live oak prunning

Description of your first forum.

live oak prunning

Post by Lubos&Irene Paloune » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00



We just moved to the southwest part of Austin, Texas. We bought a house
with about a 1.5 acre lot; our oak and (juniper/red cedar) trees need a
lot of prunning. We can't afford a professional service.

I am a gardening beginner and need some good basic instructions: how to
prune, whether to use some wound dressing (tree dressing, clear lacquer,
***paint, elmer glue ...?), when to prune, etc.

Please point me to some good, concise source of information; either

Thank you for any help. Regards, Irene and Lubos Palounek

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by Lubos&Irene Paloune » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00


I just realized it is "pruning", not "prunning" we need to do; so I am
re-sending the question, so that the wrong spelling does not confuse
some databases ... Sorry for wasting the space.

[I told you that I am a beginer  :-)  ]
----
We just moved to the southwest part of Austin, Texas. We bought a house
with about a 1.5 acre lot; our oak and (juniper/red cedar) trees need a
lot of pruning. We can't afford a professional service.

I am a gardening beginner and need some good basic instructions: how to
prune, whether to use some wound dressing (tree dressing, clear lacquer,
***paint, elmer glue ...?), when to prune, etc.

Please point us to some good, concise source of information; either

Quote:

> Thank you for any help. Regards, Irene and Lubos Palounek

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by forrest appleto » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I just realized it is "pruning", not "prunning" we need to do; so I am
> re-sending the question, so that the wrong spelling does not confuse
> some databases ... Sorry for wasting the space.

> [I told you that I am a beginer  :-)  ]
> ----
> We just moved to the southwest part of Austin, Texas. We bought a house
> with about a 1.5 acre lot; our oak and (juniper/red cedar) trees need a
> lot of pruning. We can't afford a professional service.

> I am a gardening beginner and need some good basic instructions: how to
> prune, whether to use some wound dressing (tree dressing, clear lacquer,
>***paint, elmer glue ...?), when to prune, etc.

> Please point us to some good, concise source of information; either

> > Thank you for any help. Regards, Irene and Lubos Palounek

give your county extension service a call and ask for their brochures on
pruning and oak wilt prevention.
--
forrest appleton  san antonio, tx  usda zone 8
 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by David Ros » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> We just moved to the southwest part of Austin, Texas. We bought a house
> with about a 1.5 acre lot; our oak and (juniper/red cedar) trees need a
> lot of pruning. We can't afford a professional service.

> I am a gardening beginner and need some good basic instructions: how to
> prune, whether to use some wound dressing (tree dressing, clear lacquer,
>***paint, elmer glue ...?), when to prune, etc.

> Please point us to some good, concise source of information; either


I don't know about junipers kor cedars.  Oaks should not be pruned
except to remove dead or diseased limbs.  Weak limbs should be cabeled
rather than removed.  Large pruning cuts heal very slowly and often lead
to decay and hollows.  Young branches can be trimmed to guide future
growth, but only a little each year.  (Oaks are quite the opposite of
peaches.  For the latter, typical pruning involves removing the
equivalent of 2/3 of the old season's growth.)

Many advise not to seal pruning wounds.  For heading cuts, I strongly
disagree.  These are the cuts that shorten a branch without removing it
to its source.  I always seal such cuts with white glue to keep borers
out.

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by Sue Jeffer » Sat, 04 Jan 1997 04:00:00


#I just realized it is "pruning", not "prunning" we need to do; so I am
#re-sending the question, so that the wrong spelling does not confuse
#some databases ... Sorry for wasting the space.
#
#[I told you that I am a beginer  :-)  ]
#----
#We just moved to the southwest part of Austin, Texas. We bought a house
#with about a 1.5 acre lot; our oak and (juniper/red cedar) trees need a
#lot of pruning. We can't afford a professional service.
#
#I am a gardening beginner and need some good basic instructions: how to
#prune, whether to use some wound dressing (tree dressing, clear lacquer,
#latex paint, elmer glue ...?), when to prune, etc.
#
#Please point us to some good, concise source of information; either

#>
#> Thank you for any help. Regards, Irene and Lubos Palounek

Do talk to the city arborist (see the blue section of your telephone
directory).  I've noticed that David Ross has given you some advice and
generally he knows alot of useful stuff but David is unaware of the oak
wilt problem in some parts of Austin.  The arborist has been advising that
red oaks and live oaks be pruned in winter months (Jan. & Feb.), that
pruning equipment be washed with clorox solution to disinfect it (oak wilt
is a fungus) and to "paint" cuts.  Latex paint works, also tree dressing.
Elmers glue is water soluble, even if dried.

