Hardwood Cuttings?

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Hardwood Cuttings?

Post by glas » Mon, 31 Jul 2000 04:00:00



I am fairly new to gardening so some of the terms and procedures are beyond
my knowledge at this point.

Recently, I have developed a strong desire to add a couple of
Rose-Of-Sharon's to my collection. I have read and been told by others that
you can sprout these from cuttings taken off of mature plants. An article in
the Time-Life plant encyclopedia says that Hardwood cuttings may be taken in
mid summer to start new plants.

Could anyone tell me how to go about doing this? My neighbor has several of
these lovely shrubs and has agreed to let me take some of his but I want to
do it right so it won't be wasted.

Thanks in advance.
glas

 
 
 

Hardwood Cuttings?

Post by glas » Mon, 31 Jul 2000 04:00:00



| Every spring I have to do some major pruning of the shrubs and trees,
| including my Roses of Sharon.  I just put the cuttings in a brush pile in
a
| hidden corner of my yard (if someone complains, I tell'em it's my
long-term
| compost heap).  Well, a couple of weeks later, I needed some sticks to
train
| my morning glories onto my trellises, so I got some from the brush pile,
cut
| them to the length I needed, and jammed them into the ground.
|
| A couple of weeks later, the sticks are putting out new growth!  Voila!
| Accidental propagation of rose of Sharon hardwood cuttings!
|
| Object of this story is to tell you that these are some of the easiest
| plants to propagate - just take a cutting and put it in a pot (actually,
| it's better to take many more cuttings than you think you need, because
some
| will inevitably fail on the way to becoming established new plants).
|
| An even better approach to Rose of Sharon propagation is to ask your
| neighbor if you can look around under and in the vicinity of his/her Roses
| of Sharon.  Bet you you'll find more than a couple of "volunteers" -
plants
| that have come up from seeds dropped by the existing plants.  Rose of
Sharon
| is a notorious self-seeder, so unless your neighbor is a very meticulous
| weeder, you should find some volunteers.  If you do, just dig them out
with
| a trowel - staying 3 - 4" away from the plant and going about 6" deep (to
| ensure you get as much of the young root system as possible), then just
| plant them where you want them in your yard.  Keep them watered for a week
| or so to enable the roots to get established in their new location, and
| within 3 years you'll have a 6-9' tall Rose of Sharon.

Thanks! I will give this a try. My neighbor is more than willing to allow me
to scope out his yard for new growth and I will do so. I'm really looking
forward to having a few of these for myself since the flowers are so lovely.

I intend to keep them rather small. I read in the plant encyclopedia that if
you cut them back in the spring they will stay small but have bigger
flowers.

I've also seen some other hibiscus that appealed to me so we will probably
have several by the end of next season.

How did your morning glories come out? I have a beautiful Grandpa Ott
growing up an apple tree in my back yard and a couple of mixed colors
growing up the side of my front porch. These have the hugest leaves I have
ever seen on a morning glory - some are a good 8" across! Not much in the
way of blooms yet but there are a ton of new beginning buds within the last
few days so they are probably just reacting to a late start since I didn't
get them in till almost June.

I also was concerned that perhaps the spot I chose for them was too nitrogen
rich because I've read that if morning glories get too much nitrogen they
will produce a lot of leafy growth instead of flowers so I have tried to
adjust that and will see how it goes.

glas <- loves morning glory

|
| Another note:  Roses of Sharon can be trained to either be shrub form
(their
| natural inclination) or tree form (which is what I prefer).  If you opt
for
| the latter, watch your young plants and pinch out branching that will
occur
| low on the plant, allowing the main trunk to grow.  Then each spring,
pinch
| off all the leaves and branches that want to grow low on the plant, and it
w
| ill develop into a nice small, flowering tree.
|
| Good luck!
|
| Gandy
|
| >I am fairly new to gardening so some of the terms and procedures are
beyond
| >my knowledge at this point.
| >
| >Recently, I have developed a strong desire to add a couple of
| >Rose-Of-Sharon's to my collection. I have read and been told by others
that
| >you can sprout these from cuttings taken off of mature plants. An article
| in
| >the Time-Life plant encyclopedia says that Hardwood cuttings may be taken
| in
| >mid summer to start new plants.
| >
| >Could anyone tell me how to go about doing this? My neighbor has several
of
| >these lovely shrubs and has agreed to let me take some of his but I want
to
| >do it right so it won't be wasted.
| >
| >Thanks in advance.
| >glas
| >
| >
|
|

 
 
 

Hardwood Cuttings?

