Seeds from bulb plant?

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Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by Higgs Boso » Tue, 06 Mar 2012 17:00:21



A while back I requested ID on this plant:

http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

and response was Tulip.

It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds.   I am
collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
ask:  Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

Inquiring minds...

So Calif Coastal

TIA

HB

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 00:00:40


...

Quote:
> ask:  Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

> Inquiring minds...

  yes, they can, it depends upon the genetics
of the plants, some do well if they are cross-bred
but don't self-fertilize well, others do just
fine with self-pollination.

  the seeds that you can see through that are
like superfine tissue paper with no nub (germ)
visible in the flat part are not going to be
viable.  they blow away quite easily if you
breath on them.

  the seeds that have some bulk to them and the
nub in the middle are the best bet.

  to get them to sprout it is often a requirement
for a cold damp period.  some people use a fridge
with damp peat moss, sand and perlite mix.  must
not dry out or they shrivel up and are gone to
nothing quickly.  after sprouting then put them
in a loose soil mix and keep at least moist.
damping off can be a problem, so the right surface
layer of the soil is important.  some people use
grit for this.

  the sprouts will grow and look like a small
chives or blades of grass the first season (about
six weeks).  below ground the sprout is putting a
root downwards to make a tiny bulb.  end of the
first season the bulb is about the size of grain
of rice and looks like a bulb in miniature.  very
cute!

  each year the bulb will get bigger and in some
species will keep dropping down further to reach
the right place for your climate.  a flower
can show up anywhere from three to seven years
later (varies by species and growing conditions).

  from my rather scattered efforts without a
dedicated place to sprout or keep them i'll probably
get 1 of 300 seeds to ***hood.  someone with more
space, better soil and equipment could probably do
quite well and get this to 1 of 20 or better.

  good luck,

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by David E. Ros » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 02:45:25



Quote:
> A while back I requested ID on this plant:

> http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

> and response was Tulip.

> It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds.   I am
> collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
> ask:  Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

> Inquiring minds...

> So Calif Coastal

> TIA

> HB

Yes, that is how new varieties are created.

Bulbs ususally form pods with the seeds inside.  You should wait until
the pod starts to dry on the plant before havesting.  You might better
wait until the pod starts to split.  If you don't wait, the seeds will
not be sufficiently mature to sprout.

Only allow a very few pods to mature.  Seed formation often weakens the
bulb and might inhibit next year's flowers.

--
David E. Ross
Climate:  California Mediterranean, see
<http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by Higgs Boso » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 09:47:02



Quote:

> ...

> > ask: ?Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

> > Inquiring minds...

> ? yes, they can, it depends upon the genetics
> of the plants, some do well if they are cross-bred
> but don't self-fertilize well, others do just
> fine with self-pollination.

> ? the seeds that you can see through that are
> like superfine tissue paper with no nub (germ)
> visible in the flat part are not going to be
> viable. ?they blow away quite easily if you
> breath on them.

> ? the seeds that have some bulk to them and the
> nub in the middle are the best bet.

> ? to get them to sprout it is often a requirement
> for a cold damp period. ?some people use a fridge
> with damp peat moss, sand and perlite mix. ?must
> not dry out or they shrivel up and are gone to
> nothing quickly. ?after sprouting then put them
> in a loose soil mix and keep at least moist.
> damping off can be a problem, so the right surface
> layer of the soil is important. ?some people use
> grit for this.

> ? the sprouts will grow and look like a small
> chives or blades of grass the first season (about
> six weeks). ?below ground the sprout is putting a
> root downwards to make a tiny bulb. ?end of the
> first season the bulb is about the size of grain
> of rice and looks like a bulb in miniature. ?very
> cute!

> ? each year the bulb will get bigger and in some
> species will keep dropping down further to reach
> the right place for your climate. ?a flower
> can show up anywhere from three to seven years
> later (varies by species and growing conditions).

