Growing Roses from cuttings

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Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by ThomasW3 » Tue, 20 Sep 1994 08:16:01



Does anyone along the 'net have any suggestions, hints, advice, etc. for
growing roses from hardwood cuttings?  Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks.
 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Libby Goldstei » Tue, 20 Sep 1994 02:53:00


You may want to check the Ortho book "All about Roses".

My experience has been that it much the best way to propagate
roses is from flowering stems. Cut the flower back to a 5-leaflet
leaf, and make the cut just above the leaf. Remove the flower.
Plant the cutting in ordinary potting soil. Cover the top of the
pot with a plastic bag trying to avoid contact between the leaves
and the plastic. Put the pot on a pebble tray and put the pebble
tray on a heating cable, propagating mat or cable box on top of
the
TV.

Good Luck

Libby

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Ti » Tue, 20 Sep 1994 22:52:02



Quote:

> Does anyone along the 'net have any suggestions, hints, advice, etc. for
> growing roses from hardwood cuttings?  Any help would be appreciated.
> Thanks.

I'd at least start with rooting hormone and some advice from the local nursery...

I'm curious to see other postings...

_____________________________________________________________________
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Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Farooq Bu » Tue, 20 Sep 1994 23:44:29


Quote:

>You may want to check the Ortho book "All about Roses".

>My experience has been that it much the best way to propagate
>roses is from flowering stems. Cut the flower back to a 5-leaflet
>leaf, and make the cut just above the leaf. Remove the flower.
>Plant the cutting in ordinary potting soil. Cover the top of the
>pot with a plastic bag trying to avoid contact between the leaves
>and the plastic. Put the pot on a pebble tray and put the pebble
>tray on a heating cable, propagating mat or cable box on top of
>the
>TV.

Folks: I have had terrible problems with just using potting soil
as a rooting medium and have just bought a bag o' vermiculite and  
plan to do the next batch in sand and vermiculite.  Any war stories
re: potting medium for rose cuttings ?

fmb

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Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Suzi Armago » Wed, 21 Sep 1994 04:26:11


Quote:


>Subject: Re: Growing Roses from cuttings
>Date: Mon, 19 Sep 1994 09:52:02 -0400



Check the roses bulletin  ...rec.gardens.roses  they posted a very detailed,
"how to" just a week or so ago, I haven't tried it yet, but I intend to.  You
grow them in zip-lock bags.

Suzi

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Michael PAUL Ge » Sat, 24 Sep 1994 11:58:53


        My friend just takes cuttings (green, mostly) and puts them in
water after defoliating them (just take off leaves).  She leaves them in
the water until roots can be seen, and then plants 'em straight into the
ground and watches the watering etc.  This may have a high mortality
rate, but 1 outta 3 is her usual....  Hope this helps...

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Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Kathy McEne » Sat, 24 Sep 1994 22:12:47


Shoot, I made my rose stem cuttings without leaves.  Some of them seem to
still be alive, so maybe there's still hope.  Martha Stewart kept talking
about a powdered root hormone, but I used some liquid root starter I found in
the shed.  Now I am watering with Miracle-Gro.  Am I on the right track here?

Does anyone know how long it should take before your stem cuttings produce new
growth?  Is two weeks too short a time to give up?  Also, why do the
instructions say to put a plastic bag over your pot?

Many thanks.

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Madelin Holtka » Wed, 28 Sep 1994 09:29:25



Quote:

> Shoot, I made my rose stem cuttings without leaves.  Some of them seem to
> still be alive, so maybe there's still hope.  Martha Stewart kept talking
> about a powdered root hormone, but I used some liquid root starter I found in
> the shed.  Now I am watering with Miracle-Gro.  Am I on the right track here?

> Does anyone know how long it should take before your stem cuttings produce new
> growth?  Is two weeks too short a time to give up?  Also, why do the
> instructions say to put a plastic bag over your pot?

> Many thanks.

Yes!  Two weeks is too short a time.  I have some cuttings that I made
which took four months to show growth.  Make sure that the cuttings get
plenty of moisture, but not too much heat.  Good luck!
 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by William All » Thu, 29 Sep 1994 00:24:28


Quote:

>Does anyone along the 'net have any suggestions, hints, advice, etc. for
>growing roses from hardwood cuttings?  Any help would be appreciated.
>Thanks.