Post by Gandy Dance » Tue, 01 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Every spring I have to do some major pruning of the shrubs and trees,
including my Roses of Sharon.  I just put the cuttings in a brush pile in a
hidden corner of my yard (if someone complains, I tell'em it's my long-term
compost heap).  Well, a couple of weeks later, I needed some sticks to train
my morning glories onto my trellises, so I got some from the brush pile, cut
them to the length I needed, and jammed them into the ground.

A couple of weeks later, the sticks are putting out new growth!  Voila!
Accidental propagation of Rose of Sharon hardwood cuttings!

Object of this story is to tell you that these are some of the easiest
plants to propagate - just take a cutting and put it in a pot (actually,
it's better to take many more cuttings than you think you need, because some
will inevitably fail on the way to becoming established new plants).

An even better approach to Rose of Sharon propagation is to ask your
neighbor if you can look around under and in the vicinity of his/her Roses
of Sharon.  Bet you you'll find more than a couple of "volunteers" - plants
that have come up from seeds dropped by the existing plants.  Rose of Sharon
is a notorious self-seeder, so unless your neighbor is a very meticulous
weeder, you should find some volunteers.  If you do, just dig them out with
a trowel - staying 3 - 4" away from the plant and going about 6" deep (to
ensure you get as much of the young root system as possible), then just
plant them where you want them in your yard.  Keep them watered for a week
or so to enable the roots to get established in their new location, and
within 3 years you'll have a 6-9' tall Rose of Sharon.

Another note:  Roses of Sharon can be trained to either be shrub form (their
natural inclination) or tree form (which is what I prefer).  If you opt for
the latter, watch your young plants and pinch out branching that will occur
low on the plant, allowing the main trunk to grow.  Then each spring, pinch
off all the leaves and branches that want to grow low on the plant, and it w
ill develop into a nice small, flowering tree.

Good luck!

Gandy

Quote:

>I am fairly new to gardening so some of the terms and procedures are beyond
>my knowledge at this point.

>Recently, I have developed a strong desire to add a couple of
>Rose-Of-Sharon's to my collection. I have read and been told by others that
>you can sprout these from cuttings taken off of mature plants. An article
in
>the Time-Life plant encyclopedia says that Hardwood cuttings may be taken
in
>mid summer to start new plants.

>Could anyone tell me how to go about doing this? My neighbor has several of
>these lovely shrubs and has agreed to let me take some of his but I want to
>do it right so it won't be wasted.

>Thanks in advance.
>glas

 
 
 

Hardwood Cuttings?

Post by Gandy Dance » Thu, 03 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Have a look:  (This is previous year's pic - they won't be like that this
year for a couple more weeks)

http://image8.photoloft.com/Image.asp?s=plft&u=53828&a=39824&i=276099

I'd always read that you plant'em in "average" soil...and the soil under my
trellises couldn't get *more* average!  Only problem I've had is leaves
yellowing...so this year, at the risk of having fewer blooms, I'm hitting'em
with Miracle Grow ever time they start looking a little pale!  One of the
main reasons for the trellises and morning glories was for privacy in the
late summer/fall...so if I sacrifice a few blooms, so be it.  Foliage is
really lookin' good so far!

Gandy

Quote:

>How did your morning glories come out?
<pruned>
>glas <- loves morning glory

 
 
 

Hardwood Cuttings?

Post by glas » Thu, 03 Aug 2000 04:00:00



| Have a look:  (This is previous year's pic - they won't be like that this
| year for a couple more weeks)
|
| http://image8.photoloft.com/Image.asp?s=plft&u=53828&a=39824&i=276099
|
| I'd always read that you plant'em in "average" soil...and the soil under
my
| trellises couldn't get *more* average!  Only problem I've had is leaves
| yellowing...so this year, at the risk of having fewer blooms, I'm
hitting'em
| with Miracle Grow ever time they start looking a little pale!  One of the
| main reasons for the trellises and morning glories was for privacy in the
| late summer/fall...so if I sacrifice a few blooms, so be it.  Foliage is
| really lookin' good so far!

I started a few morning glory this year and then almost changed my mind
about putting them in. I left the little seedlings sitting on the back porch
and practically ignored them for about a month while I planted all the rest
of my flower beds and finally felt sorry for them and decided to plant them
as a reward for surviving the abuse. The only spot I could find was at the
side of my front porch where the soil really stinks because it has never
been used as a growing spot and I basically just dug a hole and stuck them
in.

They are growing really well so far. I have been told that morning glory
dont flower very well if you fertilize them so I stopped giving mine
anything but water and now they are blooming beautifully.

glasgurl

|
| Gandy
|
| >How did your morning glories come out?
| <pruned>
| >glas <- loves morning glory
|
|