > is
> > > > > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> > > > > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
> > > hybrids
> > > > > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

> > > > > Did I forget anything?
> > > > > --
> > > > > Reka
> > > > > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> > > > > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models
> and
> > > > they
> > > > > don't move."
> > > > >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> > > > > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> > > > > > explain.................
> > > > > > What is a species
> > > > > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> > > > > > thanks
> > > > > > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Susan Erickso » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 12:05:21


There are 2 different names involved with plants.

 1> if a species or hybrid and I wish to name THIS particular
plant it is a clone name such as Den species 'Pretty Lady' then
the name is attached to that plant and any pieces that go off the
main plant (keiki or division)

 2> if a hybrid that I made and it has never been registered by a
prior hybridizer, I may choose the name such as Den Pretty Lady.
If I then name a clone I would have Den Pretty Lady 'Dancer'
and I have chosen both the hybrid's name and the plant's clone
name.

The rules on assigning a clone name are mostly - don't copy
anyone else's for that plant.  This is just between you and the
plant unless you need to do it to get an award registered.

The rules for the hybrid include being the one to hybridize the
plant &/or having gotten an award and wanting it names but not
being able to find out who hybridized it. Being willing to pay to
fee... ya, that too.

SuE

On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 01:08:42 GMT, "Diana Kulaga"

Quote:

>Ray,

>Does one then need to register the name?  Or is that not possible unless the
>plant is somehow recognized?  Not trying to be a pain here, honestly.  Just
>seems that it would be the Wild, Wild West if everyone could coin their own
>names without some kind of sanction.

>On the other hand, what's wrong with the Wild, Wild  West ............

>Meanwhile, I am hard at work thinking up the right name for that pretty
>little Bulbo.  Maybe I'll start a contest, with Frank's best pate as the
>prize (oops - better check with Frank!).  Maybe a jar of Frank & Di's best
>barbeque rub instead?

>Diana



>> Diana,

>> Anyone may give a name to an unnamed plant.  My comment on the dearei is
>> correct.

>> If you are showing it, it MUST have a name.  (Or maybe, if the AOS awards
>> it, it must.)

>> --

>> Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
>> http://www.firstrays.com
>> Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



>> > Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you
>can't
>> > just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in the
>> case
>> > of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

>> > Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean
>it's
>> > recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
>> > orchid-grubbing habits?

>> > For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this thread:
>> > there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it
>then
>> > possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now
>name
>> > the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

>> > This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make
>lots
>> > of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
>> > especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more and
>> > more species plants.

>> > TIA.

>> > Diana



>> > > Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later on -
>> > there
>> > > are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

>> > > I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny
>breeding
>> > > true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a
>> hybrid,
>> > on
>> > > the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the
>other.

>> > > --

>> > > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
>> > > http://www.firstrays.com
>> > > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



>> > > > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A
>species
>> is
>> > a
>> > > > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species name
>is
>> > the
>> > > > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species name,
>> like
>> > > > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).  The
>> genus
>> > > is
>> > > > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross
>> between
>> > > two
>> > > > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
>> > stuartiana
>> > > x
>> > > > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
>> > Twilight
>> > > x
>> > > > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
>> > > "epithet",
>> > > > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple
>Gem.
>> > > The
>> > > > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a
>hybrid
>> > is
>> > > > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
>> > > > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
>> > hybrids
>> > > > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go, guys?

>> > > > Did I forget anything?
>> > > > --
>> > > > Reka
>> > > > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
>> > > > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than models
>and
>> > > they
>> > > > don't move."
>> > > >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


>> > > > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
>> > > > > explain.................
>> > > > > What is a species
>> > > > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
>> > > > > thanks
>> > > > > george

 
 
 

Hybrid or Species?

Post by Ray » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 20:43:09


Sue reminded me of a point I meant to make in my previous post - if a clonal
name is already attached to a plant, it is considered improper to rename it,
its divisions or keikies.

--

Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
http://www.firstrays.com
Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!


Quote:
> There are 2 different names involved with plants.

>  1> if a species or hybrid and I wish to name THIS particular
> plant it is a clone name such as Den species 'Pretty Lady' then
> the name is attached to that plant and any pieces that go off the
> main plant (keiki or division)

>  2> if a hybrid that I made and it has never been registered by a
> prior hybridizer, I may choose the name such as Den Pretty Lady.
> If I then name a clone I would have Den Pretty Lady 'Dancer'
> and I have chosen both the hybrid's name and the plant's clone
> name.

> The rules on assigning a clone name are mostly - don't copy
> anyone else's for that plant.  This is just between you and the
> plant unless you need to do it to get an award registered.

