Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

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Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by orangejay » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 21:21:16



Hi

I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
for that would survive cold weather.

It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

Thanks in advance!

--
orangejayd

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Higgs Boso » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 04:43:13


Quote:

> Hi

> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go

> for that would survive cold weather.

> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it

> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much

> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm

> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse effect for the

> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through

> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

> Thanks in advance!

> I cant advise on cold weather, as my area is mild/Mediterran.

However, my one experience with passion flower was that it got away on me, so don't know whether it would run rampant in a boat wheelhouse, or whether cold weather (part of year) would keep it under control.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> --

> orangejayd

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Bill » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 14:34:24



Quote:

> Hi

> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
> for that would survive cold weather.

> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

> Thanks in advance!

It's a tropical plant, so it will probably die.

--
Remember Rachel Corrie
<http://www.moonsgarden.com/;

Welcome to the New America.
<http://www.moonsgarden.com/;

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Jeff Layma » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:57:51



Quote:

> Hi

> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
> for that would survive cold weather.

> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

> Thanks in advance!

The only passion flower with a degree of frost resistance in the UK is
Passiflora caerulea (Blue Passion Flower).  Some of its hybrids show a
similar degree of frost resistance.

But all top growth will be cut back to ground level in a severe frost.
Usually, in milder parts, growth will restart in spring, as the parts of
the plant below ground are protected to some extent from being frozen.
And P. caerulea roots can go fairly deep and spread widely.  However, in
your case the roots would also freeze as they would be in a pot, and the
plant would die.

If you have a frost-free place (kitchen window?) you could take some
cuttings, as Passiflora roots easily.  New plants can be grown quickly
once the weather warms up (if it warms up...) to replace any that have died.

But have you considered just how fast Passiflora grows once it gets
going?  You'll need a machete to get onto your boat after couple of
weeks. :-)

--

Jeff

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Dan Espe » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 04:32:36


Quote:


>> Hi

>> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
>> for that would survive cold weather.

>> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
>> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
>> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
>> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
>> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

>> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
>> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

>> Thanks in advance!

> The only passion flower with a degree of frost resistance in the UK is
> Passiflora caerulea (Blue Passion Flower).  Some of its hybrids show a
> similar degree of frost resistance.

> But all top growth will be cut back to ground level in a severe
> frost. Usually, in milder parts, growth will restart in spring, as the
> parts of the plant below ground are protected to some extent from
> being frozen. And P. caerulea roots can go fairly deep and spread
> widely.  However, in your case the roots would also freeze as they
> would be in a pot, and the plant would die.

> If you have a frost-free place (kitchen window?) you could take some
> cuttings, as Passiflora roots easily.  New plants can be grown quickly
> once the weather warms up (if it warms up...) to replace any that have
> died.

> But have you considered just how fast Passiflora grows once it gets
> going?  You'll need a machete to get onto your boat after couple of
> weeks. :-)

I don't think it's that bad.
I'm in Central NJ.

We had a Passion Flower vine in a basket near the pool.
The first season some of the vines grew to about 8 feet
but at no point did it cover the fence it was on, these
were just 2 or 3 shoots.

We bought the basket inside for the winter and hung it
in the window.  It struggled though the first winter and
repeated it's performance the next year.

Oh, I should mentioned, it flowered nicely both years.

The second year inside killed it, I don't think I watered it
enough.

Right now I'm trying a different vine.  It's made it though
the winter and I'm hoping we'll see flowers.

Anyway, I believe you need to protect these vines from cold
temperature, they're not that easy to overwinter, and they
probably won't take over unless you have a greenhouse or something.

--
Dan Espen

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Jeff Layma » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 16:21:26



Quote:


>>> Hi

>>> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
>>> for that would survive cold weather.

>>> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
>>> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
>>> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
>>> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
>>> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

>>> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
>>> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

>>> Thanks in advance!

>> The only passion flower with a degree of frost resistance in the UK is
>> Passiflora caerulea (Blue Passion Flower).  Some of its hybrids show a
>> similar degree of frost resistance.

