My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Description of your first forum.

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by madgardene » Mon, 06 Feb 2006 14:05:52



I've had my first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome.  I say this because
originally the disease was brought to my attention one early spring or late
winter (as you prefer to think.....hmmmmm, does that mean an optimistic
gardener thinks of the current season as early spring and a pessimistic
gardener thinks of the current season as late winter??  <gbseg>) I tend to
forget when.........but it was pointed out to me by one of our esteemed
Garden newsgroup residents, John Skeffington, that my going thru nurseries
encouraged "sticky pot" syndrome.

I've had my first case of it already.  Wandering around outside and seeing
the new growth poking thru the cold soil despite the weather around them
above, I was struck by the thought that I've never visited the nursery I
just recently discovered during the slower, winter hours.  So I snapped the
dawgs up and we climbed into the brown Chrysler I named "Francis" for the
Aunt who it originally belonged to.  Which is ironic and fitting somehow
because she was my favorite aunt who grew her vegetables and fruit's on
trees and such and was quite the character.  (no tangent!)

Out the driveway,I slow down to take in the winter's colors and textures.  I
never just head out. I take notice of how things are around me.  It seems to
make me appreciate the simpler things.  The car was comfy, and it felt good
to be back in her after the long bout of ignoring her parked underneath the
apple trees that produce inedible fruits that I want so desperately to cut
down, but I love the blossoms sooooo much!  I think that this spring will be
their last one.

I sat atop the ridge, gazing southwards, watching the clouds dancing along
the dark trees like gray waifs searching thru the branches for what, only
they knew.  Heading eastwards.  The dawgs sat patiently as I sat there,
gazing from atop the ridge.  The pastures were various shades of tans and
beiges, with hazes of reddish from spent switch grass and other
unidentifiable grasses.   Time had slowed down for a brief moment.  The
window was down enough to let in the intoxicating smells of damp earth and
molding leaves and grasses. A slight wonderful whiff of cow manure
composting teased my nostrils..... The sounds of the birds calling back and
forth, catching up on the local avarian gossip.  It was still and quiet
enough that I could hear the rushing sounds of the cars thru the trees on
the interstate a couple of miles behind me as they greasily slid thru the
branches and twigs and reached my ears.

Snapping out of my revere, I spoke to Smagol, who had slipped into the
front seat next to me. "Let's go!" and I slid into drive and we were off for
the day.  Music was decent, the day wasn't too drab, and I had a couple of
errands to run first, with some of my own mixed into the whole.  As I shot
thru the stop sign that lies at the bottom of the dead end at the corner of
my neighbor's yard (he's the one who cut back the ancient Forsythia's), I
went up the steep curving road that cuts thru more woods and opens up top of
yet another ridge and hilltop.  I had things to return and had mapped out my
route to where I'd wind up going into town from the first stop.

Once I took care of the returns, my day was my own.  I desperately needed
this.  I looked at Sugar who had now replaced the boy, and told her "we're
up to no good now!" and headed from the east end of Knoxville around the
interstate towards a little seed and nursery provider at the edge of town as
you enter the outskirts of town.  I was on a mission.

Once I got to Knox Seed,  I parked in front of the bricko block building
that's been there for decades, and looked in the rear view mirror to see
what was in the greenhouse behind me on the rise.  Bright, colorful
ornamental Kale in gallon pots was all I saw.  Nice specimen's though they
were, I had business inside.  Crack the window's and tell the dawgs to
"watch my car"  I got out and pushed the easily opened swing door open and
the smells greeting me was like coming home.  Old linoleum that is waxed and
buffed and worn down from thousands of feet, but not thru to the concrete
floor underneath.

The earthy smells of an old-fashioned hardware store was what greeted me as
I pushed the free swinging door to enter.  In the past, there was an ancient
angel wings begonia who was residing in a great 25 gallon pot.  Her knobby,
arthritic branches tipped with a few huge "wings" spotted on green and
backed by burgundy.  The plant was from a cutting done decades ago and was
well over six foot even in the pot.  I didn't see it at the moment, and
hoped it was somewhere else.........