> The rules for the hybrid include being the one to hybridize the
> plant &/or having gotten an award and wanting it names but not
> being able to find out who hybridized it. Being willing to pay to
> fee... ya, that too.

> SuE

> On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 01:08:42 GMT, "Diana Kulaga"

> >Ray,

> >Does one then need to register the name?  Or is that not possible unless
the
> >plant is somehow recognized?  Not trying to be a pain here, honestly.
Just
> >seems that it would be the Wild, Wild West if everyone could coin their
own
> >names without some kind of sanction.

> >On the other hand, what's wrong with the Wild, Wild  West ............

> >Meanwhile, I am hard at work thinking up the right name for that pretty
> >little Bulbo.  Maybe I'll start a contest, with Frank's best pate as the
> >prize (oops - better check with Frank!).  Maybe a jar of Frank & Di's
best
> >barbeque rub instead?

> >Diana



> >> Diana,

> >> Anyone may give a name to an unnamed plant.  My comment on the dearei
is
> >> correct.

> >> If you are showing it, it MUST have a name.  (Or maybe, if the AOS
awards
> >> it, it must.)

> >> --

> >> Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> >> http://www.firstrays.com
> >> Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> >> > Ray, back to the top for a minute.  It was my understanding that you
> >can't
> >> > just name a plant at will, but you need to have been awarded (or in
the
> >> case
> >> > of a hybrid, I guess it's different).

> >> > Well, I guess one COULD name it anything you want, but does that mean
> >it's
> >> > recognized by anyone other than the people who put up with our
> >> > orchid-grubbing habits?

> >> > For example, the dearei grex that I mentioned in starting this
thread:
> >> > there is no notation that either parent has been awarded.  So, is it
> >then
> >> > possible that both parents were arbitrarily named, and that I can now
> >name
> >> > the resulting plant, still using the species as a reference point?

> >> > This may seem arcane to some, but I like to get things right.  I make
> >lots
> >> > of mistakes, but when I can I try to get the info I need.  And it's
> >> > especially helpful since I'm trying to lean in the direction of more
and
> >> > more species plants.

> >> > TIA.

> >> > Diana



> >> > > Not bad, Reka, but I think you'll find that - as you stated later
on -
> >> > there
> >> > > are plants found in the wild that are hybrids.

> >> > > I believe it has something to do with the traits of the progeny
> >breeding
> >> > > true, which in a species, should give you more of the same.  In a
> >> hybrid,
> >> > on
> >> > > the other hand, you can get traits more toward one parent or the
> >other.

> >> > > --

> >> > > Ray Barkalow <> First Rays Orchids
> >> > > http://www.firstrays.com
> >> > > Secure Online Ordering & Lots of Free Info!



> >> > > > Oooh!  Finally I question I can answer at least a part of.  A
> >species
> >> is
> >> > a
> >> > > > plant you could find growing naturally in the wild.  A species
name
> >is
> >> > the
> >> > > > genus, like "Phalaenopsis", followed by the specific species
name,
> >> like
> >> > > > "stuartiana". (all together the "botanical" or "latin" name).
The
> >> genus
> >> > > is
> >> > > > always capitalized, the second part is not.  A hybrid is a cross
> >> between
> >> > > two
> >> > > > species, a species and a hybrid, or two hybrids.  (Phalaenopsis
> >> > stuartiana
> >> > > x
> >> > > > Phalaenopsis amabilis, Phal. amabilis x Phal. Purple Gem or Phal.
> >> > Twilight
> >> > > x
> >> > > > Phal. Purple Gem)  A hybrid name is the genus name followed by an
> >> > > "epithet",
> >> > > > a fantasy name registered by its hybridizer, such as Phal. Purple
> >Gem.
> >> > > The
> >> > > > fantasy name is always capitalized.  If it is not registered, a
> >hybrid
> >> > is
> >> > > > known by a name such as those in parantheses above.
> >> > > > Now what always confuses me are the "natural" hybrids.  Those are
> >> > hybrids
> >> > > > which have occurred naturally in the wild.  How do those go,
guys?

> >> > > > Did I forget anything?
> >> > > > --
> >> > > > Reka
> >> > > > http://www.rolbox.it/hukari/index.html
> >> > > > "I hate flowers - I paint them because they're cheaper than
models
> >and
> >> > > they
> >> > > > don't move."
> >> > > >        --Georgia O'Keeffe


> >> > > > > Starting at the beginning for a complete novice, please
> >> > > > > explain.................
> >> > > > > What is a species
> >> > > > >             and what constitutes a hybrid
> >> > > > > thanks
> >> > > > > george