Confused about mulching

Description of your first forum.

Confused about mulching

Post by stephen otrembi » Tue, 03 Nov 1998 04:00:00



Mulch for perenials is actually helping the plants more in the spring than
during the winter.  Mulch helps keep the soil temperature constant ... helping
to prevent soil heaving and tearing of roots... in the spring when temperatures
 vary significantly warming of the soil and root zone can encourage early
budding....a frost after the buds have come out can be catastrophic to the
plant or it's ability to fruit this season.
 
 
 

Confused about mulching

Post by Don Chapma » Wed, 04 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Just as a point of interest, I've been taking soil temperatures with a
probe as part of some experiments.  I was very surprised to find that the
soil in asparagus beds underneath mulch was warmer than bare soil this past
spring.  That was opposite of what I expected.  There were six degrees
difference.

I believe the mulch retains heat better overnight than does bare soil,
although mulched soil would not warm up as quickly on a sunny day.  The
comments about preventing fluctuations is certainly right, but assuming
that bare soil is warmer than covered soil is not always true, at least in
my observations.

--

Bio/Organics Supply Center
3200 Corte Malpaso, #107
Camarillo CA 93012 (Near ocean N. of LA)
<http://www.bio-organics.com>



Quote:
> Mulch for perenials is actually helping the plants more in the spring
than
> during the winter.  Mulch helps keep the soil temperature constant ...
helping
> to prevent soil heaving and tearing of roots... in the spring when
temperatures
>  vary significantly warming of the soil and root zone can encourage early
> budding....a frost after the buds have come out can be catastrophic to
the
> plant or it's ability to fruit this season.

 
 
 

Confused about mulching

Post by Paul Onsta » Thu, 05 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Just as a point of interest, I've been taking soil temperatures with a
> probe as part of some experiments.  I was very surprised to find that the
> soil in asparagus beds underneath mulch was warmer than bare soil this past
> spring.  That was opposite of what I expected.  There were six degrees
> difference.

> I believe the mulch retains heat better overnight than does bare soil,
> although mulched soil would not warm up as quickly on a sunny day.  The
> comments about preventing fluctuations is certainly right, but assuming
> that bare soil is warmer than covered soil is not always true, at least in
> my observations.

Hum? Could be. I'd appreciate any news of more experiments.

Mulching still seems to have solved my problems with "February Tulips" --
perhaps just by forming a physical barrier that reminds them, "go slow, it
could drop to zero again in a few more days."

I suppose also it depends on just what temperature signals plants react
to--such as indications of direct sunlight. The process could be more complex
than we think.

  -Paul