grape leaves: ok to eat?

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grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Elizabeth Moer » Wed, 05 May 1999 04:00:00



I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for sure what
type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine? Or are
stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

Thanks!
Love,
EF

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Travis Salin » Wed, 05 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for sure what
> type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine? Or are
> stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

We've used several different varieties of grape leaves for cooking.  So far no one
has keeled over.  ;-)

Travis
===============================================

Sumner, Washington   USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 4

http://www.rainyside.com/
Two Rainy Side Gardeners - Pacific NW Gardening
===============================================

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Heather Fin » Wed, 05 May 1999 04:00:00


If the grape leaves are thin and tender, then they are probably OK to
eat. If, however, they are the "thick" variety with a fuzzy whitish
underside then they are no good.

Ed


Quote:
> I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for sure
what
> type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine?
Or are
> stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

> Thanks!
> Love,
> EF

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Gary Coope » Thu, 06 May 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for sure what
> type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine? Or are
> stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

> EF

I'm glad you asked that. As I understand it, the leaves of any grapevine
that produces edible grapes are edible and may be used for dolma, grape
leaf salad, etc.

On the other hand, there is a special variety of grapevine grown just for
the leaves. A friend of mine has one of these. Some Palestinian friends
gave her a couple of stem cuttings, she stuck them the ground, and now she
has vines all over her back fence. This plant blooms like normal grapes,
but doesn't produce fruit, just leaves that are unusually tender and
tangy. It also seems to be highly resistant to iron-deficiency chlorosis,
which is extremely common in grapevines in our area.

Gary

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Dan Parke » Thu, 06 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:


>I'm glad you asked that. As I understand it, the leaves of any grapevine
>that produces edible grapes are edible and may be used for dolma, grape
>leaf salad, etc.

>On the other hand, there is a special variety of grapevine grown just for
>the leaves. A friend of mine has one of these. Some Palestinian friends
>gave her a couple of stem cuttings, she stuck them the ground, and now she
>has vines all over her back fence. This plant blooms like normal grapes,
>but doesn't produce fruit, just leaves that are unusually tender and
>tangy. It also seems to be highly resistant to iron-deficiency chlorosis,
>which is extremely common in grapevines in our area.

>Gary

Good point on the iron-deficiency chlorosis Gary.  I've got 48 vines out
back (Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Blanc, and a host of hybrid varieties) that
are just now beginning to show symptoms consistent with this malady.  I
guess it's time to get out back (it has stopped raining, hasn't it?) and
"iron" the grapes ;-)

Dan

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Bruce Harve » Fri, 07 May 1999 04:00:00


I use leaves from our Thompson seedless grape vine. Pick them in
the spring, when they've reached full size.  I freeze them in
large containers and then boil them for a couple minutes before
stuffing.  They're very tender, much better than the bottled,
brined ones!

Susan Harvey

Quote:

> I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for sure what
> type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine? Or are
> stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

> Thanks!
> Love,
> EF

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Dan Parke » Sat, 08 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>I use leaves from our Thompson seedless grape vine. Pick them in
>the spring, when they've reached full size.  I freeze them in
>large containers and then boil them for a couple minutes before
>stuffing.  They're very tender, much better than the bottled,
>brined ones!

>Susan Harvey

Yes, this makes sense as Thompson Seedless is a vinifera...the species of
which all (important) European grape varieties are a member.  I've got a TS
out back myself (along with 47 other vines) and may try this myself...my
kids love Dolmas :-)

Dan

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by eo.. » Sat, 08 May 1999 04:00:00



   >>I'm glad you asked that. As I understand it, the leaves of any
   >>grapevine that produces edible grapes are edible and may be used
   >>for dolma, grape leaf salad, etc.
Speaking of grapes, my landlady gave me a couple cuttings and I'm wondering
what to do with them.  They're already rooted.  I live in Zone 3/4 and last
frost date is May 16th.  Is it too soon to put them out?  Other people here
have grown grapes, so I know it can be done.

Sarah in BC

Net-Tamer V 1.11.1 - Test Drive

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Wayne C. Leak » Sun, 09 May 1999 04:00:00


 I'd say put them in the ground.
 Remember, most grapes grown in your area are pretty hardy to begin with.
 You need to get them growing as much as possible this year.

--
 Wayne AKA Blackie!

Quote:


>    >>I'm glad you asked that. As I understand it, the leaves of any
>    >>grapevine that produces edible grapes are edible and may be used
>    >>for dolma, grape leaf salad, etc.
> Speaking of grapes, my landlady gave me a couple cuttings and I'm
wondering
> what to do with them.  They're already rooted.  I live in Zone 3/4 and
last
> frost date is May 16th.  Is it too soon to put them out?  Other people
here
> have grown grapes, so I know it can be done.

> Sarah in BC

> Net-Tamer V 1.11.1 - Test Drive

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grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Infomau » Mon, 10 May 1999 04:00:00


Cooked grape leaves are part of Greek Cuisine.
Some cultures use grapes for medicinal too.
Good Luck, Chris
Infomaui,Inc.



Quote:
> I just bought a house with 20 year old grape vines. (I don't know for
sure what
> type of grapes they are). Is it ok to eat the leaves from any grape vine?
Or are
> stuffed grape leaves made from a specific grape plant.

> Thanks!
> Love,
> EF

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by J;> » Mon, 10 May 1999 04:00:00


|Cooked grape leaves are part of Greek Cuisine.
|
Dolma (not sure of spell) uses grape leaves or cabbage. Delicious.
S

 
 
 

grape leaves: ok to eat?

Post by Helen Ka » Tue, 11 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> On the other hand, there is a special variety of grapevine grown just for
> the leaves. A friend of mine has one of these. Some Palestinian friends
> gave her a couple of stem cuttings, she stuck them the ground, and now she
> has vines all over her back fence. This plant blooms like normal grapes,
> but doesn't produce fruit, just leaves that are unusually tender and
> tangy. It also seems to be highly resistant to iron-deficiency chlorosis,
> which is extremely common in grapevines in our area.

The non-fruiting ornamental grapevine which is sold as "glory vine"--so
called because its leaves change to a brilliant red and hold for longer
than fruiting vines--is good for dolmas: the leaves are larger than those
of most of the fruiting vines and don't have the big indentations. It
makes it so much easier to roll the dolmas without the rice spilling out.

Helen.