Good luck in doing it yourself.  The other trick is where to cut.  Be
careful of topping--it ruins the natural shape of the tree.  Prune
carefully and step back (after you get off the ladder) and look to see
what's left as you go.  You can't glue the limbs back on.  With some
trees, if you cut off the bud of the limb--the growing end--sometimes you
kill the entire limb.  

The other thing is that there's lots of itinerant yardwork guys who go
house to house looking for work.  They don't necessarily know what they
are doing.  If one offers you a deal you can't refuse, be sure to watch
them like a hawk.

SueJ

--
Sue Jefferys

Unlawful to use this email address for unsolicited ads: USC Title 47 Sec 227

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by Lubos&Irene Paloune » Sat, 04 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Sue,
thank you for your note. I tried to look up the City Arborists in the
blue section of the phonebook and on the http://www.moonsgarden.com/
page, without success. All I found in the blue pages is the City
Forester, (512) 476-6485; when I called that number, I got the
phonemail/answering machine.

At this moment, we do not plan to do any pruning of the major branches.
However, there is a lot of "new growth" small branches, mostly less than
one inch thick and several feet long, sprouting just about everywhere on
the tree and the limbs. I think we should cut all of those (except the
tip of the limb), correct? I plan to cut them about one inch from the
limb, and within fif*** minutes or so cover the wound with exterior
***paint. Is that the correct procedure?

Can we cut all of them at one time? They are plenty of them, with a lot
of leaves. By pruning all of them, we would reduce the amount of leaves
on the tree by perhaps 50%. Is that acceptable? If not, what is the
correct procedure? Cut all the "new small branches" from one of the main
limbs now, and do the "new small branches" from another limb later? How
much later?

Is***paint better or worse as compared to the "special" tree paint
available in stores? What is better, the spray or the brush-applied
kind?

How often should the pruning equipment be washed with Clorox solution or
lysol to disinfect it? Is lysol better than Clorex? What about WD40?

As newcomers to Texas, we don't know how a tree infected by the oak wilt
looks -- however, I listened to the description given at the (512)
473-3517 Oak Wilt Information Line, and I do not think any of our trees
has been infected. We will go and look carefully.

Thanks again for your help, cheers, Lubos.
------------

Quote:

> Do talk to the city arborist (see the blue section of your telephone
> directory).  I've noticed that David Ross has given you some advice and
> generally he knows alot of useful stuff but David is unaware of the oak
> wilt problem in some parts of Austin.  The arborist has been advising that
> red oaks and live oaks be pruned in winter months (Jan. & Feb.), that
> pruning equipment be washed with clorox solution to disinfect it (oak wilt
> is a fungus) and to "paint" cuts.  Latex paint works, also tree dressing.
> Elmers glue is water soluble, even if dried.

> Good luck in doing it yourself.  The other trick is where to cut.  Be
> careful of topping--it ruins the natural shape of the tree.  Prune
> carefully and step back (after you get off the ladder) and look to see
> what's left as you go.  You can't glue the limbs back on.  With some
> trees, if you cut off the bud of the limb--the growing end--sometimes you
> kill the entire limb.

> The other thing is that there's lots of itinerant yardwork guys who go
> house to house looking for work.  They don't necessarily know what they
> are doing.  If one offers you a deal you can't refuse, be sure to watch
> them like a hawk.

> SueJ

> --
> Sue Jefferys

> Unlawful to use this email address for unsolicited ads: USC Title 47 Sec 227

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by David Ros » Sat, 04 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Lubos&Irene Palounek wrote [in part]:

Quote:

> At this moment, we do not plan to do any pruning of the major branches.
> However, there is a lot of "new growth" small branches, mostly less than
> one inch thick and several feet long, sprouting just about everywhere on
> the tree and the limbs. I think we should cut all of those (except the
> tip of the limb), correct? I plan to cut them about one inch from the
> limb, and within fif*** minutes or so cover the wound with exterior
>***paint. Is that the correct procedure?

> Can we cut all of them at one time? They are plenty of them, with a lot
> of leaves. By pruning all of them, we would reduce the amount of leaves
> on the tree by perhaps 50%. Is that acceptable? If not, what is the
> correct procedure? Cut all the "new small branches" from one of the main
> limbs now, and do the "new small branches" from another limb later? How
> much later?

> Is***paint better or worse as compared to the "special" tree paint
> available in stores? What is better, the spray or the brush-applied
> kind?

Don't remove all the new growth in one year.  Don't remove more than
about 10% of it.  Leave more than an inch, or else cut to the collar.
One-inch stubs will take forever to heal.  Oaks are not peaches: they
don't like a lot of pruning.  

Better than***paint is white glue (Elmer's, Willhold, etc).  Apply
it when no rain is expected during the next three days.  Many others
assert that the pruning wounds need no sealing at all, but I would seal
heading cuts (where you shorten a branch by cutting the end off but you
don't remove it back to its parent branch).