I've had good luck in cutting a long (about 1 foot) stem just after a bloom
has faded from the end of the stem.  I remove all the leaves from the
bottom half of the stem.  Then I stick the whole lower six inches into the
spot where I want the plant to grow and keep the area reasonably moist.
Usually new leaves start to develop within two weeks.  This trick was
taught to me by an old lady who could grow brooms by sticking broom sticks
into the earth.  By the way, she preferred to tear the limb from the bush
rather than cutting it.  I think the secret lies somewhere in all those
nodes being beneath ground level where they never dry out.
good luck
william allen

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Karen Baldw » Thu, 29 Sep 1994 23:38:31


Quote:

> Shoot, I made my rose stem cuttings without leaves.  Some of them seem to
> still be alive, so maybe there's still hope.  Martha Stewart kept talking
> about a powdered root hormone, but I used some liquid root starter I found in
> the shed.  Now I am watering with Miracle-Gro.  Am I on the right track here?

> Does anyone know how long it should take before your stem cuttings produce new
> growth?  Is two weeks too short a time to give up?  Also, why do the
> instructions say to put a plastic bag over your pot?

> Many thanks.

NO leaves?  well, maybe you'll get incredibly lucky, presuming you
actually have a couple or three nodes where the leaves normally spring
from.  i wouldn't be exceedingly optimistic, though.  the plant uses
leaves for its primary photosynthesis (using the chemical energy
generated from sunlight, via chlorophyll (the green stuff) to generate
usable plant sugars to feed the plant).  without leaves, you're limiting
the plant's ability to survive.  a small amount of photosynthesis
will occur in the green of the stems/canes, but not anything like the
amount that goes on with the broad surface area provided by leaves.

but, too weeks is too short a time ... depending on the maturity of the
cutting you took, it can take 3-5 weeks before the roots are established,
and top growth might not begin until after that occurs.  and that's under
normal circumstances.  with no leaves, the process will probably take longer,
presuming the plant can hold out long enough without adequate means to
nourish itself initially.  

the plastic bag provides a closed "terrarium" or "hothouse" environment
to keep things more than usually moist and warm ... a environment that
encourages new growth ... kinder for a new cutting to get started in.

                         ROSE PROPAGATION

Almost all of this wisdom came from Cheryl Netter, who has
had almost 100 percent success with this method for
miniatures, old world Garden roses, and english roses.  
I've just rearranged some info and added a few hints.

MAKING THE CUTTING:

*) Preferably take a cutting on which the bloom is spent, so that
   all the petals have just dropped off.  It is okay to take a
   cutting earlier, but at least make sure color is showing in the bud.
   These are indications of the maturity of the wood in the stem --
   you want something in between the extremes of greenwood and hardwood.

*) Have at least four separate leafsets under the bloom, and a five-leaflet
   set at the bottom of the cutting.  (Each spot where the leafsets
   meet the stem forms a "node," from which roots can form.  Hybrid
   teas tend to have fewer "nodes" spaced farther apart than Old World
   roses, and thus require a longer cutting, generally speaking).

*) Keep your cuttings fresh in water while you gather more,
   until you're ready to plant them.

PLANTING THE CUTTING:

*) Fill a 1-gallon zip lock baggie 1/4 to 1/3 full with STERILE
   loose potting mix. (e.g., 1/2 peter's potting soil and 1/2 perlite)
   (A 2-gallon ziplock baggie may be better since it will give the
   leaves more room, but use the same depth of soil you'd use in a
   1-gallon baggie, since you'll be watching for roots growing
   through it, later.)

*) Moisten the mix but do not make it extremely wet.  Use 1 tsp.
   miracle gro per 1 quart of water, to provide some initial
   nutrients (which may help avoid yellowing and leaf-drop).

*) Snip off the stem a little above the top-most leaf set
   (i.e., remove the flowering part).

*) Strip off the bottom two sets of leaves (where the stem
   will be pushed into the soil).

*) Score the bottom part of the stem along its length (vertically)
   for an inch or so. (An exacto-knife works nicely for this
   purpose, but fingernails will do fine.)  Roots will form
   along this score.

*) Dip scored end of cutting into rooting compound, a couple inches
   deep. Knock off the excess (you can get too thick a layer).  
   Stick the cutting a couple of inches into the soil.  

*) Sprinkle a very small amount of diazinon or other insecticide on
   the soil surface (optional -- to avoid chomped-up leaves).

*) Mist the cutting and the interior surfaces of the baggie with
   a spray bottle filled with the following mix (to avoid fungus
   and mildew growth in the closed "terrarium" environment):

      1 quart water
      1 tsp. miracle gro
      1 tsp. baking soda (no more!)
      2-3 drops dishwashing liquid (to make it cling)

*) Zip baggie almost shut.  Breathe into it 'til it expands
   kinda like a balloon, and zip the rest of the way closed.
   (Keep it closed unless it deflates enough to warrant
   breathing into it again.)