> ? from my rather scattered efforts without a
> dedicated place to sprout or keep them i'll probably
> get 1 of 300 seeds to ***hood. ?someone with more
> space, better soil and equipment could probably do
> quite well and get this to 1 of 20 or better.

> ? good luck,

> ? songbird

Wow, thanks, Songbird, for that detailed look at growing bulbs from
seed. Esp thanks for seed ID.  And how interesting, visualizing that
tiny bulb getting bigger by the year! Dunno if I have enuff years left
to wait out this process! But should be fascinating if I decide to
embark on the journey.

HB

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by Higgs Boso » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 11:21:50



Quote:

> > A while back I requested ID on this plant:

> >http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

> > and response was Tulip.

> > It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds. ? I am
> > collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
> > ask: ?Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

> > Inquiring minds...

> > So Calif Coastal

> > TIA

> > HB

> Yes, that is how new varieties are created.

> Bulbs ususally form pods with the seeds inside. ?You should wait until
> the pod starts to dry on the plant before havesting. ?You might better
> wait until the pod starts to split. ?If you don't wait, the seeds will
> not be sufficiently mature to sprout.

> Only allow a very few pods to mature. ?Seed formation often weakens the
> bulb and might inhibit next year's flowers.

> --
> David E. Ross
> Climate: ?California Mediterranean, see
> <http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
> Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

Thanks to you, too, David.  Yes, I have been waiting till the pods
start to dry.  Will keep an eye out for splitting, and not allow too
many to mature.

HB

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by David E. Ros » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 12:20:46



Quote:


>>> A while back I requested ID on this plant:

>>> http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

>>> and response was Tulip.

>>> It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds.   I am
>>> collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
>>> ask:  Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

>>> Inquiring minds...

>>> So Calif Coastal

>>> TIA

>>> HB

>> Yes, that is how new varieties are created.

>> Bulbs ususally form pods with the seeds inside.  You should wait until
>> the pod starts to dry on the plant before havesting.  You might better
>> wait until the pod starts to split.  If you don't wait, the seeds will
>> not be sufficiently mature to sprout.

>> Only allow a very few pods to mature.  Seed formation often weakens the
>> bulb and might inhibit next year's flowers.

>> --
>> David E. Ross
>> Climate:  California Mediterranean, see
>> <http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
>> Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

> Thanks to you, too, David.  Yes, I have been waiting till the pods
> start to dry.  Will keep an eye out for splitting, and not allow too
> many to mature.

> HB

In some cases, bulbs will actually reseed themselves.  I have a bed of
grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) in my back yard under a peach tree.
 The flower stalks are short and very numerous, far too numerous for me
to dead-head them which would require me to go through the bed on my
hands and knees with my nose only inches from the ground.  I now have
grape hyacinth coming up in other places, even in the decomposed granite
paths that wend through my garden.

--
David E. Ross
Climate:  California Mediterranean, see
<http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by allen7 » Wed, 07 Mar 2012 15:53:01


When the petals on the tulip blooms begin to wilt and fall of the stem
you can start the cleanup process. The blooms widen and one by one the
petals begin to fall off until just the stem, topped off by the seed pod
remain. Instead of cutting off the stems on the bulbs, just remove any
seed heads on your tulips that were pollinated during the spring. Unless
you're engaged in a tulip hybridizing program, and want to collect tulip
seeds, there's no need for your tulips to produce a seed pod. In fact,
your tulip bulbs will focus their energy on feeding the seed pod to
produce viable seeds negatively affecting next year's bloom. Deadhead
any tulip seed pods for healthier bulbs and more blooms next year.

--
allen73

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Thu, 08 Mar 2012 02:24:02


...

Quote:
> Wow, thanks, Songbird, for that detailed look at growing bulbs from
> seed. Esp thanks for seed ID.  And how interesting, visualizing that
> tiny bulb getting bigger by the year! Dunno if I have enuff years left
> to wait out this process! But should be fascinating if I decide to
> embark on the journey.

  you're welcome.  :)  i like tulips and playing
around with cross breeding.

  i moved two large patches in the late fall
(with roots and sprouts showing and all).  
yesterday i saw that those new patches are
coming up just fine.  so while it isn't the
best time to do things, it isn't the end of
the world for them either...