 I went to the aisle where I knew the brass shut off valve was located and
snapped up two of them.  Next to the small cardboard box, I located the
smaller aluminum rose heads to***onto a wand, and began looking on the
shelves and found three kinds of wands.  A shepherds hooked one, for
watering baskets of plants above you, I passed but thought it a great idea.
I liked watering the baskets of plants and getting wet. It's all part of the
magic and enjoyment I find doing the basic things.  Long, slightly curved
ones, and what I was really looking for, a shorty.  ***y plastic coated
handle of a 16" Dramm watering wand.  Just the right length for me as I drag
my extensive hoses throughout the dog-run and pathways.

As I lay the items of my intention down on the high counter, I connected
with a little white haired lady who was busy wrecking havoc on an old adding
machine.  We smiled and I nodded towards the garden basket aisle and told
her I was searching for longer basket hook wires.  Once found, I made mental
note to bring the shorter ones back later in exchange for the nicer lengthy
ones that I needed worse.

In front of the high counter beside the door were cardboard display boxes of
colorful tulips, a few narcissus and some hyacinths.  All these were loose
in the box, with individual prices and pads of identifiable information sent
stapled inside each box for the customer to pull off to remind them what
they were buying.  I broke down and asked for a paper towel to handle the
hyacinth bulb with, remembering the incident with the itching. And as I
laughed, the older lady behind the tall front desks informed me that another
customer had had a more serious encounter with those hyacinths a couple of
weeks back. Had swelled up "something fierce, turned red, started gasping
for breath and had to be taken to the hospital and given Benadril".  I told
her it might be something dusted on the bulbs, and that I only itched. No
worries with me on that one.

She passed me a brown paper towel to pick the yellow hyacinth bulb out of
the box with, and she bagged it separately for me.  I also picked out six of
the fattest Kaufmannia tulip bulbs I could that were just straining to be
planted soon, soon, soon!!  You could almost hear the dry pleadings from the
bins as the bulbs were desperately wanting to just touch their bases into
the damp, cold soil and send down late roots.  I felt badly for them, but
not crazy enough to get more than I could plant. And tulips for me are
special. I don't get just ordinary ones. I get ones that I know will return,
or at least wow me when they bloom their first year.

Pay the woman, and load up, the dogs were waiting for me in anticipation,
and we pulled out of the parking lot and up to the main road (this seed and
nursery sits in a hollow just off a main highway and if you don't know where
it lies, you'll drive right past it as it sits several feet below the road).
Onwards and outwards to other deeds and endeavors.  he he he he............

I knew exactly where I was going.  I wanted to visit Stanley's Greenhouses
and Nurseries.  With all the wonderful
tropical/cacti/succulent/orchid/ornamental tree and shrub capabilities they
have, including an impressive collection of clay pots and urns and planters
and what not, I wanted to just visit while it was the off season and see
what was to be had or not.  I knew I was in trouble when I drove up to the
main low building and saw the huge wreath stuffed with sphagnum mosses and
planted with sedums and pansies that were cranking out textures and colors
in the drab day hung on the outside wall of the perennial alcove.  The
perennial alcove is open, and has a frosted greenhouse roof, with walls that
rise about four foot.   Support posts with hooks that hold great pots of
wonderful seasonal plantings on chains dangle from every post.  Two double
doors can be unlocked so that carts of plants and what-not can be brought
inside, and the tables were mostly bare as I peered just past the plantings
along the outer portion of the room.

I once again told the dogs to watch my car, and I lowered the windows enough
to give them a nice breeze, but not enough to allow Sugar to misbehave when
she spotted the nursery dog who wandered around freely.  I knew she'd
eventually show her rear end and didn't want her able to get out and act
out.

The air was damp and cool, but warmer than you'd have expected it on an
ending January day, and I walked thru the sliding doors and greeted the
ladies who were busy unboxing new shipments of things for the gardens.  The
owner's wife smiled a huge smile for me and I told her I was in serious
garden mode, and got a two tiered cart they have just for their greenhouse
and nursery, and proceeded to inspect the cacti and succulent table.  Huge
euphorbia's, cactus, hawortia's, some pencil cactus that were gigantic and
whose crusted old pots had a sign in them saying "NOT for sale!!".  there
were several of these specimens, I was greatly impressed, and looked for the
odd, tough old geezer of a succulent and changed my mind about the time I
glanced into the perennial room.

