Need info on pickle canning/planting

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Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by Jennifer Longsta » Wed, 21 Apr 1993 09:10:46



Hi gang -

First, if this question is inappropriate for this group,
please let me know where I should post it (to the cooking groups?)

I am preparing to plant my 1993 garden.  Every year I put in
cucumbers in preparation for big-time pickle canning in the fall.
(I have about 6 recipes for dills and sweets that I like.)  The
pickles turn out great, except they're not CRUNCHY enough.  They
end up sort of soft, but not mushy.  

I want suggestions on how to get crunchy pickles.  Should I plant
a specific type of cucumber (there are always about 10 kinds of
seeds to pick from, I grab one of the kinds that says "pickling
variety."), or do I need to do something special when I actually
do the canning?  Or maybe I need to pick them sooner?

Any pickle canners out there who have the answer to my dilemma?

Thanks,
Jennifer

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by James Whi » Wed, 21 Apr 1993 23:14:32


allum  (use lots)

I have a crock pickle receipe that usually turns out nice and crunchy.  But alas,
my dills are soft.

--

James White

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by Michael Bru » Thu, 22 Apr 1993 07:51:07


After picking the cukes give them an ice-water bath before canning them.  I put them
in a bowl of water in the fridge for about a day.  I've made the same recipie with
cukes off the same vine both ways - without the water bath they are mushy but with
the water bath they are nice and crisp.

I don't understand why it works but it does, so I don't complain!  :-)

-Mike

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by kl.. » Thu, 22 Apr 1993 09:17:04


Quote:

> I am preparing to plant my 1993 garden.  Every year I put in
> cucumbers in preparation for big-time pickle canning in the fall.
> (I have about 6 recipes for dills and sweets that I like.)  The
> pickles turn out great, except they're not CRUNCHY enough.  They
> end up sort of soft, but not mushy.  

My great aunt always made dill pickles that won all sorts of prizes
at fairs, and swore her secret was to use small cukes, not more than
5" long.  Anything bigger than that went into the pile for bread-and-
butter pickles.

You might also consider trying refrigerator pickle recipes.  Since the
pickles are not processed, they aren't cooked, and are therefore
crunchier.

Kay Klier

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by Bob Klebb » Thu, 22 Apr 1993 02:21:38



Quote:

>I want suggestions on how to get crunchy pickles.  Should I plant
>a specific type of cucumber (there are always about 10 kinds of
>seeds to pick from, I grab one of the kinds that says "pickling
>variety."), or do I need to do something special when I actually
>do the canning?  Or maybe I need to pick them sooner?

I've never previously attempted pickling cucumbers, but I have pickled
peppers for the past 5 years.   Last year I finally was able to maintain
some of the crunch in the peppers for the first time.  The secret is not
to process the peppers/cukes too long.  I always process them in a pint
jar.  Quart jars take too long to heat up.  I also use a pressure canner
which makes the timing more exact.  I go for 10 minutes at 5 pounds.  As
soon as the 10 minutes are up, I take the canner off the range and cool
it down under cold water.  I then open it up and get the jars out so that
they can cool down as quickly as possible.

Another trick might be not to soak the peppers/cucumbers in the brine too
long.  I do think that the colder the brine, the better, but I haven't
done any experiments with that variable.

My recipe may not be the right way to do it, but I figure not much is
going to survive in the cider vinegar.  If I die of botulism, I'll let
you know.

Bob Klebba
Madison, Wisconsin, USDA zone 4

"Feed the soil, not the plant"

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by thac.. » Thu, 22 Apr 1993 17:56:26


Quote:

> Hi gang -

> First, if this question is inappropriate for this group,
> please let me know where I should post it (to the cooking groups?)

> I am preparing to plant my 1993 garden.  Every year I put in
> cucumbers in preparation for big-time pickle canning in the fall.
> (I have about 6 recipes for dills and sweets that I like.)  The
> pickles turn out great, except they're not CRUNCHY enough.  They
> end up sort of soft, but not mushy.  

> Any pickle canners out there who have the answer to my dilemma?

Yes.  The flower end of the pickle produces an enzyme that makes the
pickle go soft in storage.  You should cut off about
1/8 to 1/4 inch of the flower end of the pickle before you start
pickling.  Assuming your salt and vinegar amounts are correct, removing
this slice from the flowering end should make a world of difference.

Don

 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by Bruce A. Mo » Thu, 22 Apr 1993 20:47:22


Sounds like a question for another group, but  here a couple of theoughts.
Make sure that you pick young, firm cukes, not older more developed ones.
You also can add a chemical to give them more firmness (calcium
phosphate?). Check your canning book on that. (Although finding the
chemical at the local grocery may be a problem).
Bruce Moon
Rio Linda, CA
 
 
 

Need info on pickle canning/planting

Post by William E Donalds » Thu, 29 Apr 1993 00:33:08



: >I want suggestions on how to get crunchy pickles.  Should I plan: >a specific type of cucumber (there are always about 10 kinds of

: I've never previously attempted pickling cucumbers, but I have pickled
 (stuff deleted)


One no no---NEVER USE IODIZED SALT in pickling.  It does worse than make
them mushy, it makes them gelatinous.

One way to get crunchy pickles is to soak the cucumbers in pickling lime.
The lime can be obtained in most grocery stores.  Just follow the directions
on the package.  Happy pickling.
                                            Bill