How can I save this plant, and what is it?

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How can I save this plant, and what is it?

Post by KatoN » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 23:56:48



Below is a link for a plant that was given to me last year.
The plant was doing fine until one part of the plant turned half
yellow, and the part that was still green fell right off, -cleanly-.
Not knowing much about it, but still wanting to save it, I
placed the still green part that fell off into a tall glass of water.
It has been easily over a month now and I noticed
that the piece of the tree is actually growing roots on the bottom
(you can see it on the pict/link below)
When should I place this piece back into soil.
Should I place it in the same pot of the original tree?
How deep should I re-plant this piece?
I would appreciate any tips on how to save this plant.
Also, not sure if you can notice but on the piece itself is a hole
(looks dried out somewhat.).But still the leaves are green,
and there seems to be a new leaf sprouting.
Is this something to worry about.
I appreciate any help.

Here is the link...
http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/tekken1999/plant.jpg

 
 
 

How can I save this plant, and what is it?

Post by Garden En » Wed, 02 Jul 2003 12:10:19


Quote:

> > When should I place this piece back into soil.
> Should I place it in the same pot of the original tree?
> How deep should I re-plant this piece?
> I would appreciate any tips on how to save this plant.
> Also, not sure if you can notice but on the piece itself is a hole

> Here is the link...
> http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/tekken1999/plant.jpg

Your plant is a Dieffenbachia, a popular houseplant that actually
likes more light that what people normally give it.  Perhaps your
piece broke off because it was getting long and scraggly from
insufficient light.  You were smart, however, to put the piece into a
glass of water, as this genus roots quickly and easily.  Let the roots
grow quite a bit more in the glass, and then transplant it into new
(just to rule out the fact that there might have been a contaminant in
the soil) soil, putting several inches into the pot.  This will allow
more roots to develop along the old stem and provide good anchorage.
Keep it well-watered and misted for a couple weeks after
transplanting--until the roots become adjusted to their new and drier
surroundings.

They'll be calling you the plant doctor in no time!

Garden Envy
www.garden-envy.com :: online support and information on all types of
plants.