>> But all top growth will be cut back to ground level in a severe
>> frost. Usually, in milder parts, growth will restart in spring, as the
>> parts of the plant below ground are protected to some extent from
>> being frozen. And P. caerulea roots can go fairly deep and spread
>> widely.  However, in your case the roots would also freeze as they
>> would be in a pot, and the plant would die.

>> If you have a frost-free place (kitchen window?) you could take some
>> cuttings, as Passiflora roots easily.  New plants can be grown quickly
>> once the weather warms up (if it warms up...) to replace any that have
>> died.

>> But have you considered just how fast Passiflora grows once it gets
>> going?  You'll need a machete to get onto your boat after couple of
>> weeks. :-)

> I don't think it's that bad.
> I'm in Central NJ.

Would that be zone 6b?  In the UK just about the coldest zone (Scottish
mountains) is equivalent to 7a - most are around 8a/b.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> We had a Passion Flower vine in a basket near the pool.
> The first season some of the vines grew to about 8 feet
> but at no point did it cover the fence it was on, these
> were just 2 or 3 shoots.

> We bought the basket inside for the winter and hung it
> in the window.  It struggled though the first winter and
> repeated it's performance the next year.

> Oh, I should mentioned, it flowered nicely both years.

> The second year inside killed it, I don't think I watered it
> enough.

> Right now I'm trying a different vine.  It's made it though
> the winter and I'm hoping we'll see flowers.

> Anyway, I believe you need to protect these vines from cold
> temperature, they're not that easy to overwinter, and they
> probably won't take over unless you have a greenhouse or something.

What Passion Flower were you growing?  If it was Passiflora incarnata
(Maypops), the odd thing is that is pretty hardy over in the USA, but it
is basically never seen here in the UK outside a greenhouse.  It just
doesn't like our winters - too warm and damp maybe?  Passiflora
caerulea, on the other hand, although supposedly less hardy than P.
incarnata, survives most winters here.  In the warmer areas of the south
and west, it can be a rampant vine. Once established, and given support,
it can cover the walls of a house quite easily.  But I don't think that
it is particularly long-lived, even in good conditions - if you get 10
years from it you've done very well.

--

Jeff

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Dan Espe » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 22:54:57


Quote:




>>>> Hi

>>>> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
>>>> for that would survive cold weather.

>>>> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
>>>> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
>>>> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
>>>> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
>>>> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

>>>> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
>>>> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

>>>> Thanks in advance!

>>> The only passion flower with a degree of frost resistance in the UK is
>>> Passiflora caerulea (Blue Passion Flower).  Some of its hybrids show a
>>> similar degree of frost resistance.

>>> But all top growth will be cut back to ground level in a severe
>>> frost. Usually, in milder parts, growth will restart in spring, as the
>>> parts of the plant below ground are protected to some extent from
>>> being frozen. And P. caerulea roots can go fairly deep and spread
>>> widely.  However, in your case the roots would also freeze as they
>>> would be in a pot, and the plant would die.

>>> If you have a frost-free place (kitchen window?) you could take some
>>> cuttings, as Passiflora roots easily.  New plants can be grown quickly
>>> once the weather warms up (if it warms up...) to replace any that have
>>> died.

>>> But have you considered just how fast Passiflora grows once it gets
>>> going?  You'll need a machete to get onto your boat after couple of
>>> weeks. :-)

>> I don't think it's that bad.
>> I'm in Central NJ.

> Would that be zone 6b?  In the UK just about the coldest zone
> (Scottish mountains) is equivalent to 7a - most are around 8a/b.

6A.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>> We had a Passion Flower vine in a basket near the pool.
>> The first season some of the vines grew to about 8 feet
>> but at no point did it cover the fence it was on, these
>> were just 2 or 3 shoots.

>> We bought the basket inside for the winter and hung it
>> in the window.  It struggled though the first winter and
>> repeated it's performance the next year.

>> Oh, I should mentioned, it flowered nicely both years.

>> The second year inside killed it, I don't think I watered it
>> enough.

>> Right now I'm trying a different vine.  It's made it though
>> the winter and I'm hoping we'll see flowers.

>> Anyway, I believe you need to protect these vines from cold
>> temperature, they're not that easy to overwinter, and they
>> probably won't take over unless you have a greenhouse or something.