*) Put in bright, INDIRECT light -
   (e.g., behind sheers in a southeast-facing window)
   WARNING!!! if it gets direct sun it will scorch and likely die!

POTTING THE CUTTING:

*) Look for roots along the bottom of the baggie in two or three
   weeks (a few real stubborn ones may take six weeks).

*) When you see some top growth, unzip the baggie a little.  
   Unzip a little more every day for about a week, then
   transplant to a pot.

*) Keep the same lighting (protected from too much direct sun)
   for a few days, leaving the cutting unmolested to give its
   disturbed roots a chance to heal.

*) After they have spent a few days in their pots, put them in
   as bright a window as you can. (Open those sheers.)
   (Note:  Gro-lights don't normally put out nearly enough
   light for roses, though it can probably be done.)

PLANTING OUTDOORS:

*) Keep them inside for their first winter, especially in zones
   5 and below.  (When planted outside in the same summer they were
   rooted, even with a heavy mulch, many more will be lost to winter
   kill since the new little roses won't always have enough roots to
   carry them through.   Also, chinooks (intense, warm winds) do
   their damage too. By keeping them inside for their first winter,
   and planting them in the spring, they will be better-established
   by the next fall.)

*) Plant late enough to avoid those *** springs that get warm,
   causing the roses to break dormancy, only to follow up with
   a hard freeze!

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Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by kea.. » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 04:23:12


Quote:

>> Does anyone along the 'net have any suggestions, hints, advice, etc. for
>> growing roses from hardwood cuttings?  Any help would be appreciated.
>> Thanks.

>I just read an article on Old Roses and propagation in the best of Fine

Gardening  -- "Shrubs and Trees".  The old varieties are very hardy and don't
require being grafted to a rootstock.  The author takes cuttings from canes
that are neither old nor new.  They should be from this season's growth, but
not so young that they're tender and weak...  When you find a suitable cane nip
off the first few inches and cut the rest into 3-in pieces, each with three
buds.  Carfully remove the bottom leaf and stick it in a pot.  He writes that
the old varieties often don't need rooting hormone.  His rooting medium is made
of highly decomposed pine bark mixed with perlite and a little sand -- damp but
not wet.

I'm planning to try it this fall. I hope it works for you.
Paul Cauthorn

Quote:

>________________________________________________

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by AURILEE R. DESTRAM » Thu, 06 Oct 1994 01:43:07


: >
: >> Does anyone along the 'net have any suggestions, hints, advice, etc. for
: >> growing roses from hardwood cuttings?  Any help would be appreciated.
: >> Thanks.
: >
: >I just read an article on Old Roses and propagation in the best of Fine
: Gardening  -- "Shrubs and Trees".  The old varieties are very hardy and don't
: require being grafted to a rootstock.  The author takes cuttings from canes
: that are neither old nor new.  They should be from this season's growth, but
: not so young that they're tender and weak...  When you find a suitable cane nip
: off the first few inches and cut the rest into 3-in pieces, each with three
: buds.  Carfully remove the bottom leaf and stick it in a pot.  He writes that
: the old varieties often don't need rooting hormone.  His rooting medium is made
: of highly decomposed pine bark mixed with perlite and a little sand -- damp but
: not wet.

: I'm planning to try it this fall. I hope it works for you.
: Paul Cauthorn

I have successfully (finally) grown a rose from a cutting.  It is now about
5 inches tall growing in a huge pot (I just plunked it in with some other
plants, using rootone, and the darn thing took) and I want to know if I should
plant it in the ground now, or wait until Spring.  I live in Zone 3.                                                
: >________________________________________________

 
 
 

Growing Roses from cuttings

Post by Moira Carls » Thu, 06 Oct 1994 04:05:32



Quote:
DES***E) writes:
>I have successfully (finally) grown a rose from a cutting.  It is now
about
>5 inches tall growing in a huge pot (I just plunked it in with some other
>plants, using rootone, and the darn thing took) and I want to know if I
should
>plant it in the ground now, or wait until Spring.  I live in Zone 3.

This rose is too young and the roots won't be very strong or long yet, so
leave it inside for the winter (somewhere where it gets as much sun as you
can manage) and put it out after all danger of frost is over next spring.
If you put it outside now you will almost surely lose it.

Cheers,
Moira