Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

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Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by jaz » Sun, 13 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
(peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

Thanks much,
jazz

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Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by Raaswom » Sun, 13 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Check out rec.food.preserving
There's a lot of hubbub about safe canning of salsa.  Also check Deja for
historical posts on tomatoes and salsa.
I'm so confused and paranoid, I pressure can tomato products.
Quote:
>Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
>veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
>depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
>know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
>usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

>Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
>(peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
>assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
>salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

>Thanks much,
>jazz

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by Jay He » Sun, 13 Aug 2000 04:00:00


In article <minortheobviousspamblockseventh-


Quote:
> Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
> veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
> depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
> know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
> usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

Just add a tablespoon of bottled lemon juice to each pint and you'll be
safe regardless of the tomato variety.  Use bottled juice because the pH
is adjusted for consistency.  With fresh you can't be sure of the pH
without testing.  Be aware the USDA has increased safe processing times
for several tomato canning methods (cut, whole, with juice, etc.) to 85
minutes.

Quote:
> Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
> (peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
> assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
> salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

Unfortunately, your assumption is not correct.  It's not a matter of the
tomato juice soaking into anything.  It's the pH (acidity level) of the
whole batch that matters.  You need to have the pH below 4.6 to safely
use boiling water bath (BWB) canning methods.  The tomatoes are already
considered borderline (hence the addition of lemon juice for safety).  
Adding less acidic veggies into the mix raises the overall pH to well
above 4.6.

For salsa you really need to follow a recipe that has been tested as safe
for canning.  You need to follow the recipe EXACTLY.  You can't safely
add just a little bit more of this or that and still be sure the salsa
will be safe to can.  Check here for lots of good info:
http://www.foodsafety.ufl.edu/consumer.htm.  If you dig through the
tomato recipes on that site there are two salsa-like recipes (I think one
is called Mexican Tomato Sauce), one that can be canned with BWB and one
that requires pressure canning.  I strongly recommend you follow one or
both of these recipes.  If you want to add other ingredients, do so right
before serving, not in the prepared mixture.  

Cilantro is an ingredient that is much better added right before serving.  
It doesn't hold up well to canning and has a tendency to turn a rather
unappetizing brown color over time.

Check the rec.food.preserving newsgroup for lots of additional info.  
Everyone over there will be more than happy to help you with your salsa
questions.  

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by Zaphod & Trillia » Sun, 13 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Most modern varieties are too low in acid to boil safely.  Add some
white vinegar if you do not want to pressure process.  Botulinis
intoxication is pretty mean.  Or- when you use the canned food, boil
for 15 minutes before eating.  That gets rid of the toxin.

Quote:

> Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
> veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
> depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
> know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
> usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

> Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
> (peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
> assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
> salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

> Thanks much,
> jazz

> --
> 8-)
> to reply, remove the obvious spam block

--

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-Old Arab Proverb

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by Fran Higha » Mon, 14 Aug 2000 04:00:00


The importance of an acid environment is to prevent the incidence of
botulism (it doesn't survive in an acid enironment).

If you aren't sure if your tomatoes are one of the higher acid varieties
(and some of the newer strains are reputed to be low acid) add a quarter of
a teaspoon of citric acid to each 1 lb of tomatoes.

Beyond that I suspect that it won't really matter how you process them, but
I'm sure others may have a different view.

Fran

ip.psi.net...

Quote:
> Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
> veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
> depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
> know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
> usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

> Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
> (peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
> assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
> salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

> Thanks much,
> jazz

> --
> 8-)
> to reply, remove the obvious spam block

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by Setzle » Mon, 14 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Tomatoes are border line acid enough for water bath, and there are a few toms
that are low acid, but not any on the market for gardeners. But the USDA made
new guide lines for tomato canning longer times, adding lemon juice, and
pressure canning. Go to rec. food preserving, and read the faq .
susan
Quote:

> Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
> veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
> depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
> know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
> usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

> Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
> (peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
> assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
> salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

> Thanks much,
> jazz

> --
> 8-)
> to reply, remove the obvious spam block

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by The Coo » Mon, 14 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods, and
>veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
>depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
>know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I grow the
>usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

>Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
>(peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
>assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
>salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

>Thanks much,
>jazz

Go read the threads on canning salsa in rec.food.preserving.  The word
is do not can salsa unless you are using a USDA approved recipe.  Get
a copy of the Ball Blue Book available where ball jars are found or
http://www.foodsafety.ufl.edu/index.html or
http://www.ext.usu.edu/publica/foodpubs.htm

Canning is not difficult if you understand the reasons for how things
are done.  But if you have not read come current information, you
could end up with botulism.

Find out how to do it safely!!
Susan N.

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by jaz » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 13:27:04


Thanks much to you (and everyone) for the info on canning. I expect the
approved recipes for cannable salsa will not be nearly hot enough for my
taste, so it seems like I should think about pressure canning (seems you
can get a good one for a bit over $100). I presume (I know, that's
dangerous) that anything is safe with pressure canning done following
guidelines.

Jazz

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8-)
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Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by David J. Brauneg » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00


The heat is no problem.  As long as you don't change the *quantity* of
peppers in an approved recipe, you can change the *variety* of peppers.
So, swap out the peppers in the recipe for ones that are as hot as you
like.

Utah State University has updated the USDA Complete Guide to Home
Canning with some extra salsa recipes.  See

http://www.ext.usu.edu/publica/foodpubs.htm

To follow up on your other comment, anything is safe with boiling water
bath or with pressure canning *if* it is done following approved
recipes, guidelines, and techniques.

It probably has been suggested, but take a look at dejanews for the
recent threads on rec.food.preserving about canning salsa.

Dave

Quote:

> Thanks much to you (and everyone) for the info on canning. I expect the
> approved recipes for cannable salsa will not be nearly hot enough for my
> taste, so it seems like I should think about pressure canning (seems you
> can get a good one for a bit over $100). I presume (I know, that's
> dangerous) that anything is safe with pressure canning done following
> guidelines.

> Jazz

> --
> 8-)
> to reply, remove the obvious spam block

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by jaz » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> The heat is no problem.  As long as you don't change the *quantity* of
> peppers in an approved recipe, you can change the *variety* of peppers.
> So, swap out the peppers in the recipe for ones that are as hot as you
> like.

Great idea, and I'll check out your link...

Jazz

 
 
 

Canning and tomatoes: high vs. low acid canning

Post by mre.. » Mon, 21 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I purchased The Ball Blue Book-Guide To Home Canning...
It states that you should add 1T of lemon juice to each pint of tomato
juice or 1/4 t citric acid. An article was in our paper today from the
county extension office that says the same thing.

In this same book it does not say to add lemon juice to salsa.  I
assume there must be enough acid during the cooking process.

You might want to get this book.  The copyright is 1999 so it is up to
date.

Melodie

In article <minortheobviousspamblockseventh-


Quote:
> Checking a few websites, fruits can be canned by the boiling methods,
and
> veggies need pressure canning. Tomatoes are listed in both categories,
> depending on whether they are high or low acid varieties. How does one
> know? None of the websites say how to determine which you have. I
grow the
> usaul beefsteak, big boy, etc.

> Also, I'm canning salsa, which has ingredients other than tomatoes
> (peppers, onions, peppers, garlic, peppers, cilantro, peppers). I'm
> assuming if I can go with the boiling method, it will be ok to can the
> salsa that way too since everything soaks in the tomato juice.

> Thanks much,
> jazz

> --
> 8-)
> to reply, remove the obvious spam block

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