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Thu, 08 Mar 2012 01:36:36


...

Quote:
> In some cases, bulbs will actually reseed themselves.  I have a bed of
> grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) in my back yard under a peach tree.
>  The flower stalks are short and very numerous, far too numerous for me
> to dead-head them which would require me to go through the bed on my
> hands and knees with my nose only inches from the ground.  I now have
> grape hyacinth coming up in other places, even in the decomposed granite
> paths that wend through my garden.

  those are beautiful plants and quite a few
nice varieties now with different colors, but
like you've found out, they spread via seed
pretty easily.

  i only have a few patches of them and am
trying not to have too many more because they
do crowd out other plants from growing through
because the bulbs get so tightly packed among
each other.

  for many of the other spring bulb plants
i've had seeds at times, from crocus, regular
big hyacynths, daffodils and even iris (the
dutch bulb type and also the regular bearded
kinds).  the crocus seems to easily grow from
seeds, i always find sprouts in the gardens.
very tiny blades that look like grass or chives
again, but looking closely sorts it out.

  oftentimes it is rather hard to believe
that such a long stalk can come from such
a small start.  the tiny crocus bulbs can
be 1-2mm across.

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by Higgs Boso » Thu, 08 Mar 2012 06:27:56



Quote:



> >>> A while back I requested ID on this plant:

> >>>http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

> >>> and response was Tulip.

> >>> It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds. ? I am
> >>> collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
> >>> ask: ?Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

> >>> Inquiring minds...

> >>> So Calif Coastal

> >>> TIA

> >>> HB

> >> Yes, that is how new varieties are created.

> >> Bulbs ususally form pods with the seeds inside. ?You should wait until
> >> the pod starts to dry on the plant before havesting. ?You might better
> >> wait until the pod starts to split. ?If you don't wait, the seeds will
> >> not be sufficiently mature to sprout.

> >> Only allow a very few pods to mature. ?Seed formation often weakens the
> >> bulb and might inhibit next year's flowers.

> >> --
> >> David E. Ross
> >> Climate: ?California Mediterranean, see
> >> <http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
> >> Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

> > Thanks to you, too, David. ?Yes, I have been waiting till the pods
> > start to dry. ?Will keep an eye out for splitting, and not allow too
> > many to mature.

> > HB

> In some cases, bulbs will actually reseed themselves. ?I have a bed of
> grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) in my back yard under a peach tree.

***Surprised they would be happy under a tree which would shade them,
at least in summer before tree loses leaves. Have I misunderstood
something?

Quote:
> ?The flower stalks are short and very numerous, far too numerous for me
> to dead-head them which would require me to go through the bed on my
> hands and knees with my nose only inches from the ground.

Sounds like good exercise <g>

I now have > grape hyacinth coming up in other places, even in the
decomposed granite

Quote:
> paths that wend through my garden.

***Now THAT is interesting!.  Mind saying  how many years this has
taken to develop?

HB

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> --
> David E. Ross
> Climate: ?California Mediterranean, see
> <http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
> Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by David E. Ros » Thu, 08 Mar 2012 07:44:32



Quote:




>>>>> A while back I requested ID on this plant:

>>>>> http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5

>>>>> and response was Tulip.

>>>>> It is doing well in pot, and producing what look like seeds.   I am
>>>>> collecting these, and before I put time into growing them out, can I
>>>>> ask:  Does a bulb plant like Tulip produce viable seeds?

>>>>> Inquiring minds...

>>>>> So Calif Coastal

>>>>> TIA

>>>>> HB

>>>> Yes, that is how new varieties are created.

>>>> Bulbs ususally form pods with the seeds inside.  You should wait until
>>>> the pod starts to dry on the plant before havesting.  You might better
>>>> wait until the pod starts to split.  If you don't wait, the seeds will
>>>> not be sufficiently mature to sprout.