Mr. Stanley was watering half heartedly (I wanted to tell him I'd do this
willingly if he'd just hire me! <g>) and I exchanged ...

read more »

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Lady Blackswor » Mon, 06 Feb 2006 14:20:22


Thanks Maddie....Stayed up a bit longer than I wanted to, but it was, as
always, worth it.
Murri


Quote:
> I've had my first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome.  I say this because
> originally the disease was brought to my attention one early spring or
> late
> winter (as you prefer to think.....hmmmmm, does that mean an optimistic
> gardener thinks of the current season as early spring and a pessimistic
> gardener thinks of the current season as late winter??  <gbseg>) I tend to
> forget when.........but it was pointed out to me by one of our esteemed
> garden newsgroup residents, John Skeffington, that my going thru nurseries
> encouraged "sticky pot" syndrome.

> I've had my first case of it already.  Wandering around outside and seeing
> the new growth poking thru the cold soil despite the weather around them
> above, I was struck by the thought that I've never visited the nursery I
> just recently discovered during the slower, winter hours.  So I snapped
> the
> dawgs up and we climbed into the brown Chrysler I named "Francis" for the
> Aunt who it originally belonged to.  Which is ironic and fitting somehow
> because she was my favorite aunt who grew her vegetables and fruit's on
> trees and such and was quite the character.  (no tangent!)

> Out the driveway,I slow down to take in the winter's colors and textures.
> I
> never just head out. I take notice of how things are around me.  It seems
> to
> make me appreciate the simpler things.  The car was comfy, and it felt
> good
> to be back in her after the long bout of ignoring her parked underneath
> the apple trees that produce inedible fruits that I want so desperately to
> cut down, but I love the blossoms sooooo much!  I think that this spring
> will be their last one.

> I sat atop the ridge, gazing southwards, watching the clouds dancing along
> the dark trees like gray waifs searching thru the branches for what, only
> they knew.  Heading eastwards.  The dawgs sat patiently as I sat there,
> gazing from atop the ridge.  The pastures were various shades of tans and
> beiges, with hazes of reddish from spent switch grass and other
> unidentifiable grasses.   Time had slowed down for a brief moment.  The
> window was down enough to let in the intoxicating smells of damp earth and
> molding leaves and grasses. A slight wonderful whiff of cow manure
> composting teased my nostrils..... The sounds of the birds calling back
> and forth, catching up on the local avarian gossip.  It was still and
> quiet enough that I could hear the rushing sounds of the cars thru the
> trees on the interstate a couple of miles behind me as they greasily slid
> thru the branches and twigs and reached my ears.

> Snapping out of my revere, I spoke to Smagol, who had slipped into the
> front seat next to me. "Let's go!" and I slid into drive and we were off
> for the day.  Music was decent, the day wasn't too drab, and I had a
> couple of errands to run first, with some of my own mixed into the whole.
> As I shot thru the stop sign that lies at the bottom of the dead end at
> the corner of my neighbor's yard (he's the one who cut back the ancient
> Forsythia's), I went up the steep curving road that cuts thru more woods
> and opens up top of yet another ridge and hilltop.  I had things to return
> and had mapped out my route to where I'd wind up going into town from the
> first stop.

> Once I took care of the returns, my day was my own.  I desperately needed
> this.  I looked at Sugar who had now replaced the boy, and told her "we're
> up to no good now!" and headed from the east end of Knoxville around the
> interstate towards a little seed and nursery provider at the edge of town
> as you enter the outskirts of town.  I was on a mission.

> Once I got to Knox Seed,  I parked in front of the bricko block building
> that's been there for decades, and looked in the rear view mirror to see
> what was in the greenhouse behind me on the rise.  Bright, colorful
> ornamental Kale in gallon pots was all I saw.  Nice specimen's though they
> were, I had business inside.  Crack the window's and tell the dawgs to
> "watch my car"  I got out and pushed the easily opened swing door open and
> the smells greeting me was like coming home.  Old linoleum that is waxed
> and buffed and worn down from thousands of feet, but not thru to the
> concrete floor underneath.

