How to transplant roses

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How to transplant roses

Post by Henc » Wed, 10 Apr 2013 10:04:24



The old owners of my house planted four small rose bushes and we want to
move them.

The bushes are only single stem, mabe two two stem, and about 3 feet
high.  How does somebody move these? How deep are the roots? what to
feed them? and how much sun do they need.

Zone 5a/5b Southern Ontario Canuckistan

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by Higgs Boso » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 04:57:59


Quote:

> The old owners of my house planted four small rose bushes and we want to

> move them.

> The bushes are only single stem, mabe two two stem, and about 3 feet

> high.  How does somebody move these? How deep are the roots? what to

Roses need FULL SUN.  Since you a little further North than I, notice where the sun hits during the day, esp. in winter when it is low in the sky.  Don't plant there if you can help it.

Roses should move OK provided you prepare the future area carefully.  

What is the soil like in their future home?  Is it clay, loam, what?  
Is it on a slope or on level ground?
Does it collect standing water from rain?
Is there anything growing there now that you need to remove?
If so, do the outgoing plants have deep roots you need to dig out?

Re: Feeding, ***DO NOT fertilize immediately upon moving.***  Let them settle in for several months.  You can help them get a start by use a transplant medium, available in any nursery or homeowner store. READ THE LABEL.  Do not overdose. Or see my home-made transplant mix below.

Do not move in the heat of the day.  Very early morning, or evening.

Make a little dam around the drip line (outside extent of leaves)  Water in slowly and  gently.

When I transplant bushes/shrubs/roses, I make a mix of worm castings (great stuff!) home-made (or store) compost, and vermiculite or perlite.  The latter two, as you may know, are volcanic stuff which lightens the soil; makes it less dense; permits oxygen to enter.  READ THE LABELS.

Dig out roses to be moved deep and carefully so as not to cut roots too much.  A little won't hurt. Watering (not too much) in advance might make it easier IF ground is dry.  Take as much root ball with you as possible (unless the soil in new area is radically different).  

Quote:

> Many good Web sites to take you through whole process.  Always note/specify your area.

Bonne chance

HB

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by Bill » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 14:26:07




Quote:

> > The old owners of my house planted four small rose bushes and we want to

> > move them.

> > The bushes are only single stem, mabe two two stem, and about 3 feet

> > high.  How does somebody move these? How deep are the roots? what to

> Roses need FULL SUN.  Since you a little further North than I, notice where
> the sun hits during the day, esp. in winter when it is low in the sky.  Don't
> plant there if you can help it.

> Roses should move OK provided you prepare the future area carefully.  

> What is the soil like in their future home?  Is it clay, loam, what?  
> Is it on a slope or on level ground?
> Does it collect standing water from rain?
> Is there anything growing there now that you need to remove?
> If so, do the outgoing plants have deep roots you need to dig out?

> Re: Feeding, ***DO NOT fertilize immediately upon moving.***  Let them settle
> in for several months.  You can help them get a start by use a transplant
> medium, available in any nursery or homeowner store. READ THE LABEL.  Do not
> overdose. Or see my home-made transplant mix below.

> Do not move in the heat of the day.  Very early morning, or evening.

> Make a little dam around the drip line (outside extent of leaves)  Water in
> slowly and  gently.

> When I transplant bushes/shrubs/roses, I make a mix of worm castings (great
> stuff!) home-made (or store) compost, and vermiculite or perlite.  The latter
> two, as you may know, are volcanic stuff which lightens the soil; makes it
> less dense; permits oxygen to enter.  READ THE LABELS.

> Dig out roses to be moved deep and carefully so as not to cut roots too much.
>  A little won't hurt. Watering (not too much) in advance might make it easier
> IF ground is dry.  Take as much root ball with you as possible (unless the
> soil in new area is radically different).  

> > Many good Web sites to take you through whole process.  Always note/specify
> > your area.

> Bonne chance

> HB

Preferably in winter, but now should be OK. Dig hole, dig up rose with
as much soil as you can. Put rose in new hole, and fill in dirt. Fish
emulsion, and water. Enjoy.

--
Remember Rachel Corrie
<http://www.rachelcorrie.org/>

Welcome to the New America.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg>

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by Higgs Boso » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 11:24:12


Quote:

> The old owners of my house planted four small rose bushes and we want to

> move them.

> The bushes are only single stem, mabe two two stem, and about 3 feet

> high.  How does somebody move these? How deep are the roots? what to

> feed them? and how much sun do they need.

> Zone 5a/5b Southern Ontario Canuckistan

Sorry, I made a terrible mistake in my reply.

I suggested that you not move the roses in the heat of the day; rather early morning or evening.   WRONG!  I was confusing WATERING, which should be done early morning or evening.  Do not water in the heat of the day; the sun can burn through the water drops to the plant leaves.

What I meant is that TRANSPLANTING should ALWAYS be done in the late afternoon or early evening, so the poor plant has a chance to rest overnight before the sun hits.

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by Bill » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 14:13:32




Quote:

> > The old owners of my house planted four small rose bushes and we want to

> > move them.

> > The bushes are only single stem, mabe two two stem, and about 3 feet

> > high.  How does somebody move these? How deep are the roots? what to

> > feed them? and how much sun do they need.

> > Zone 5a/5b Southern Ontario Canuckistan

> Sorry, I made a terrible mistake in my reply.

> I suggested that you not move the roses in the heat of the day; rather early
> morning or evening.   WRONG!  I was confusing WATERING, which should be done
> early morning or evening.  Do not water in the heat of the day; the sun can
> burn through the water drops to the plant leaves.

More misinformation from our IDF representative. Plants will be less
stressed if moved in the cool of the day, but water drops won't act like
little magnifying glasses and burn holes in your leaves, or the plant's.

Quote:

> What I meant is that TRANSPLANTING should ALWAYS be done in the late
> afternoon or early evening, so the poor plant has a chance to rest overnight
> before the sun hits.

--
Remember Rachel Corrie
<http://www.rachelcorrie.org/>

Welcome to the New America.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg>

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by David Hare-Scot » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 15:15:09


 Do not water in the

Quote:
> heat of the day; the sun can burn through the water drops to the
> plant leaves.

Get out, that isn't right.

The reason you don't water in the middle of the day is the Faeries need to
have a shower sometimes and they won't drop their gear in full sun.  If they
do there is a risk that they get sunburned on their tiny ...s due to the
hole in the ozone layer.  If their ...s get sunburned they will glow in the
dark and then you have to rub them with Extra *** olive oil . So be nice
to the Little People and water in the evening, or keep the EVOO nearby and
your hands warm.

D

 
 
 

How to transplant roses

Post by Higgs Boso » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 11:38:46


Quote:


>  Do not water in the

> > heat of the day; the sun can burn through the water drops to the

> > plant leaves.

> Get out, that isn't right.

> The reason you don't water in the middle of the day is the Faeries need to

> have a shower sometimes and they won't drop their gear in full sun.  If they

> do there is a risk that they get sunburned on their tiny ...s due to the

> hole in the ozone layer.  If their ...s get sunburned they will glow in the

> dark and then you have to rub them with Extra *** olive oil . So be nice

> to the Little People and water in the evening, or keep the EVOO nearby and

> your hands warm.

Oh, thank you David!  That makes it perfectly clear, and ever so much more poetically <VBG>

HB

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Quote:

> D