> What Passion Flower were you growing?  If it was Passiflora incarnata
> (Maypops), the odd thing is that is pretty hardy over in the USA, but
> it is basically never seen here in the UK outside a greenhouse.  It
> just doesn't like our winters - too warm and damp maybe?  Passiflora
> caerulea, on the other hand, although supposedly less hardy than
> P. incarnata, survives most winters here.  In the warmer areas of the
> south and west, it can be a rampant vine. Once established, and given
> support, it can cover the walls of a house quite easily.  But I don't
> think that it is particularly long-lived, even in good conditions - if
> you get 10 years from it you've done very well.

Not sure what it was.  Here's a picture:

http://www.moonsgarden.com/

--
Dan Espen

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Dan Espe » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 01:55:30


Quote:







>> >>>> Hi

>> >>>> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go
>> >>>> for that would survive cold weather.

>> >>>> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it
>> >>>> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much
>> >>>> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm
>> >>>> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the
>> >>>> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

>> >>>> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through
>> >>>> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

>> >>>> Thanks in advance!

>> >>> The only passion flower with a degree of frost resistance in the UK is
>> >>> Passiflora caerulea (Blue Passion Flower).  Some of its hybrids show a
>> >>> similar degree of frost resistance.

>> >>> But all top growth will be cut back to ground level in a severe
>> >>> frost. Usually, in milder parts, growth will restart in spring, as the
>> >>> parts of the plant below ground are protected to some extent from
>> >>> being frozen. And P. caerulea roots can go fairly deep and spread
>> >>> widely.  However, in your case the roots would also freeze as they
>> >>> would be in a pot, and the plant would die.

>> >>> If you have a frost-free place (kitchen window?) you could take some
>> >>> cuttings, as Passiflora roots easily.  New plants can be grown quickly
>> >>> once the weather warms up (if it warms up...) to replace any that have
>> >>> died.

>> >>> But have you considered just how fast Passiflora grows once it gets
>> >>> going?  You'll need a machete to get onto your boat after couple of
>> >>> weeks. :-)

>> >> I don't think it's that bad.
>> >> I'm in Central NJ.

>> > Would that be zone 6b?  In the UK just about the coldest zone
>> > (Scottish mountains) is equivalent to 7a - most are around 8a/b.

>> 6A.

>> >> We had a Passion Flower vine in a basket near the pool.
>> >> The first season some of the vines grew to about 8 feet
>> >> but at no point did it cover the fence it was on, these
>> >> were just 2 or 3 shoots.

>> >> We bought the basket inside for the winter and hung it
>> >> in the window.  It struggled though the first winter and
>> >> repeated it's performance the next year.

>> >> Oh, I should mentioned, it flowered nicely both years.

>> >> The second year inside killed it, I don't think I watered it
>> >> enough.

>> >> Right now I'm trying a different vine.  It's made it though
>> >> the winter and I'm hoping we'll see flowers.

>> >> Anyway, I believe you need to protect these vines from cold
>> >> temperature, they're not that easy to overwinter, and they
>> >> probably won't take over unless you have a greenhouse or something.

>> > What Passion Flower were you growing?  If it was Passiflora incarnata
>> > (Maypops), the odd thing is that is pretty hardy over in the USA, but
>> > it is basically never seen here in the UK outside a greenhouse.  It
>> > just doesn't like our winters - too warm and damp maybe?  Passiflora
>> > caerulea, on the other hand, although supposedly less hardy than
>> > P. incarnata, survives most winters here.  In the warmer areas of the
>> > south and west, it can be a rampant vine. Once established, and given
>> > support, it can cover the walls of a house quite easily.  But I don't
>> > think that it is particularly long-lived, even in good conditions - if
>> > you get 10 years from it you've done very well.

>> Not sure what it was.  Here's a picture:

>> http://www.moonsgarden.com/

> Mine is purple and white, but that's a passion flower.

Yeah, I know Passion Flower, but I checked this AM,
there appear to be 500 species of Passion Flower.

The one I had looks a lot like Incarnata (one of the most common).