> The earthy smells of an old-fashioned hardware store was what greeted me
> as I pushed the free swinging door to enter.  In the past, there was an
> ancient angel wings begonia who was residing in a great 25 gallon pot.
> Her knobby, arthritic branches tipped with a few huge "wings" spotted on
> green and backed by burgundy.  The plant was from a cutting done decades
> ago and was well over six foot even in the pot.  I didn't see it at the
> moment, and hoped it was somewhere else.........

> I went to the aisle where I knew the brass shut off valve was located and
> snapped up two of them.  Next to the small cardboard box, I located the
> smaller aluminum rose heads to***onto a wand, and began looking on the
> shelves and found three kinds of wands.  A shepherds hooked one, for
> watering baskets of plants above you, I passed but thought it a great
> idea. I liked watering the baskets of plants and getting wet. It's all
> part of the magic and enjoyment I find doing the basic things.  Long,
> slightly curved ones, and what I was really looking for, a shorty.
> ***y plastic coated handle of a 16" Dramm watering wand.  Just the
> right length for me as I drag my extensive hoses throughout the dog-run
> and pathways.

> As I lay the items of my intention down on the high counter, I connected
> with a little white haired lady who was busy wrecking havoc on an old
> adding machine.  We smiled and I nodded towards the garden basket aisle
> and told her I was searching for longer basket hook wires.  Once found, I
> made mental note to bring the shorter ones back later in exchange for the
> nicer lengthy ones that I needed worse.

> In front of the high counter beside the door were cardboard display boxes
> of colorful tulips, a few narcissus and some hyacinths.  All these were
> loose in the box, with individual prices and pads of identifiable
> information sent stapled inside each box for the customer to pull off to
> remind them what they were buying.  I broke down and asked for a paper
> towel to handle the hyacinth bulb with, remembering the incident with the
> itching. And as I laughed, the older lady behind the tall front desks
> informed me that another customer had had a more serious encounter with
> those hyacinths a couple of weeks back. Had swelled up "something fierce,
> turned red, started gasping for breath and had to be taken to the hospital
> and given Benadril".  I told her it might be something dusted on the
> bulbs, and that I only itched. No worries with me on that one.

> She passed me a brown paper towel to pick the yellow hyacinth bulb out of
> the box with, and she bagged it separately for me.  I also picked out six
> of the fattest Kaufmannia tulip bulbs I could that were just straining to
> be planted soon, soon, soon!!  You could almost hear the dry pleadings
> from the bins as the bulbs were desperately wanting to just touch their
> bases into the damp, cold soil and send down late roots.  I felt badly for
> them, but not crazy enough to get more than I could plant. And tulips for
> me are special. I don't get just ordinary ones. I get ones that I know
> will return, or at least wow me when they bloom their first year.

> Pay the woman, and load up, the dogs were waiting for me in anticipation,
> and we pulled out of the parking lot and up to the main road (this seed
> and nursery sits in a hollow just off a main highway and if you don't know
> where it lies, you'll drive right past it as it sits several feet below
> the road). Onwards and outwards to other deeds and endeavors.  he he he
> he............

> I knew exactly where I was going.  I wanted to visit Stanley's Greenhouses
> and Nurseries.  With all the wonderful
> tropical/cacti/succulent/orchid/ornamental tree and shrub capabilities
> they have, including an impressive collection of clay pots and urns and
> planters and what not, I wanted to just visit while it was the off season
> and see what was to be had or not.  I knew I was in trouble when I drove
> up to the main low building and saw the huge wreath stuffed with sphagnum
> mosses and planted with sedums and pansies that were cranking out textures
> and colors in the drab day hung on the outside wall of the perennial
> alcove.  The perennial alcove is open, and has a frosted greenhouse roof,
> with walls that rise about four foot.   Support posts with hooks that hold
> great pots of wonderful seasonal plantings on chains dangle from every
> post.  Two double doors can be unlocked so that carts of plants and
> what-not can be brought inside, and the tables were mostly bare as I
> peered just past the plantings along the outer portion of the room.

> I once again told the dogs to watch my car, and I lowered the windows
> enough to give them a nice breeze, but not enough to allow Sugar to
> misbehave when she spotted the nursery dog who wandered around freely.  I
> knew she'd eventually show her rear end and didn't want her able to get
> out and act out.