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by TreeD » Sun, 05 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Lubos&Irene Palounek wrote [in part]:

>> At this moment, we do not plan to do any pruning of the major branches.
>> However, there is a lot of "new growth" small branches, mostly less than
>> one inch thick and several feet long, sprouting just about everywhere on
>> the tree and the limbs. I think we should cut all of those (except the
>> tip of the limb), correct? I plan to cut them about one inch from the
>> limb, and within fif*** minutes or so cover the wound with exterior
>>***paint. Is that the correct procedure?

>> Can we cut all of them at one time? They are plenty of them, with a lot
>> of leaves. By pruning all of them, we would reduce the amount of leaves
>> on the tree by perhaps 50%. Is that acceptable? If not, what is the
>> correct procedure? Cut all the "new small branches" from one of the main
>> limbs now, and do the "new small branches" from another limb later? How
>> much later?

>> Is***paint better or worse as compared to the "special" tree paint
>> available in stores? What is better, the spray or the brush-applied
>> kind?

>Don't remove all the new growth in one year.  Don't remove more than
>about 10% of it.  Leave more than an inch, or else cut to the collar.
>One-inch stubs will take forever to heal.  Oaks are not peaches: they
>don't like a lot of pruning.  

>Better than***paint is white glue (Elmer's, Willhold, etc).  Apply
>it when no rain is expected during the next three days.  Many others
>assert that the pruning wounds need no sealing at all, but I would seal
>heading cuts (where you shorten a branch by cutting the end off but you
>don't remove it back to its parent branch).

Okay...so I worry to much about tree advice..!!!! LOL

David is right here.....reducing the amount of foliage dramatically has a
cost...after all..where does tree 'food " come from??  right.!!!
foliage...so be VERY careful about how much and what you prune..and what
you leave...I wish I had a simple recipe to give you..but it takes some
experience...

Where I differ from others on is this wound paint thing....the ONLY reason
to apply any wound covering to an oak wound..is to provide a simple,
temporary barrier for the amount of time that the fresh wound is
suceptible to infection...this time is about 48 hours..after that..the
tree has responded to a properly made pruning wound and no longer needs
the benefits of "sealing" material.   I have not found ANY evidence that
pruning paints do ANYTHING to prevent other pathogens (like decay) or
insects from entering wounds...not even heading cuts..

i would use a material to paint oak wounds that will wear away readily
with time....and allow the tree to cary on the natural process it has
evolved..

Good luck!

Dennis Brown, Consulting Arborist
Urban Forestry Resources
Austin, TX
(512) 263-2798

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by Sue Jeffer » Thu, 09 Jan 1997 04:00:00


#Sue,
#thank you for your note. I tried to look up the City Arborists --snip---

Sorry you had trouble---I guess what I did was contact the county
agriculture extension agent--the horticulturist is a helpful guy-- and
then got referred to the arborist.  I didn't try to call since I was
getting a permit to remove a tree so I went in person.  (I don't have the
foggiest idea of where that office was.)  It may be hard to get through to
him--he's popular-- but not many folks are doing much gardening now so
this might be an ideal time to call.  Get referrals if you're at the wrong
"place."  Be prepared to make alot of phone calls if you need to talk to
him.  

#At this moment, we do not plan to do any pruning of the major branches.
#However, there is a lot of "new growth" small branches, mostly less than
#one inch thick and several feet long, sprouting just about everywhere on
#the tree and the limbs. I think we should cut all of those (except the
#tip of the limb), correct? I plan to cut them about one inch from the
#limb, and within fif*** minutes or so cover the wound with exterior
#latex paint. Is that the correct procedure?
#
#Can we cut all of them at one time? ----snip----

I've personally never drastically pruned any of our trees.  The 10% off
any tree per year that others have suggested sounds right to me.
Generally, the professionals clear out the sprouts from the large limbs in
the "center" of the tree.  The distance from the trunk depends on the size
of the tree.  They generally prune off fairly close to the limb.  An inch
is too long but you don't want to cut flush either.  Just paint the larger
wounds on the same day you cut.

I suggest you go to the library and check out some books dealing with
pruning techniques.  Those pictures are worth a thousand words.  Neil
Sperry's "Complete Guide to Texas Gardening" is a great book.  It has lots
of info.  In fact, I suggest you buy yourself a copy.

#Is***paint better or worse as compared to the "special" tree paint
#available in stores? What is better, the spray or the brush-applied
#kind?

I haven't seen***in a spray can.  The advantage of***is that it
cleans up easier.  The tree paint is "oil" based.  Use spray or brush on,
your choice.  I'm not the neatest of spray painters, so I end up getting
the *** stuff on my hands, so I like the brush on variety.

#How often should the pruning equipment be washed with Clorox solution or
#lysol to disinfect it? Is lysol better than Clorex? What about WD40?

