They're all cattleyas now

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They're all cattleyas now

Post by K Barret » Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:29:54



In case you didn't see this on the OGD, Cassio van den Berg moved everything
but Rhyncholaelia, Guarianthe and the Mexican Laelias into Cattleya.
http://www.neodiversity.org/articles/neod3102.pdf or if that doesn't work
then try http://www.neodiversity.org/latestarticles.html

I asked about L. tenebrosa and got the answer that he puts tenebrosa and
lobata etc as varieties of purpurata.

I understand he'll be lumping those debatable epidendrums early next year.

On a different subject I noticed 'Neodiversity' is an electronic publication
that will send printed papers to libraries etc but who basically use
electronic means to disseminate their articles...I thought someone one got
in trouble for using an electronic publication to publish their work.... was
it Braeme?  or the kovachii mess?  That a hard copy had to be made......?
But what do I know.  Maybe the few hard copies they send to whatever
libraries they use is sufficent for the taxonomy gods.  I could be
completely misremembering.

K Barrett

 
 
 

They're all cattleyas now

Post by K Barret » Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:30:59


Oops or brassavola... well maybe I shouldn't have said "everything".  He
moved what he moved, *G*.

K


Quote:
> In case you didn't see this on the OGD, Cassio van den Berg moved
> everything but Rhyncholaelia, Guarianthe and the Mexican Laelias into
> Cattleya. http://www.neodiversity.org/articles/neod3102.pdf or if that
> doesn't work then try http://www.neodiversity.org/latestarticles.html

> I asked about L. tenebrosa and got the answer that he puts tenebrosa and
> lobata etc as varieties of purpurata.

> I understand he'll be lumping those debatable epidendrums early next year.

> On a different subject I noticed 'Neodiversity' is an electronic
> publication that will send printed papers to libraries etc but who
> basically use electronic means to disseminate their articles...I thought
> someone one got in trouble for using an electronic publication to publish
> their work.... was it Braeme?  or the kovachii mess?  That a hard copy had
> to be made......? But what do I know.  Maybe the few hard copies they send
> to whatever libraries they use is sufficent for the taxonomy gods.  I
> could be completely misremembering.

> K Barrett

 
 
 

They're all cattleyas now

Post by Andre » Tue, 29 Jul 2008 14:09:57



Quote:
> On a different subject I noticed 'Neodiversity' is an electronic publication
> that will send printed papers to libraries etc but who basically use
> electronic means to disseminate their articles...I thought someone one got
> in trouble for using an electronic publication to publish their work.... was
> it Braeme?  or the kovachii mess?  That a hard copy had to be made......?

I'd be interested to know whether this was the case. So long as it's
peer reviewed, which the Neodiversity home page implies it is,  there
should be no problem with publishing manuscripts in an electronic
journal. There does seem to be a bit of reluctance particularly
amongst older scientists to see them on equal weighting as 'hard copy'
journals in terms of impact and credibility. However, the fact that
most of the larger journals are publishing online these days and
libraries are starting to cut back on hard copies in favour of
electronic access makes me think that the naysayers are simply
unwilling to embrace new technology. Given the amount of taxonomic
research being published in very low impact factor journals (many of
these journals are little more than herbarium-based outlets for staff
to publish their results) I'm not sure taxonomists can afford to be
too picky.
 
 
 

They're all cattleyas now

Post by K Barret » Wed, 30 Jul 2008 00:13:55



Quote:

>> On a different subject I noticed 'Neodiversity' is an electronic
>> publication
>> that will send printed papers to libraries etc but who basically use
>> electronic means to disseminate their articles...I thought someone one
>> got
>> in trouble for using an electronic publication to publish their work....
>> was
>> it Braeme?  or the kovachii mess?  That a hard copy had to be made......?

> I'd be interested to know whether this was the case. So long as it's
> peer reviewed, which the Neodiversity home page implies it is,  there
> should be no problem with publishing manuscripts in an electronic
> journal. There does seem to be a bit of reluctance particularly
> amongst older scientists to see them on equal weighting as 'hard copy'
> journals in terms of impact and credibility. However, the fact that
> most of the larger journals are publishing online these days and
> libraries are starting to cut back on hard copies in favour of
> electronic access makes me think that the naysayers are simply
> unwilling to embrace new technology. Given the amount of taxonomic
> research being published in very low impact factor journals (many of
> these journals are little more than herbarium-based outlets for staff
> to publish their results) I'm not sure taxonomists can afford to be
> too picky.

I think you're right Andrew.
K