> The air was damp and cool, but warmer than you'd have expected it on an
> ending January day, and I walked thru the sliding doors and greeted the
> ladies who were busy unboxing new shipments of things for the gardens.
> The owner's wife smiled a huge smile for me and I told her I was in
> serious garden mode, and got a two tiered cart they have just for their
> greenhouse and nursery, and proceeded to inspect the cacti and

...

read more »

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by madgardene » Mon, 06 Feb 2006 14:28:45



Quote:
> Thanks Maddie....Stayed up a bit longer than I wanted to, but it was, as
> always, worth it.
> Murri

thanks Murri!!  ((hug))
maddie
 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by loonyhike » Mon, 06 Feb 2006 21:12:49


This was great Maddie! I couldn't sleep last night and woke up feeling
extremely anxious (must be hormones) but after reading this it helped calm
me down. Maybe I'll get outside today but it is 25 so it better warm up
first.


Quote:
> I've had my first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome.  I say this because
> originally the disease was brought to my attention one early spring or
> late
> winter (as you prefer to think.....hmmmmm, does that mean an optimistic
> gardener thinks of the current season as early spring and a pessimistic
> gardener thinks of the current season as late winter??  <gbseg>) I tend to
> forget when.........but it was pointed out to me by one of our esteemed
> garden newsgroup residents, John Skeffington, that my going thru nurseries
> encouraged "sticky pot" syndrome.

> I've had my first case of it already.  Wandering around outside and seeing
> the new growth poking thru the cold soil despite the weather around them
> above, I was struck by the thought that I've never visited the nursery I
> just recently discovered during the slower, winter hours.  So I snapped
> the
> dawgs up and we climbed into the brown Chrysler I named "Francis" for the
> Aunt who it originally belonged to.  Which is ironic and fitting somehow
> because she was my favorite aunt who grew her vegetables and fruit's on
> trees and such and was quite the character.  (no tangent!)

> Out the driveway,I slow down to take in the winter's colors and textures.
> I
> never just head out. I take notice of how things are around me.  It seems
> to
> make me appreciate the simpler things.  The car was comfy, and it felt
> good
> to be back in her after the long bout of ignoring her parked underneath
> the apple trees that produce inedible fruits that I want so desperately to
> cut down, but I love the blossoms sooooo much!  I think that this spring
> will be their last one.

> I sat atop the ridge, gazing southwards, watching the clouds dancing along
> the dark trees like gray waifs searching thru the branches for what, only
> they knew.  Heading eastwards.  The dawgs sat patiently as I sat there,
> gazing from atop the ridge.  The pastures were various shades of tans and
> beiges, with hazes of reddish from spent switch grass and other
> unidentifiable grasses.   Time had slowed down for a brief moment.  The
> window was down enough to let in the intoxicating smells of damp earth and
> molding leaves and grasses. A slight wonderful whiff of cow manure
> composting teased my nostrils..... The sounds of the birds calling back
> and forth, catching up on the local avarian gossip.  It was still and
> quiet enough that I could hear the rushing sounds of the cars thru the
> trees on the interstate a couple of miles behind me as they greasily slid
> thru the branches and twigs and reached my ears.

> Snapping out of my revere, I spoke to Smagol, who had slipped into the
> front seat next to me. "Let's go!" and I slid into drive and we were off
> for the day.  Music was decent, the day wasn't too drab, and I had a
> couple of errands to run first, with some of my own mixed into the whole.
> As I shot thru the stop sign that lies at the bottom of the dead end at
> the corner of my neighbor's yard (he's the one who cut back the ancient
> Forsythia's), I went up the steep curving road that cuts thru more woods
> and opens up top of yet another ridge and hilltop.  I had things to return
> and had mapped out my route to where I'd wind up going into town from the
> first stop.

> Once I took care of the returns, my day was my own.  I desperately needed
> this.  I looked at Sugar who had now replaced the boy, and told her "we're
> up to no good now!" and headed from the east end of Knoxville around the
> interstate towards a little seed and nursery provider at the edge of town
> as you enter the outskirts of town.  I was on a mission.