I first saw a passion flower growing wild in Georgia (USA).
It's a truly amazing flower.
I intend to get another one next time I see one.

--
Dan Espen

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Jeff Layma » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 04:49:47



Quote:

>>> Not sure what it was.  Here's a picture:

>>> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12671080/640/12671080.jpg

>> Mine is purple and white, but that's a passion flower.

> Yeah, I know Passion Flower, but I checked this AM,
> there appear to be 500 species of Passion Flower.

> The one I had looks a lot like Incarnata (one of the most common).

The picture you've linked to above is not P. incarnata.  It looks a bit
like Passiflora 'Lady Margareth'
(http://www.passiflora.it/LadyMargareth.htm).  There are dozens of
passion flower photos at that site.  You might find yours amongst them -
start at http://www.passiflora.it/a.htm

--

Jeff

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Dan Espe » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 05:10:55


Quote:


>>>> Not sure what it was.  Here's a picture:

>>>> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12671080/640/12671080.jpg

>>> Mine is purple and white, but that's a passion flower.

>> Yeah, I know Passion Flower, but I checked this AM,
>> there appear to be 500 species of Passion Flower.

>> The one I had looks a lot like Incarnata (one of the most common).

> The picture you've linked to above is not P. incarnata.  It looks a
> bit like Passiflora 'Lady Margareth'
> (http://www.passiflora.it/LadyMargareth.htm).  There are dozens of
> passion flower photos at that site.  You might find yours amongst them
> -
> start at http://www.passiflora.it/a.htm

Sure looks like a pretty good match.

This is motivating me to get another one.

--
Dan Espen

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Jeff Layma » Sun, 14 Apr 2013 06:15:03



Quote:


>>>>> Not sure what it was.  Here's a picture:

>>>>> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12671080/640/12671080.jpg

>>>> Mine is purple and white, but that's a passion flower.

>>> Yeah, I know Passion Flower, but I checked this AM,
>>> there appear to be 500 species of Passion Flower.

>>> The one I had looks a lot like Incarnata (one of the most common).

>> The picture you've linked to above is not P. incarnata.  It looks a
>> bit like Passiflora 'Lady Margareth'
>> (http://www.passiflora.it/LadyMargareth.htm).  There are dozens of
>> passion flower photos at that site.  You might find yours amongst them
>> -
>> start at http://www.passiflora.it/a.htm

> Sure looks like a pretty good match.

> This is motivating me to get another one.

Logees have it
(http://www.logees.com/Passion-Flower-Lady-Margaret-Passiflora-hybrid/...).

Some fantastic stuff available there.  Pity they don't export to Europe. :-(

--

Jeff

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Higgs Boso » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 11:51:35


Quote:

> Hi

> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go

> for that would survive cold weather.

> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it

> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much

> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm

> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the

> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through

> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

> Thanks in advance!

Does anybody know how this flower got its name?  No fair looking it up first.

HB

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by David Hare-Scot » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 12:33:32


Quote:

> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty ***
> through cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

You can find things *** in the most unexpected places.  When our
cumquat tree started to produce a few years ago we made marmalade which is
very good but you can only eat so much marmalade.  So my wife started
browsing for other recipes and happened to google "cumquat jam".  She has
not lived a sheltered life but told me she found some extraordinary material
(having nothing to do with cooking little citrus fruit) of people doing
things that she had never imagined was possible.

David

 
 
 

Advice on which type of Passion Flower to go for?

Post by Nelly » Mon, 22 Apr 2013 10:59:15



Quote:

>> Hi

>> I'm going to be buying a Passion vine and need to know which type to go

>> for that would survive cold weather.

>> It'll be kept in the wheelhouse of a boat which is un-insulated, so it

>> will be protected from the wind but the tempreture will be pretty much

>> the same as outdoors, which is pretty chilly most of the time. I'm

>> guessing during Summer it'd have almost a greenhouse affect for the

>> plant, if we manage to have any Summer that is.

>> Anyone know of any good types of vines that are pretty *** through

>> cold weather but still have the colourful scented flowers too?

>> Thanks in advance!

> Does anybody know how this flower got its name?  No fair looking it up first.

> HB

It's a Christ-thing.