>>>> Only allow a very few pods to mature.  Seed formation often weakens the
>>>> bulb and might inhibit next year's flowers.

>>>> --
>>>> David E. Ross
>>>> Climate:  California Mediterranean, see
>>>> <http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
>>>> Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

>>> Thanks to you, too, David.  Yes, I have been waiting till the pods
>>> start to dry.  Will keep an eye out for splitting, and not allow too
>>> many to mature.

>>> HB

>> In some cases, bulbs will actually reseed themselves.  I have a bed of
>> grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) in my back yard under a peach tree.

> ***Surprised they would be happy under a tree which would shade them,
> at least in summer before tree loses leaves. Have I misunderstood
> something?

>>  The flower stalks are short and very numerous, far too numerous for me
>> to dead-head them which would require me to go through the bed on my
>> hands and knees with my nose only inches from the ground.

> Sounds like good exercise <g>

> I now have > grape hyacinth coming up in other places, even in the
> decomposed granite
>> paths that wend through my garden.

> ***Now THAT is interesting!.  Mind saying  how many years this has
> taken to develop?

> HB

Yes, the grape hyacinths are under a tree, but it is not a large tree.
In the summer, I get much more sunshine and hotter weather that you do.
 They seem to thrive with part shade.

They have been sharing space with primroses (Primula polyantha) for
about 35 years.

--
David E. Ross
Climate:  California Mediterranean, see
<http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html>
Gardening diary at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary>

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Tue, 13 Mar 2012 15:51:22


Quote:


...
>> ? the sprouts will grow and look like a small
>> chives or blades of grass the first season (about
>> six weeks). ?below ground the sprout is putting a
>> root downwards to make a tiny bulb. ?end of the
>> first season the bulb is about the size of grain
>> of rice and looks like a bulb in miniature. ?very
>> cute!
...
> Wow, thanks, Songbird, for that detailed look at growing bulbs from
> seed. Esp thanks for seed ID.  And how interesting, visualizing that
> tiny bulb getting bigger by the year! Dunno if I have enuff years left
> to wait out this process! But should be fascinating if I decide to
> embark on the journey.

  here is a picture for grins:

  http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_4123_Tiny_Tulips.jpg

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Sun, 18 Mar 2012 12:00:33


...

Quote:
> Inquiring minds...

  tomorrow i should be able to
get a few pictures of newly
sprouted tulip seeds.  i noticed
a few in the pots i put out last
summer.  nothing happened as it
was too warm, but now that they
went through a winter they've
sprouted.

  will post a link when i get the
picture sent to the website.

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by songbir » Mon, 19 Mar 2012 13:01:01


...

Quote:
> Inquiring minds...

  the pics i took today turned out:

  these are the new seedlings, some with seed still
attached.  the one in the back with the seed flat to
the camera shows a well formed seed.  compared to the
seedling in the foreground that is edgewise to the
camera you can see how thin the seeds are.

  http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_6090_Tulip_Seedlings.jpg

  the second year tulips are shown here just sprouting
out.  for scale of reference they are planted in pea
gravel so those are not rocks but pea sized pebbles.

  http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_6084_Tulip_Seedlings_2nd_Year.jpg

  songbird

 
 
 

Seeds from bulb plant?

Post by Higgs Boso » Mon, 19 Mar 2012 14:16:08



Quote:

> ...

> > Inquiring minds...

> ? the pics i took today turned out:

> ? these are the new seedlings, some with seed still
> attached. ?the one in the back with the seed flat to
> the camera shows a well formed seed. ?compared to the
> seedling in the foreground that is edgewise to the
> camera you can see how thin the seeds are.

> ?http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_6090_Tulip_Seedlings.jpg

> ? the second year tulips are shown here just sprouting
> out. ?for scale of reference they are planted in pea
> gravel so those are not rocks but pea sized pebbles.

> ?http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_6084_Tulip_Seedlings_2nd_Year.jpg

> ? songbird

Bird, you take a helluva picture.  My compliments.

HB