> Once I got to Knox Seed,  I parked in front of the bricko block building
> that's been there for decades, and looked in the rear view mirror to see
> what was in the greenhouse behind me on the rise.  Bright, colorful
> ornamental Kale in gallon pots was all I saw.  Nice specimen's though they
> were, I had business inside.  Crack the window's and tell the dawgs to
> "watch my car"  I got out and pushed the easily opened swing door open and
> the smells greeting me was like coming home.  Old linoleum that is waxed
> and buffed and worn down from thousands of feet, but not thru to the
> concrete floor underneath.

> The earthy smells of an old-fashioned hardware store was what greeted me
> as I pushed the free swinging door to enter.  In the past, there was an
> ancient angel wings begonia who was residing in a great 25 gallon pot.
> Her knobby, arthritic branches tipped with a few huge "wings" spotted on
> green and backed by burgundy.  The plant was from a cutting done decades
> ago and was well over six foot even in the pot.  I didn't see it at the
> moment, and hoped it was somewhere else.........

> I went to the aisle where I knew the brass shut off valve was located and
> snapped up two of them.  Next to the small cardboard box, I located the
> smaller aluminum rose heads to***onto a wand, and began looking on the
> shelves and found three kinds of wands.  A shepherds hooked one, for
> watering baskets of plants above you, I passed but thought it a great
> idea. I liked watering the baskets of plants and getting wet. It's all
> part of the magic and enjoyment I find doing the basic things.  Long,
> slightly curved ones, and what I was really looking for, a shorty.
> ***y plastic coated handle of a 16" Dramm watering wand.  Just the
> right length for me as I drag my extensive hoses throughout the dog-run
> and pathways.

> As I lay the items of my intention down on the high counter, I connected
> with a little white haired lady who was busy wrecking havoc on an old
> adding machine.  We smiled and I nodded towards the garden basket aisle
> and told her I was searching for longer basket hook wires.  Once found, I
> made mental note to bring the shorter ones back later in exchange for the
> nicer lengthy ones that I needed worse.

> In front of the high counter beside the door were cardboard display boxes
> of colorful tulips, a few narcissus and some hyacinths.  All these were
> loose in the box, with individual prices and pads of identifiable
> information sent stapled inside each box for the customer to pull off to
> remind them what they were buying.  I broke down and asked for a paper
> towel to handle the hyacinth bulb with, remembering the incident with the
> itching. And as I laughed, the older lady behind the tall front desks
> informed me that another customer had had a more serious encounter with
> those hyacinths a couple of weeks back. Had swelled up "something fierce,
> turned red, started gasping for breath and had to be taken to the hospital
> and given Benadril".  I told her it might be something dusted on the
> bulbs, and that I only itched. No worries with me on that one.

> She passed me a brown paper towel to pick the yellow hyacinth bulb out of
> the box with, and she bagged it separately for me.  I also picked out six
> of the fattest Kaufmannia tulip bulbs I could that were just straining to
> be planted soon, soon, soon!!  You could almost hear the dry pleadings
> from the bins as the bulbs were desperately wanting to just touch their
> bases into the damp, cold soil and send down late roots.  I felt badly for
> them, but not crazy enough to get more than I could plant. And tulips for
> me are special. I don't get just ordinary ones. I get ones that I know
> will return, or at least wow me when they bloom their first year.

> Pay the woman, and load up, the dogs were waiting for me in anticipation,
> and we pulled out of the parking lot and up to the main road (this seed
> and nursery sits in a hollow just off a main highway and if you don't know
> where it lies, you'll drive right past it as it sits several feet below
> the road). Onwards and outwards to other deeds and endeavors.  he he he
> he............

> I knew exactly where I was going.  I wanted to visit Stanley's Greenhouses
> and Nurseries.  With all the wonderful
> tropical/cacti/succulent/orchid/ornamental tree and shrub capabilities
> they have, including an impressive collection of clay pots and urns and
> planters and what not, I wanted to just visit while it was the off season
> and see what was to be had or not.  I knew I was in trouble when I drove
> up to the main low building and saw the huge wreath stuffed with sphagnum
> mosses and planted with sedums and pansies that were cranking out textures
> and colors in the drab day hung on the outside wall of the perennial
> alcove.  The perennial alcove is open, and has a frosted greenhouse roof,
> with walls that rise about four foot.   Support posts with hooks that hold
> great pots of wonderful seasonal plantings on chains dangle from every
> post.  Two double doors can be unlocked so that carts of plants and
> what-not can be brought inside, and the tables were mostly bare as I
> peered just past the plantings along the outer portion of the room.