Clorox definitely kills the fungus and spores.  Use it before starting to
prune.  You need not retreat during the day.  I would start each pruning
session with the clorox treatment.  Clorox has the advantage of being
cheap to use.  You may dry off the cutting tools with a papertowel so the
stuff doesn't drip all over you.  WD40 is a lubricant.

You probably don't have a problem with oak wilt--it's mostly in the
extreme northeast of the city and Cedar Park, but you never can be sure
that your neighbors or someone two streets away doesn't have it.  The
largest part of the fungus grows underground in a HUGE mat.  An affected
tree has leaves where the veins have turned brown--then later the whole
leaf dies, followed by a sick -looking tree, followed by a dead tree.
Some folks have brought it to their yards by buying infected firewood.

Welcome to Austin--I moved here about 30 years ago.

SueJ

--
Sue Jefferys

Unlawful to use this email address for unsolicited ads: USC Title 47 Sec 227

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by John A. Keslick, Jr » Thu, 09 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Trees have three crowns and when you remove all the inner braches you
have over pruned and removed the crown that functions at the hottest
temps.  This can increase chances of oak wilt more than not using wound
dressing and proper pruning.

The outer crown works when it is cool out.  Then the next inner crown
and then the inner most when its really hot.  See this is a built in
feature for very good reason.  If you are good and climb the tree you
can feel a different texture of the three crowns I am told.

I highly suggest that using wound dressings will not bring back what you
have taken off.

I repeat your problems are improper pruning pratices and not a lack of
wound dressing.

Oh, well some people are happy taking other peoples money.  Just put it
in an envelope and they will be by to pick it up.

Boy I could really make a killing if I lived in Texas but I am to honest
and understand trees too much.

I FEEL YOUR TREES PAIN!!!!
--

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\//////////////\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
John A. Keslick Jr.              If you are not OUTRAGED you're not  
Tree Anatomist & Tree Biologist                   paying attention.
Phone: 610-696-5353                    
organic tree treatment web site:
http://www.ccil.org/~treeman/  OR  http://www.ccil.org/~kenm/env/

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by John A. Keslick, Jr » Thu, 09 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Trees have three crowns and when you remove all the inner braches you
have over pruned and removed the crown that functions at the hottest
temps.  This can increase chances of oak wilt more than not using wound
dressing and proper pruning.

The outer crown works when it is cool out.  Then the next inner crown
and then the inner most when its really hot.  See this is a built in
feature for very good reason.  If you are good and climb the tree you
can feel a different texture of the three crowns I am told.

I highly suggest that using wound dressings will not bring back what you
have taken off.

I repeat your problems are improper pruning pratices and not a lack of
wound dressing.

Oh, well some people are happy taking other peoples money.  Just put it
in an envelope and they will be by to pick it up.

Boy I could really make a killing if I lived in Texas but I am to honest
and understand trees too much.

I FEEL YOUR TREES PAIN!!!!

--

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\//////////////\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
John A. Keslick Jr.              If you are not OUTRAGED you're not  
Tree Anatomist & Tree Biologist                   paying attention.
Phone: 610-696-5353                    
organic tree treatment web site:
http://www.ccil.org/~treeman/  OR  http://www.ccil.org/~kenm/env/

 
 
 

live oak prunning

Post by <quer.. » Fri, 10 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>Trees have three crowns and when you remove all the inner braches you
>have over pruned and removed the crown that functions at the hottest
>temps.  This can increase chances of oak wilt more than not using wound
>dressing and proper pruning.

>The outer crown works when it is cool out.  Then the next inner crown
>and then the inner most when its really hot.  See this is a built in
>feature for very good reason.  If you are good and climb the tree you
>can feel a different texture of the three crowns I am told.

>I highly suggest that using wound dressings will not bring back what you
>have taken off.

>I repeat your problems are improper pruning pratices and not a lack of
>wound dressing.

>Oh, well some people are happy taking other peoples money.  Just put it
>in an envelope and they will be by to pick it up.

>Boy I could really make a killing if I lived in Texas but I am to honest
>and understand trees too much.

>I FEEL YOUR TREES PAIN!!!!

Well as we can all see..he's back..all spit an venom but no
intellignence..and absolutely no idea about what is going on here.

Mr. Keslick might make a killing here..but he is virtually unemployed in PA.
He apparently gets his kicks by stirring up conforntations on newsgroups.
You might be interested in doing a search on the net for his posts..very
enlightening!....

Please, Please, Please,  lets just ignore this babble...

I will NO LONGER be posting replies to or responding in any way to Mr.
Keslick.

If anyone has a question about any of his babble I will be happy yo answer
it as email, but I don't want to provoke the use of anymore space here.  

Dennis Brown, Consulting Arborist
Urban Forestry Resources
Austin, TX
(512)263-2798