> I once again told the dogs to watch my car, and I lowered the windows
> enough to give them a nice breeze, but not enough to allow Sugar to
> misbehave when she spotted the nursery dog who wandered around freely.  I
> knew she'd eventually show her rear end and didn't want her able to get
> out and act out.

> The air was damp and cool, but warmer than you'd have expected it on an
> ending January day, and I walked thru the sliding doors and greeted the
> ladies who were busy unboxing new shipments of things for the gardens.
> The owner's wife smiled a huge smile for me and I told her I was in
> serious garden

...

read more »

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by madgardene » Tue, 07 Feb 2006 01:55:32



Quote:
> This was great Maddie! I couldn't sleep last night and woke up feeling
> extremely anxious (must be hormones) but after reading this it helped calm
> me down. Maybe I'll get outside today but it is 25 so it better warm up
> first.

it went down to the low 20's here too. And we had about an inch of snow
dusting everything.  Now it's melting, but they're calling for bouts of snow
and sporatic lows all week. 40's and 20's............sounds like
February...........<gbseg>  hormones, eh?  been there, done that.....rode
the ride, bought the tee shirt and returned it, but apparently the power
surge clause is permanent LOL
maddie
 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Kay » Tue, 07 Feb 2006 04:37:38



Quote:
>Thanks Maddie....Stayed up a bit longer than I wanted to, but it was, as
>always, worth it.

But please could you snip and not repost the whole thing?
--
Kay
 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Kay » Tue, 07 Feb 2006 04:39:36



Quote:
>This was great Maddie! I couldn't sleep last night and woke up feeling
>extremely anxious (must be hormones) but after reading this it helped
>calm me down. Maybe I'll get outside today but it is 25 so it better
>warm up first.

Please could you snip and not repost the whole thing again? Different
peopl read urg in different ways - I use the space bar to space down
because it's less of a problem to my RSI, and I'd rather not have to
space down through the same article multiple times.
--
Kay
 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by sockiesca » Tue, 07 Feb 2006 09:38:06



This was great Maddie! I couldn't sleep last night and woke up feeling
extremely anxious (must be hormones) but after reading this it helped
calm me down. Maybe I'll get outside today but it is 25 so it better
warm up first.

Please could you snip and not repost the whole thing again? Different
peopl read urg in different ways - I use the space bar to space down
because it's less of a problem to my RSI, and I'd rather not have to
space down through the same article multiple times.
--
Kay

thanks maddie we have just finished supper and thought i would peek in.
really enjoyed your story as usual :).           cyaaaa, sockiescat.

--
sockiescat

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by madgardene » Tue, 07 Feb 2006 15:53:39



Quote:


> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>whack prune JUST for Kay>>>>>>>>
> thanks maddie we have just finished supper and thought i would peek in.
> really enjoyed your story as usual :).           cyaaaa, sockiescat.

> --
> sockiescat

you're more than welcome...<gbseg>
maddie
 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Glori » Wed, 08 Feb 2006 09:11:34


Delightful, Maddie! I felt like I was with you...
'cept my hands are empty!

Gloria

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Sue Burnha » Wed, 08 Feb 2006 09:29:17


Maddie.. tsk tsk tsk.

In spite of the delightful read ( thank you very much for that!)  YOU should
know you have no antibodies against Sticky Pot Syndrome, and  SHOULD
understand that your immune system just doesn't rise to  the Early Spring
Greenhouse Challenge.

I feel the same innoculation calling my name.  Wish you hadn't mentioned it,
but it is my turn to go see whats available.

<VBG>

Sue
Western Maine

 
 
 

My first bout with "sticky pot" syndrome

Post by Sach » Wed, 08 Feb 2006 19:00:38



Quote:

> Delightful, Maddie! I felt like I was with you...
> 'cept my hands are empty!

I know Maddie's feeling so well.  When I first came to this nursery, I was a
customer.  When I went back to my then house with the third or fourth boot
load of plants, the gardener looked at me and said "I'm really glad this
house hasn't got a flat roof".......  ;-)
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon